Remembering on November 11th

We are blessed to live in a country with so many freedoms.  As we are preparing for the “International Day of Prayer for the Persecuted Church”, we are reminded of the freedoms that are so important to us as Christians: the freedom of religion and of peaceful assembly.  Remembrance Day gives us opportunity to remember those who fought and died so that Canada could have these freedoms.

Remembrance Day Resources

  •  From the Learning Commons:

Remembrance Day Resources:  (A document with multiple resources listed for you to use in studying Remembrance Day topics)

  • From OverDrive:

On Remembrance Day”  by Eleanor Creasey

 “Remembrance Day” by Molly Aloian

By searching the topic “war”, I found many results, including a number of books relating to various wars in which Canada has participated.  For example:  “World War I:  Canada & the Great War” and “World War II:  Total War“, both by Doug Sylvester.

  • From Historica Canada:

http://education.historicacanada.ca/en/tools?utf8=%E2%9C%93&search=Remembrance+Day

  • From the Government of Canada:

This Veterans’ Week, #CanadaRemembers:  http://www.veterans.gc.ca/rememberthem?utm_source=rememberthem-2017

10 Quick Facts about Remembrance Day:  http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/remembrance/information-for/educators/quick-facts/remembrance-day

For educators – Resources:  http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/remembrance/information-for/educators

  • From Curio.ca  (find the link, username and password on your parent home page in Encom under “Curriculum Resources)

Remembrance Day:  In Memory of the Men and Women Who Have Served”  This collection features a selection of 29 stories marking this special day, in which we acknowledge the courage and sacrifice of those who served their country.  About half for ages 9-12 and half for ages 13-14, one for age 15-17.

Canada 150:  War and Peacekeeping”  This collection features 28 titles which look at the experiences of Canadian soldiers during the wars in which Canada has participated. It also examines the legacy of these wars, as well as Canadian participation in United Nations-led peacekeeping missions.  Mostly age 13-14, a few for 9-12 and 15-17.

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/shellorz/525925550

In Flanders Fields

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.
We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved, and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.
Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch, be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields

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