Heritage Read Aloud Week!

March 5th was World Read Aloud Day,  and to celebrate this day we have added some AMAZING read aloud titles to our Overdrive Library. Here is a comprehensive list of read aloud books,  which you may want to look at. If you take a look under Newest Additons you will find many new titles. I have highlighted just a few awesome read aloud e-books from our Overdrive Library:

The Borrowers

The Borrowers by Mary Norton

The Borrowers—the Clock family: Homily, Pod, and their fourteen-year-old daughter, Arrietty, to be precise—are tiny people who live underneath the kitchen floor of an old English country manor. All their minuscule home furnishings, from postage stamp paintings to champagne cork chairs, are “borrowed” from the “human beans” who tromp around loudly above them. All is well until Pod is spotted upstairs by a human boy! Can the Clocks stay nested safely in their beloved hidden home, or will they be forced to flee? The British author Mary Norton won the Carnegie Medal for The Borrowers in 1952, the year it was first published in England.

Indian Captive

Indian Captive by Lois Lenski

Mary Jemison has been captured by a Shawnee war party! How will she survive? When twelve-year-old Mary Jemison and her family are captured by Shawnee raiders, she’s sure they’ll all be killed. Instead, Mary is separated from her siblings and traded to two Seneca sisters, who adopt her and make her one of their own. Mary misses her home, but the tribe is kind to her. She learns to plant crops, make clay pots, and sew moccasins, just as the other members do. Slowly, Mary realizes that the Indians are not the monsters she believed them to be. When Mary is given the chance to return to her world, will she want to leave the tribe that has become her family?   This Newbery Honor book is based on the true story of Mary Jemison, the pioneer known as the “White Woman of the Genesee.”   This ebook features an illustrated biography of Lois Lenski including rare images and never-before-seen documents from the author’s estate.

Holes

Holes by Louis Sachar

This winner of the Newbery Medal and the National Book Award features Stanley Yelnats, a kid who is under a curse. A curse that began with his no-good-dirty-rotten-pig-stealing-great-great-grandfather and has since followed generations of Yelnats. Now Stanley has been unjustly sent to a boys’ detention center, Camp Green Lake, where the warden makes the boys “build character” by spending all day, every day, digging holes five feet wide and five feet deep. It doesn’t take long for Stanley to realize there’s more than character improvement going on at Camp Green Lake: the warden is looking for something. Stanley tries to dig up the truth in this inventive and darkly humorous tale of crime and punishment–and redemption.

Tale of Despereaux

The Tale of Despereaux by Kate DiCamillo

Welcome to the story of Despereaux Tilling, a mouse who is in love with music, stories, and a princess named Pea. It is also the story of a rat called Roscuro, who lives in the darkness and covets a world filled with light. And it is the story of Miggery Sow, a slow-witted serving girl who harbors a simple, impossible wish. These three characters are about to embark on a journey that will lead them down into a horrible dungeon, up into a glittering castle, and, ultimately, into each other’s lives. What happens then? As Kate DiCamillo would say: Reader, it is your destiny to find out.

The Phantom Tollbooth

The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster

Illustrated in black-and-white. We’re celebrating the thirty-fifth anniversary (1996) of this modern kids’ classic with a special hardcover edition! This ingenious fantasy centeres around Milo, a bored ten-year-old who comes home to find a large toy tollbooth sitting in his room. Joining forces with a watchdog named Tock, Milo drives through the tollbooth’s gates and begins a memorable journey. He meets such characters as the foolish, yet lovable Humbug, the Mathemagician, and the not-so-wicked “Which,” Faintly Macabre, who gives Milo the “impossible” mission of returning two princesses to the Kingdom of Wisdom…

The Shakespeare Stealer

The Shakespeare Stealer by Gary Blackwood

Widge is an orphan with a rare talent for shorthand. His fearsome master has just one demand: steal Shakespeare’s play “Hamlet”—or else. Widge has no choice but to follow orders, so he works his way into the heart of the Globe Theatre, where Shakespeare’s players perform. As full of twists and turns as a London alleyway, this entertaining novel is rich in period details, colorful characters, villainy, and drama.

Island of the Blue Dolphins

Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell

Far off the coast of California looms a harsh rock known as the island of San Nicholas. Dolphins flash in the blue waters around it, sea otter play in the vast kep beds, and sea elephants loll on the stony beaches.

Here, in the early 1800s, according to history, an Indian girl spent eighteen years alone, and this beautifully written novel is her story. It is a romantic adventure filled with drama and heartache, for not only was mere subsistence on so desolate a spot a near miracle, but Karana had to contend with the ferocious pack of wild dogs that had killed her younger brother, constantly guard against the Aleutian sea otter hunters, and maintain a precarious food supply.

More than this, it is an adventure of the spirit that will haunt the reader long after the book has been put down. Karana’s quiet courage, her Indian self-reliance and acceptance of fate, transform what to many would have been a devastating ordeal into an uplifting experience. From loneliness and terror come strength and serenity in this Newbery Medal-winning classic.

Anne of Green Gables

Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery

Anne of Green Gables is a best-selling novel and Canadian classic. It was originally intended for all audiences, but is now commonly considered a children’s book.

Two middle-aged siblings decide to adopt an orphan to help them on their farm. But instead of the boy they were expecting, a plucky young girl called Anne Shirley turns up on their doorstep…

Little Women

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women is a classic of American fiction that was originally published in two consecutive books (Little Women and Good Wives). The latter were later grouped in the present volume. In a rather autobiographical fashion, Alcott tells the story of an ordinary American family living in Concord, Massachusetts. When the father leaves for war, the family’s four sisters, Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy, along with their mother, have to take charge of their own destiny. Their financial situation worsens and Meg and Jo succeed in finding jobs while Amy goes to school and Beth stays at home. Jo is the most daring of all her sisters. In her father’s absence, she acts like the man of the house. She befriends their neighbors’ son, Theodore Laurence, who soon becomes like the fifth sibling of the family. The book speaks about the many adventures and pleasant activities that the girls accompanied by Theodore get involved in. When he later reveals his love to Jo, she rejects him, claiming that he is a brother to her. Theodore eventually accepts the situation and finds a new love. Meg and Amy meet the men of their lives while Jo remains more interested in the stories that she writes. However, she too seems to fall in love by the end.

reviews provided by Overdrive

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: