Picture Books in Overdrive

PictureBooks

If you have yet to explore our picture book collection in Overdrive we suggest you take a look at all the amazing titles. We have highlighted just a few for you here to give you a small taste of what is available:

Baby Owl Rescue

Baby Owl’s Rescue by Jennifer Keats Curtis

What if you found a baby owl in your backyard? Would you know what to do? Where would you go to find help? Join young Maddie and Max as they learn a valuable lesson from a little lost owl in Baby Owl’s Rescue by Jennifer Keats Curtis. The brother and sister pair just wanted to play baseball one day. They never expected to come face-to-face with a wild animal! Lush illustrations by Laura Jacques accompany this story and demonstrate the proper treatment of wildlife. This story reminds all of us that we live in a world surrounded by wild animals, and those wild animals deserve our caution and our respect!

Bravest of the Brave

The Bravest of the Brave by Shutta Crum

Late one day I hurried home,
Stepping through the wood alone.
It was deep and dim; I could barely see.
But I thought brave thoughts to comfort me.

A Young Skunk heads home through the woods–alone. Or maybe not…
Could there be robbers, or pirates, or ghosts, or trappers in the woods? And is our hero brave enough to keep away?
With bouncy rhymes, charming art, a subtle counting theme, and a surprise ending, this story will entertain and reassure any child who’s ever been afraid.

Don't Spill the Milk

Don’t Spill the Milk by Stephen Davies

Over the uppy downy dunes, across the dark, wide river and up the steep, steep mountain, Penda lovingly carries a bowl of milk to her father in the grasslands. But will she manage to get it there without spilling a single drop?

Rocket Learned to Read

How Rocket Learned to Read by Tad Hills

Learn to read with this New York Times-bestselling picture book, starring an irresistible dog named Rocket and his teacher, a little yellow bird. Follow along as Rocket masters the alphabet, sounds out words, and finally . . . learns to read all on his own!

With a story that makes reading fun–and will even help listeners learn to read–this book is ideal for kindergarten classrooms and story hour or as a gift for that beginning reader. Fresh, charming art by Tad Hills, the New York Times bestselling author/illustrator of Duck & Goose, will make this a favorite.

Jessie's Island

Jessie’s Island by Sheryl McFarlane

As Jessie looks out over her island home, she sees a world of endless variety, from killer whales in the strait and bald eagles soaring overhead to anemones and tiny hermit crabs on the shore. She thinks of countless days spent exploring, fishing, swimming and canoeing. Told with lyric simplicity, this story is more than a celebration of West Coast life; it is also a reminder of the joy of childhood and the thrill of discovery. In a time when our children’s entertainment has become increasingly formal and high-tech, Jessie’s Island reminds us of the joy of unstructured play and the pleasures to be found in the natural world around us.

Katy No Pocket

Katy No Pocket by Emmy Payne

Katy Kangaroo is sad because she has no pocket in which to carry her son, Freddy. While all the other kangaroo children ride comfortably in their mothers’ pockets, poor Freddy has to walk. This makes Freddy sad, too, and tired! But one day Katy has an idea: why not find out how other animals carry their babies? She asks crocodiles, monkeys, and birds how they carry their children, but none of their methods seems to work. Finally, when the wise old owl suggests a plan, Katy and Freddy take off for the big city. There she finds enough pockets to carry Freddy and all of his friends!

Maggie's Chopsticks

Maggie’s Chopsticks by Alan Woo

Poor Maggie struggles to master her chopsticks — it seems nearly everyone around the dinner table has something to say about the “right” way to hold them! But when Father reminds her not to worry about everyone else, Maggie finally gets a grip on an important lesson.

No Dragons

No Dragons for Tea by Jean Pendziwol

In the first installment of the Dragon Safety Series, a dragon’s flame-filled tea party turns into a rhyming and reassuring lesson in fire safety.

Salmon Forest

Salmon Forest by David Suzuki

One fall day, Kate goes with her father, a fish biologist, to the river where he works — a river in the Pacific rain forest — the “salmon forest,” as he calls it. Together they watch the sockeye salmon returning to the river to spawn, and witness a bear scooping up a salmon. Next, Kate and her dad run into a Native boy named Brett and his family fishing at a pool in the river. From her adventures, Kate discovers how the forest and the salmon need each other and why the forest is called the salmon forest. David Suzuki and Sarah Ellis’s charming and informative text and Sheena Lott’s watercolors magically evoke the spirit and mystery of the West Coast rain forest.

Three Little Beavers

Three Little Beavers by Jean Heilprin Diehl

Beatrix the beaver longs to be good at something. Her brother Bevan is an expert at repairing the lodge with mud and twigs. Her sister Beverly is a superb swimmer and underwater gymnast. What makes Beatrix stand out? One day, she runs away by swimming up the creek and finds some fresh garden plants to eat, and yummy trees to gnaw. When her siblings set off to find her, all Three Little Beavers wind up trapped! It takes some simple engineering on the part of the humans who set the traps, and Beatrix’s discovery of her special talents, for the people and beavers to finally find a way to live in harmony.

Reviews by Overdrive

Comments

  1. Thanks for this list–I’m going to come back to this later today when I have a bit more time!

    Like

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