International Women’s Day – March 8th

Today is International Women’s Day and we thought it might be a great idea to share some of the literature we have in our Overdrive library that highlight great women in history and today! Here is a photo-essay of women around the world in their daily lives that your students may find interesting.

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Amelia to Zora: Twenty-six Women who Changed the World by Cynthia ChinLee

Twentysix amazing women; twentysix amazing stories. From Amelia Earhart, pilot and adventurer, to Zora Neal Hurston, writer and anthropologist, learn about the hardships and triumphs that inspired each woman to change her world and the world around her.

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Anne Frank: Tales from the Secret Annex by Anne Frank

Hiding from the Nazis in the “Secret Annexe” of an old office building in Amsterdam, a thirteen-year-old girl named Anne Frank became a writer. The now famous diary of her private life and thoughts reveals only part of Anne’s story, however. This book completes the portrait of this remarkable and talented young author.
Tales from the Secret Annex is a complete collection of Anne Frank’s lesser-known writings: short stories, fables, personal reminiscences, and an unfinished novel. Here, too, are portions of the diary originally withheld from publication by her father. By turns fantastical, rebellious, touching, funny, and heartbreaking, these writings reveal the astonishing range of Anne Frank’s wisdom and imagination–as well as her indomitable love of life. Anne Frank’s Tales from the Secret Annex is a testaments to this determined young woman’s extraordinary genius and to the persistent strength of the creative spirit.

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Exceptional Women Environmentalists by Frances Rooney

Severn Cullis-Suzuki, Canadian environmentalist and founder of the Environmental Children’s Organization, and Jane Goodall, famed primate researcher and advocate, are two of the ten women profiled here who are making a difference for our planet.

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I Am Malala by Malala Yousafzi

I Am Malala. This is my story.

Malala Yousafzai was only ten years old when the Taliban took control of her region. They said music was a crime. They said women weren’t allowed to go to the market. They said girls couldn’t go to school.

Raised in a once-peaceful area of Pakistan transformed by terrorism, Malala was taught to stand up for what she believes. So she fought for her right to be educated. And on October 9, 2012, she nearly lost her life for the cause: She was shot point-blank while riding the bus on her way home from school.

No one expected her to survive.

Now Malala is an international symbol of peaceful protest and the youngest ever Nobel Peace Prize winner. In this Young Readers Edition of her bestselling memoir, which has been reimagined specifically for a younger audience and includes exclusive photos and material, we hear firsthand the remarkable story of a girl who knew from a young age that she wanted to change the world — and did.

Malala’s powerful story will open your eyes to another world and will make you believe in hope, truth, miracles and the possibility that one person — one young person — can inspire change in her community and beyond.

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The Life of Helen Betty Osborne by David Alexander Robinson

Helen Betty Osborne dreamed of becoming a teacher. Sadly, her dream never came true. Helen left her home in Norway House, Manitoba, to attend Guy Hill Residential School in 1969. In September 1971, she entered Margaret Barbour Collegiate in The Pas, Manitoba. Two months later, on November 13, 1971, she was brutally murdered by four young, white men. Years later, the Aboriginal Justice Inquiry concluded that her murder was the result of racism, sexism, and indifference.

The Life of Helen Betty Osborne is a graphic novel about Betty’s life up to that tragic November day. Her story is told by a young boy named Daniel. The events in Betty’s story are true. The events in Daniel’s story represent our ability to change, learn, and grow.

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One Plastic Bag by Miranda Paul

Plastic bags are cheap and easy to use. But what happens when a bag breaks or is no longer needed? In Njau, Gambia, people simply dropped the bags and went on their way. One plastic bag became two. Then ten. Then a hundred.

The bags accumulated in ugly heaps alongside roads. Water pooled in them, bringing mosquitoes and disease. Some bags were burned, leaving behind a terrible smell. Some were buried, but they strangled gardens. They killed livestock that tried to eat them. Something had to change.

Isatou Ceesay was that change. She found a way to recycle the bags and transform her community. This inspirational true story shows how one person’s actions really can make a difference in our world.

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Ruth Law Thrills a Nation by Don Brown

In 1916 a young woman named Ruth Law attempted to fly from Chicago to New York City in one day—something no one else had ever done. This is the story of that daring attempt. Beautifully detailed watercolors dramatize a dangerous journey made by the pilot President Woodrow Wilson called “great.”

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Severn and the Day She Silenced the World by Janet Wilson

Severn Suzuki’s speech at the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio caught the attention of the world. As the daughter of environmentalist David Suzuki, Severn’s concern for the environment was fueled by a trip to the Amazon rainforest at age nine. Back home in Vancouver, she and her friends started ECO, the Environmental Children’s Organization, combining their efforts to raise enough money to travel to Rio. They couldn’t have imagined the effect they would have on the adults gathered there. More than twenty years later, Severn’s speech continues to receive thousands of hits on YouTube. Severn’s story is about the power that children have to create change when they work together, and how their voices can stand out above the politics and cynicism of adults.

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Shannon and the Dream for a School by Janet Wilson

The true story of Shannen Koostachin and the people of Attawapiskat First Nation, a native Cree community in Northern Ontario, who have been fighting for a new school since 1979 when a fuel spill contaminated their original school building. Shannen’s fight took her all the way to Parliament Hill and was taken up by children around the world. Shannen’s dream continues today with the work of the Shannen’s Dream organization and those everywhere who are fighting for the rights of Aboriginal children.

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