Pauline Johnson – Canadian Poet Born on March 10th

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Pauline Johnson is a Canadian poet whose poetry was published in Canada, the US and Great Britain. Her father was a Mohawk chief and her mother an English immigrant and her First Nations heritage is reflected in her poetry.
Discovery Education has a short video segment about Pauline Johnson. Learn 360 has a video clip about her as well.
To celebrate Pauline Johnson’s First Nations heritage here are some of the resources that we have available on Overdrive that relate to First People’s culture and history.
 Cover of Brothers of the Wolf

“Prior to contact, our children were taught important life lessons through stories. Caroll has captured the essence of this through her beautifully illustrated books . . . Caroll’s work is not only timely, it is vital.”—Robert Charlie, former chief of the Ts’il Kaz Koh First Nation

Brothers of the Wolf is the tale two wolf cubs found and raised in a village on the Pacific coast as human children. The wolf cub brothers, Tkope and Klale, are very different from one another. One feels most at home in the forest, while the other is more comfortable in the sea. When they undergo a supernatural transformation, one turns into a Sea Wolf and one turns into a Timber Wolf. Although they are separated, their howling voices unite at regular intervals, waking up Moon and saving the world from uncertain darkness.Taking inspiration from the legends and visual art of Northwest Coast First Nations, this beautifully illustrated story is ideally suited to children aged six to nine.

Cover of Orca's Family

This collection of west-coast fables combines the approach of Aesop with the oral tradition of First Nations storytellers. Woodpecker shows how to be a true friend. Beaver demonstrates how to achieve dreams through hard work. Rainbow Trout finds that all things in nature have a purpose.

Parents, grandparents and teachers will embrace Robert James Challenger’s stories, which, like all fables, promote cultural values and respect among generations.

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Students examine the First Nations of Canada in this fast-paced unit. Exciting activities range from Inuit string games to constructing a teepee. In general, students participate in meaningful activities associated with the theme of each lesson, which are followed by related student notes. This format helps to stress process rather than concentrating on memorization of factual information. Optional activities are also included, such as sign language, movie review of Pocahontas and Dances with Wolves. This Canada lesson provides a teacher and student section with a variety of reading passages, activities, crossword, word search and answer key to create a well-rounded lesson plan.
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Big Books for First Nations by Vera Trembach
B is for Bannock — M is for Moccasin — T is for Tipi. The stories featured in our resource are being enjoyed by children and teachers across Canada in both provincial and First Nations schools. Aboriginal children read about things that are familiar and non-Aboriginal children learn about the cultures of First Nations people. Students will learn about traditional foods, develop their listening skills, participate in letter sequencing activities and write an acrostic food poem. Included are patterns and text to make 3 big books: B is for Bannock — a recipe for bannock, patterns for big book and little book stories; Inside My Tipi — patterns for big and little book stories, creative writing pages; and M is for Moccasins. This Canada lesson provides a teacher and student section with reading passages, activities and recipes to create a well-rounded lesson plan.
 
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Secret of the Dance by Andrea Spalding
In 1935, a nine-year-old boy’s family held a forbidden Potlatch in faraway Kingcome Inlet. Watl’kina slipped from his bed to bear witness. In the Big House masked figures danced by firelight to the beat of the drum. And there, he saw a figure he knew. Aboriginal elder Alfred Scow and award-winning author Andrea Spalding collaborate to tell the story, to tell the secret of the dance.
Cover of Explore Native American Cultures!Explore Native American Cultures! with 25 Great Projects introduces readers to seven main Native American cultural regions, from the northeast woodlands to the Northwest tribes. It encourages readers to investigate the daily activities—including the rituals, beliefs, and longstanding traditions—of America’s First People. Where did they live? How did they learn to survive and build thriving communities? This book also investigates the negative impact European explorers and settlers had on Native Americans, giving readers a glimpse into the complicated history of Native Americans.
Readers will enjoy the fascinating stories about America’s First People as leaders, inventors, diplomats, and artists. To enrich the historical information, hands-on activities bring to life each region’s traditions, including region-specific festivals, technology, and art. Readers can learn Native American sign language and create a salt dough map of the Native American regions. Each project is outlined with clear step-by-step instructions and diagrams, and requires minimal adult supervision.
Cover of How Things Came to Be
From the origin of the caribou to how the sun and moon were formed, these tales in How Things Came to Be invite readers into the humor and wisdom of Inuit traditional mythology. With accessible stories and striking artwork, this work is a compilation of the most popular and important creation tales in the Inuit mythological canon for the whole family to enjoy.

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