Summer Reading and the Books are Open!

Yes, it’s almost time to bring out the beach towels, and head for the sun and turf with our basket of books!  To stay on top of the reading lapse over summer, we have some awesome ideas to help you stay literate.  Catch these on Overdrive, which is open all summer long!


TEACHERS and PARENTS:

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT on OVERDRIVE

To discover a wonderful array of professional development resources, look no further than our Overdrive eLibrary.  You will find homeschooling books (philosophies),  teaching books, and different pedagogies including STEAM and Inquiry-based learning.  To access these materials click on Overdrive eLibrary under “Collections” and then under “Teacher Lounge“.


Here are some of our newer materials on Overdrive for you to enjoy, and catch up on all things Professional Development!

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In Hacking Education, Mark Barnes and Jennifer Gonzalez employ decades of teaching experience and hundreds of discussions with education thought leaders, to show you how to find and hone the quick fixes that every school and classroom need. Using a Hacker’s mentality, they provide one Aha moment after another with 10 Quick Fixes for Every School—solutions to everyday problems that any teacher or administrator can implement immediately.


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Something happens in students when they define themselves as makers and inventors and creators. They discover powerful skills—problem-solving, critical thinking, and imagination—that will help them shape the world’s future…our future. In Launch, John Spencer and A.J. Juliani provide a process that can be incorporated into every class at every grade level…even if you don’t consider yourself a “creative teacher.” And if you dare to innovate and view creativity as an essential skill, you will empower your students to change the world—starting right now.


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History of the English Bible is unknown to many people who regularly read scripture. It is a story of deprivation, perseverance, and achievement.

The Catholic Church had maintained a grip on the Bible for a thousand years, ensuring on pain of death that the Latin version was the only scripture available. In the late 1300’s and early 1400’s scholars and theologians began to rebel against the Church’s monopoly and began to produce ‘English’ Bibles, initially scribed laboriously by hand and using the Latin text ‘word for word’ as the source.

William Tyndale was a man with the divine mission to make the Bible accessible to the common Englishman. Not satisfied with the Latin Bible as his source, he went back to the original Hebrew and Greek and produced an English Bible. After years of evading capture Tyndale was arrested and in 1536 he was burnt at the stake as a heretic under the orders of the Church and King Henry VIII, but his legacy lives on in the English Bible which today still comprises nearly 90% of his beautiful, resonant translation.


STUDENTS:  SCIENCE and INQUIRY

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Lives of the Scientists

Scientists have a reputation for being focused on their work—and maybe even dull. But take another look. Did you know that it’s believed Galileo was scolded by the Roman Inquisition for sassing his mom? That Isaac Newton loved to examine soap bubbles? That Albert Einstein loved to collect joke books, and that geneticist Barbara McClintock wore a Groucho Marx disguise in public? With juicy tidbits about everything from favorite foods to first loves, the subjects of Kathleen Krull and Kathryn Hewitt’s Lives of the Scientists: Experiments, Explosions (and What the Neighbors Thought) are revealed as creative, bold, sometimes eccentric—and anything but dull.


Who Says Women Can’t be Doctors?  In the 1830s, when a brave and curious girl named Elizabeth Blackwell was growing up, women were supposed to be wives and mothers. Some women could be teachers or seamstresses, but career options were few. Certainly, no women were doctors.

In the 1830s, when a brave and curious girl named Elizabeth Blackwell was growing up, women were supposed to be wives and mothers. Some women could be teachers or seamstresses, but career options were few. Certainly, no women were doctors.

But Elizabeth refused to accept the common beliefs that women weren’t smart enough to be doctors, or that they were too weak for such hard work. And she would not take no for an answer. Although she faced much opposition, she worked hard and finally—when she graduated from medical school and went on to have a brilliant career—proved her detractors wrong. This inspiring story of the first female doctor shows how one strong-willed woman opened the doors for all the female doctors to come.

Who Says Women Can’t Be Doctors? by Tanya Lee Stone is an NPR Best Book of 2013


Eleven Experiments that Failed Is it possible to eat snowballs doused in ketchup–and nothing else–all winter? Can a washing machine wash dishes? By reading the step-by-step instructions, kids can discover the answers to such all-important questions along with the book’s curious narrator. Here are 12 “hypotheses,” as well as lists of “what you need,” “what to do,” and “what happened” that are sure to make young readers laugh out loud as they learn how to conduct science experiments (really!).

Is it possible to eat snowballs doused in ketchup–and nothing else–all winter? Can a washing machine wash dishes? By reading the step-by-step instructions, kids can discover the answers to such all-important questions along with the book’s curious narrator. Here are 12 “hypotheses,” as well as lists of “what you need,” “what to do,” and “what happened” that are sure to make young readers laugh out loud as they learn how to conduct science experiments (really!).

Jenny Offill and Nancy Carpenter–the ingenious pair that brought you 17 Things I’m Not Allowed to Do Anymore–have outdone themselves in this brilliant and outrageously funny book.


If I built a Car and If I built a House are both by Chris Van Dusen, introducing students to the art of making.

Young Jack is giving an eye-opening tour of the car he’d like to build. There’s a snack bar, a pool, and even a robot named Robert to act as chauffeur. With Jack’s soaring imagination in the driver’s seat, we’re deep-sea diving one minute and flying high above traffic the next in this whimsical, tantalizing take on the car of the future. Illustrations packed with witty detail, bright colors, and chrome recall the fabulous fifties and an era of classic American automobiles. Infectious rhythm and clever invention make this wonderful read-aloud a launch pad for imaginative fun.


Caroline’s Comets

Caroline Herschel (1750–1848) was not only one of the greatest astronomers who ever lived but also the first woman to be paid for her scientific work. Born the youngest daughter of a poor family in Hanover, Germany, she was scarred from smallpox, stunted from typhus and used by her parents as a scullery maid. But when her favorite brother, William, left for England, he took her with him. The siblings shared a passion for stars, and together they built the greatest telescope of their age, working tirelessly on star charts. Using their telescope, Caroline discovered fourteen nebulae and two galaxies, was the first woman to discover a comet and became the first woman officially employed as a scientist—by no less than the King of England! The information from the Herschels’ star catalogs is still used by space agencies today.


Enigma by Eric Walters

Having successfully foiled a Nazi plot to kidnap one of the British Royal Family, brothers Jack and George are on the move again—this time to England. The boys and their parents are traveling aboard a merchant ship that’s part of a convoy carrying supplies and troops to the battlefields of Europe at the request of the royal family, who wishes to thank them for rescuing Princess Louise.

Crossing the Atlantic is challenging enough … but when the destroyers attached to their convoy torpedo a U-boat, events take another very surprising turn. The U-boat was transporting a secret: a secret that Jack and George’s mother is now entrusted with … and a secret that the Nazis will kill to protect. When the family comes ashore in England, they’re whisked off to Bletchley Park, the hub of the British spy network, so that they can help to decipher it.


 

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