Summer Reading Basics

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Literacy skills are essential for student’s success, and we hope that by the end of third grade our students are understanding the written word, and reading with some fluency at grade level.  How do we make sure our students don’t fall behind?

As accountable parents and teachers we provide intervention where necessary, and try to close the gaps. Preventative factors are critically important in the early years if we want to make sure we don’t have to intervene.  Effective teaching instruction in the K-2 reading years is vital if we want to make sure our students gain the foundational skills needed for reading in the upper grades.

If we wait until our students show up in grades 4 and above, with discrepancies in their phonetic ability we are failing to prepare them for the high school years.  In grade 4 students should be reading books that have multi-syllable words.

Here are some summer reading tips for helping your younger K-2 student stay on task over the summer and beyond! Remember that for struggling students accelerating skill development to reach grade level expectations takes a high level of instructional intensity.  Offer lots of rewards and treats on a weekly basis!

1.  Log into our Overdrive E Library for some amazing picture books that now come with embedded audio content.  We have recently ordered many of the critically acclaimed Sonlight picture books.  If you have a student with reading difficulties make sure to turn on the Dyslexic font in the settings menu.  To find picture books go to our subject menu and click on Picture Books.

2.  Do daily practice with your Reading Eggs and RAZ Kids Subscription to ensure phonics, and reading comprehension is up to scratch.  Record your student reading at the beginning of the summer on RAZKids and then at the end of summer share with your teacher as a progress/assessment tool!  Contact Beth Johnson if you need to sign up for the coming year!

3.  Include multiple texts including manuals, graphs, infographics, video, and websites, signs and non-fiction to encourage your students’ wide interests.  Discover the awesome subscription Pebble Go for students K-4 to learn more about science and social studies.

4.  Play word games in the car on holiday.  Do you remember those old fashioned games like name the animal?

The Animal Name Game

Ages 6 and up: One person names an animal. Then each person in order has to name another animal (no repeating!) that starts with the last letter of the previous animal named. There are no winners or losers in this game. With older children, try the game with TV shows, or geographical categories such as cities or countries.

Twenty Questions

Ages 4 and up: One person secretly thinks of either an animal, mineral, or vegetable. The other players then take turns asking yes-or-no questions, such as “Can it fly?” or “Does it grow in the ground?” After the players have asked 20 questions, each player gets a chance to make a guess.

Telephone

Ages 4 and up: A child whispers a story to someone else in the car. That person whispers the same story — as close to a word-for-word recount as possible — to a third person, and so on. The last person to hear the story repeats it out loud so everyone can hear. Invariably, some of the story will have been lost in the translation, and the resulting garbled message usually inspires a good laugh.

The Alphabet Game

Ages 5 and up: One person chooses the right-hand side of the road, and someone else the left. Each player looks for letters of the alphabet that appear on signs or license plates on their side. The object of the game is to point out all the letters of the alphabet in order, from A to Z. The first person to spot the entire alphabet wins.

Help your student P.I.C.K. out the right book for their reading and interest level using this article for guidance!

If your student still needs intervention make sure to contact your teacher who can get your student the required scaffolding with diagnostic testing.  This method of intervention will help match your student to the right materials and his or her unique style of learning.  Feel free to contact me if you need suggestions for your student’s reading materials!

Blessings

Pippa

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