New on the Book Shelf in OverDrive!

We have some awesome new materials on OverDrive just in time for reading in front of that warm, cosy fireplace!  So head over to OverDrive eLibrary and immerse yourself in some awesome stories!

FICTION

“The War That Saved My Life” by Kimberley Brubaker Bradley

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#1 New York Times Bestseller
Newbery Honor Book
Winner of the Schneider Family Book Award (Middle School)
Wall Street Journal Best Children’s Books of 2015
New York Public Library’s 100 Books for Reading and Sharing

An exceptionally moving story of triumph against all odds set during World War II, from the acclaimed author of “Jefferson’s Sons” and for fans of “Number the Stars”.

Ten-year-old Ada has never left her one-room apartment. Her mother is too humiliated by Ada’s twisted foot to let her outside. So when her little brother, Jamie, is shipped out of London to escape the war, Ada doesn’t waste a minute—she sneaks out to join him.

This begins a new adventure for Ada, and for Susan Smith, the woman who is forced to take in the two kids. As Ada teaches herself to ride a pony, learns to read, and watches for German spies, she begins to trust Susan—and Susan begins to love Ada and Jamie. But in the end, will their bond be enough to hold them together through wartime? Or will Ada and her brother fall back into the hands of their cruel mother?

This masterful work of historical fiction is equal parts adventure and a moving tale of family and identity—a classic in the making.


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“Seeds of Time” by KC Dyer (BC author)

Thirteen-year-old Darrell Connor is a troubled girl, still haunted by the motorcycle accident that took her father’s life, and part of her leg, three years ago. She is not pleased when her worried mother sends her to board at Eagle Glen School for the summer.

But there is a sense of mystery at the school that appeals to Darrell, and as she investigates, she finds adventure and begins to form a few tentative friendships. When she stumbles upon a passage through time, she begins to wonder – is it possible to change her own past?


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“Nativity” by Cynthia Rylant

In the spirit of her acclaimed “Dog Heaven” and “Cat Heaven”, Newbery Medalist Cynthia Rylant illustrates the nativity story in her powerful folk art style.
Cynthia Rylant takes the beloved text of the nativity story, as told in the King James Bible, and lovingly illustrates it in her simple, but bold, style that has been called “stunning” by “School Library Journal”. As she did with the creation story, Rylant has created a sublime take on a classic story that will appeal to readers of all ages.


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“The Trumpeter of Krakow” by Eric P. Kelly

For well over thirty years, Eric P. Kelly’s Newbery Award winner has brought the color and romance of ancient times to young readers. Today, “The Trumpeter of Krakow” is an absorbing and dramatic as when it was first published in 1928.

There was something about the Great Tarnov Crystal….Wise men spoke of it in hushed tones. Others were ready to kill for it. Now a murderous Tartar chief is bent on possessing it. But young Joseph Charnetski is bound by an ancient oath to protect the jewel at all costs.

When Joseph and his family seek refuge in medieval Krakow, they are caught up in the plots and intrigues of alchemists, hypnotists, and a dark messenger of evil. Will Joseph be able to protect the crystal, and the city, from the plundering Tartars?


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“The Second Mrs. Gioconda” by e.l.konigsburg

Why did Leonardo da Vinci lavish three years on painting the second wife of an unimportant merchant when all the nobles of Europe were begging for a portrait from his hand? In E. L. Konigsburg’s intriguing novel, the answer lies with the complex relationship between the genius, his morally questionable young apprentice, and a young duchess whose plain features belie the sensitivity of her soul.

NON FICTION

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“Planetary Science:  Explore New Frontiers” by Matthew Brenden Wood

What do you see when you look up into the sky at night? The moon, stars, maybe even a comet or asteroid? You can also see other planets! In “Planetary Science: Explore New Frontiers”, readers ages 12 to 15 embark on a journey through the solar system and beyond, exploring planets, moons, dwarf planets, exoplanets and everything in-between. For many ancient cultures, planets were mysterious objects that moved against the backdrop of the heavens in strange but predictable patterns. Ever since Galileo Galilei first used a telescope to explore the moons of Jupiter, we’ve known that the planets are much more than mysterious points of light in the night sky. With the creation of incredible technologies such as space probes, giant ground-based telescopes, and Earth-orbiting observatories, we’ve learned that Mars once had water on its surface, that Jupiter’s Great Red Spot has been churning for centuries, and that thousands of exoplanets circle distant suns. “Planetary Science” is also exciting because of what we don’t know. Was there ever life on Mars? Is Planet Nine lurking in the outer reaches of the solar system? Will we ever find another Earth? How far can we go? In “Planetary Science”, readers examine the latest information on Pluto, the discoveries of the Mars rover Curiosity, and the incredible catalog of distant planets uncovered by the Kepler Space Telescope. They learn about how planets are formed, and why they travel on their orbits. Planets, those pinpricks of light you might spot on a clear night, come closer through informative illustrations, links to online primary sources, illuminating sidebars and fun facts, and hands-on, in-depth activities, such as building scale models of planets, hunting for alien worlds through citizen science, and crafting a comet in the kitchen. “Planetary Science” also promotes critical thinking skills through inquiry, discovery, and research by encouraging readers to explore questions that remain unanswered, such as whether Mars once had life or the possibility of a ninth planet hiding in the furthest reaches of the solar system. With discoveries being made almost every day, it’s an exciting time to be a planetary scientist!

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“Plastic Ahoy:  Investigating the Great Pacific Garbage Patch” by Patricia Newman (Gr 4-8)

Plastic: it’s used to make everything from drink bottles and bags to toys and toothbrushes. But what happens when it ends up where it doesn’t belong—like in the Pacific Ocean? How does it affect ocean life? Is it dangerous? And exactly how much is out there? A team of researchers went on a scientific expedition to find out. They explored the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, where millions of pieces of plastic have collected. The plastic has drifted there from rivers, beaches, and ocean traffic all over the world. Most of it has broken down into tiny pieces the size of confetti.

For nearly three weeks at sea, researchers gathered bits of plastic and ocean organisms. These samples helped them learn more about the effects of plastic in the ocean. Follow along on the expedition to find out how scientists studied the Garbage Patch—and what alarming discoveries they made.


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“The Truth About Stories” by Thomas King  (Gr. 9-12)

In his 2003 CBC Massey Lectures, award-winning author and scholar, Thomas King, illuminates North America’s relationship with its Aboriginal people. He is also winner of the 2003 Trillium Book Award.

“Stories are wondrous things,” declares King in his 2003 CBC Massey Lectures, “And they are dangerous.” Beginning with a traditional Native oral story, King weaves his way through literature and history, religion and politics, popular culture and social protest, gracefully elucidating North America’s relationship with its Native people. Native culture has deep ties to storytelling, and yet no other North American culture has been the subject of more erroneous stories. The Indian of fact, as King says, bears little resemblance to the literary Indian, the dying Indian, the construct so powerfully and often destructively projected by White North America. With keen perception and wit, King illustrates that stories are the key to, and only hope for, human understanding. He compels us to listen well.


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“DK findout! Coding”  Series DKfindout!

Discover the amazing power of computer programming, and how it is all around us, with this exciting book full of amazing images, fun quizzes, and incredible information.

Learn why we use code, how computers interpret code and the history of coding from Ada Lovelace and early programming languages to today’s Python and Scratch. Supporting STEM education initiatives, this book will get kids excited about programming and eager to go from browsing to building.

Filled with colorful images and quirky facts, “DKfindout! Coding” is engaging and educational.

Learn more about computer coding – or anything else – at www.dkfindout.com, a free educational website for kids to have fun with information and expand their knowledge.


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“Explore The Ice Age with 25 Great Projects” by Cindy Blobaum

Brrr…does it feel cold? Get out your gloves and get ready to experience the Ice Age! In “Explore the Ice Age! with 25 Great Project”, readers ages 7-10 discover what an ice age consists of, why we have them, and what effect an ice age has on living organisms and ecosystems, paying particular attention to the most recent Ice Age, which is the only one humans were around to witness. About 12,000 years ago, glaciers up to 2 miles tall covered up to one-third of Earth’s land! Explore how these moving mountains of ice changed almost everything on Earth, including shorelines, weather, plants, animals and human activities, migration, and more. Learn the science and techniques of archeological and paleontological digs to understand how we know so much about a time that happened before recorded history. Science-minded activities lead readers to discover what a world covered in ice means for the earth’s crust, its atmosphere, and what happens when the planet begins to warm and the ice melts. Projects include creating mini glaciers to move mountains and create beaches, and recreating the lifestyles of Paleolithic people to discover what they ate, how they hunted, how they made tools and clothes and their history in art. Don’t wait for the next ice age to get started! Cartoon illustrations, fun facts, and a compelling narrative make “Explore the Ice Age!” an essential part of any STEM library.

Comments

  1. Carolyn Kaiser says:

    ​Thanks for getting the JFK book Pippa!

    In HIs grace and grip,
    Carolyn Kaiser
    Heritage Christian Online School
    SE and Support Teacher
    778-953-2273
    ________________________________

    Like

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