Cool Things to Study with eBooks

/Cool Things to Study with eBooks
Cool Things to Study with eBooks2018-08-01T15:54:25+00:00

Themed Resources on OverDrive eLibrary

On February 16th, 1923 the Tomb of King Tutankhamen was opened by British Egyptologist Howard Carter. It was a great day for archaeology and the study of Ancient Egypt. You can find more information on King Tutankhamen here and information on his tomb here.

To help you with your own discoveries here are some books in our e-library for your study of Ancient Egypt!

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100 Facts about Ancient Egypt

Be a Pharaoh for a day and visit the land of the pyramids and the mummies! Discover everything you need to know about ancient Egypt with this brilliant book. One hundred facts, fantastic illustrations and hilarious cartoons give you the inside story on Egyptian life, while fun quizzes test your knowledge. So what are you waiting for? Get reading!

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Great Ancient Egypt Projects

From reed boats, papyrus, and amulets, to pyramids, pharaohs, and mummies, Great Ancient Egypt Projects You Can Build Yourself explores the fascinating lives of ancient Egyptians through more than 25 hands-on building projects and activities. Great Ancient Egypt Projects You Can Build Yourself gives readers today a chance to experience how the ancient Egyptians lived, cooked, worked, worshipped, entertained themselves, and interacted with their neighbours through building projects that use common household supplies.
Detailed step-by-step instructions, diagrams, and templates for creating each project are combined with historical facts and anecdotes, biographies, and trivia for the real-life models of each project. Together they give kids a first-hand look at daily life in ancient Egypt.

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Explore Ancient Egypt

Pyramids, mummies, amulets, temples, and pharaohs— Explore Ancient Egypt! brings this fascinating civilization to young readers ages 6–9 with 25 hands-on projects, activities, and games. Kids learn about ancient Egyptian homes, food, money, toys, games, makeup, clothes, kings, mummies, and more. Projects are easy to follow and require primarily common household products and very little adult supervision.
Activities range from making a scarab necklace to writing in ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs and making King Tut sandals. By combining a hands-on element with riddles, jokes, facts, and comic cartoons, kids Explore Ancient Egypt! in this accessible introduction to an incredible, ancient world.

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Ancient Egyptians and Their Neighbours

Want to speak Hittite? Hold out a glass and ask for “wa-tar.” This unique activity book for children ages nine and up shows what life was like among the Nubians, Mesopotamians, Hittites, and their neighbours the Egyptians from around 3100 B.C., when Upper and Lower Egypt became one kingdom, to the death of Queen Cleopatra under the Romans, in 30 B.C. Projects such as building a Nubian irrigation machine, creating a Mesopotamian cylinder seal out of clay, making kilts like those worn by Egyptian boys and men, and writing in Hittite cuneiform help young readers to connect with these ancient cultures and see how profoundly they have influenced our own.

Ancient Rome

Ancient Rome by Britannica Publishing

Amidst constant warfare and surges of cultural achievement, ancient Rome luxuriated in the splendours of its conquests and the glory of its Empire. Under the powerful direction of such leaders as Julius Caesar and Augustus, Rome secured its legacy as a foundation for much of the modern Western world. This provocative volume examines the many advances in governance, law, and engineering attributed to the Roman Empire as well as the individuals who shaped its military and cultural trajectory.

Classical Kids

Classical Kids by Laurie Carlson

Travel back in time to see what life was like in ancient Greece and Rome while having fun with hands-on activities such as making a star gazer; chiseling a clay tablet; weaving Roman sandals; making a Greek mosaic; creating Roman jewelry; throwing Greek pottery; casting a vote in a Roman-style election; and much more. Learn how these civilizations contributed to our present-day world by participating in art, math, cooking, science, and geography activities. Interesting facts and trivia are included throughout. Helpful illustrations explain project steps.

World Civilizations

World Civilizations and Cultures by Don Blattner

Bring history to life for students in grades 5 and up using World Civilizations and Cultures! This 96-page book features reading selections and assessments that utilize a variety of questioning strategies, such as matching, true or false, critical thinking, and constructed response. Hands-on activities, research opportunities, and mapping exercises engage students in learning about the history and culture of civilizations around the world. For struggling readers, the book includes a downloadable version of the reading selections at a fourth- to fifth-grade reading level. This book aligns with state, national, and Canadian provincial standards.

Bronze Bow

The Bronze Bow by Elizabeth George Speare

In this Newbery Medal-winning novel, Daniel bar Jamin is fired by only one passion: to avenge his father’s death by crucifixion by driving the Roman legions from his land of Israel. He joins an outlaw band and leads a dangerous life of spying, plotting, and impatiently waiting to seek revenge. Headstrong Daniel is devoid of tenderness and forgiveness, heading down a destructive path toward disaster until he hears the lessons taught by Jesus of Nazareth. With a brand new cover, young readers won’t be able to pass up this timeless tale.

Eagle of the Ninth

Eagle of the Ninth by Rosemary Sutcliff

Roman Britain: Marcus Flavius Aquila, a young centurion is forced into retirement after a wound in his first major engagement against a rebel British tribe. It allows him the freedom to embark upon a dangerous mission to find out what happened to the Ninth Legion which, years before, disappeared in the savage lands of the Picts. Will he find out what happened to the men, led by his father, who never returned? And will he recover the Eagle, the symbol of Roman dominance and power? This junior classic has never been out of print since it was first published over fifty years ago. It is now presented in a fresh abridgement read in an exciting manner by Charlie Simpson.

Julius Caesar

Julius Caesar Cliffs Complete by Diana Sweeny

Dramatizing the political battles in Rome during the height of the Pax Romanum, Shakespeare pits Caesar against an untold number of conspirators and lets the daggers fly. Antony comes in at the end to clean up the mess and carry on the rule of the Caesars. The CliffsComplete Julius Caesar is a revised and expanded study edition. It contains Shakespeare’s original play, a glossary, and expert commentary in a unique, 2-column format. To enhance your learning, notes and definitions appear directly opposite the line in which they occur, and a review section follows the play. This edition also introduces you to the life, works, and times of William Shakespeare.

Learning About Animals

Learning About Animals by Evan Moor (Grades K-1)

Learning About Animals covers concepts that address National Science Education Standards. Concepts covered include: animals are living things; living things are alike in many ways there are many kinds of animals; animals live in different habitats; an animal’s body and behaviors help it survive in its environment animals are many sizes animals are many colors animals’ bodies have different kinds of coverings animals have different types of appendages animals find and eat food in different ways animals have different methods of self-defense animals need air, food, and water; animals depend on plants for food animals grow and change; animals look like their parents A variety of engaging activities present the concepts in ways that young students can understand. Each concept presented includes teacher directions for lessons reproducible resource pages such as sets of picture cards, minibooks, and lab sheets to record the results of hands-on investigations.

Animal Classification

Animal Classification by 1st Grade Fireworks (Teacher’s Notebook) (Grades K-2)

Animal Classification and Writing Mini-Unit. Includes: Cover for Unit folder. Graphic Organizers for writing about each type of animal. Fill-in charts for use in discussions and/or readings Lined pap

Animal Classification and Writing Mini-Unit.
Includes:
Cover for Unit folder.
Graphic Organizers for writing about each
type of animal.
Fill-in charts for use in discussions and/or readings
Lined paper for sloppy copies & final drafts.
(Multiple types of papers for many grade levels)
Editing Self-check papers.

Animals in Fall

Animals in Fall by Martha E.H. Rusted (Grades K-2)

Honk! Geese are flying south. Grr! Black bears are looking for a den. Munch! Deer are eating extra food. Find out what other animals do to get ready for winter. What happens in fall? Find out in the Fall’s Here! series, part of the Cloverleaf Books™ collection. These nonfiction picture books feature kid-friendly text and illustrations to make learning fun!

Awesome Animals of Canada

Awesome Animals of Canada (Rainbow Horizons Publishing) by Vera Trembach (Grades 2-3)

Awesome Animals is a resource package about some of the animals of Canada. Upon completion, your students will have retained factual information about Canadian wildlife, be aware of environmental issues and discover an empathy towards animals. Creative Task Cards have been developed for independent learning. Skills covered in our resource are Creative Thinking and Problem Solving, Communication, Numerical Literacy, and Social Values. Topics covered in our resource are Animal Homes, Adapting to the Environment, Pollution, Conservation, Forest Fires, Animal Babies, and Animal Characteristics and Comparisons. This Animal Science lesson provides a teacher and student section with reading passages, activities, board game, and word search to create a well-rounded lesson plan.

Animal Life Cycles

Animal Life Cycles (Rainbow Horizon Publishing) by Natalie Reiger (Grades 2-3)

Our “Animal Life Cycles” unit looks at the life cycles of ten different animals. It studies two different mammals, reptiles, amphibians, birds and insects. Children learn how these animals live, plus how they grow and change as they move from young animals to adults. Children practice their reading and writing skills as they read and learn about the different animals. They use their knowledge to answer a number of questions. Animals studies are Black Bears, Blue Whales, Turtles, Garter Snakes, Frogs, Salamanders, Canada Geese, Penguins, Ladybugs, and Honeybees. Also included in this unit are: Animal Fact Cards, Research Outline, Final Report Outline, Match Game, Riddles, Unit Test and Unit Evaluation. This Animal Science lesson provides a teacher and student section with a variety of reading passages, lessons, activities, crossword and word search to create a well-rounded lesson plan.

Salmon Forest

Salmon Forest by David Suzuki (Grades K-3)

One fall day, Kate goes with her father, a fish biologist, to the river where he works — a river in the Pacific rainforest — the “salmon forest,” as he calls it. Together they watch the sockeye salmon returning to the river to spawn and witness a bear scooping up a salmon. Next, Kate and her dad run into a Native boy named Brett and his family fishing at a pool in the river. From her adventures, Kate discovers how the forest and the salmon need each other and why the forest is called the salmon forest. David Suzuki and Sarah Ellis’s charming and informative text and Sheena Lott’s watercolours magically evoke the spirit and mystery of the West Coast rainforest.

Animal Reports

Animal Reports by Johnson Creations (Grades 2-4)

This packet will help your students become successful report writers! Included are two parent letters, two animal report planning sheets, two web sheets, two covers, a full sheet of lines, a Glossary page, a Table of Contents page, eleven topic pages to choose from and a blank topic page.

Charlottes Web

Charlotte’s Web Audiobook by E.B. White (Grades 3-4) Novel Study

Since its publication in 1952, Charlotte’s Web has become one of America’s best-loved children’s books. For fifty years, this timeless story of the pig named Wilbur and the wise spider named Charlotte who saved him has continued to warm the hearts of readers everywhere. Now this classic, a 1953 Newbery Honor book, comes to life in a delightful unabridged recording, read lovingly by the author himself.

Burgess Animal Book

The Burgess Animal Book for Children by Thonton Burgess (Grades K-4 – read aloud)

Abundantly illustrated, simply written classic by a master storyteller acquaints youngsters with the habits and characteristics of four-footed animals. Porcupines, field mice, squirrels, coyotes, and other creatures take on appealing personalities in informative, entertaining tales about the inhabitants of the Green Forest and beyond. 73 illustrations.

Owl in the Family

Owls in the Family by Farley Mowat Novel Study (Grades 3-4) and Novel Study (Grades 4-7)

Every child needs to have a pet. No one could argue with that.

But what happens when your pet is an owl, and your owl is terrorizing the neighbourhood?

In Farley Mowat’s exciting children’s story, a young boy’s pet menagerie — which includes crows, magpies, gophers and a dog — grows out of control with the addition of two cantankerous pet owls. The story of how Wol and Weeps turn the whole town upside down is warm, funny, and bursting with adventure and suspense.

Ginger Pye

Ginger Pye by Eleanor Estes (Grades 4-8)

Meet Ginger Pye, the smartest dog you’ll ever know. Jerry Pye and his sister, Rachel, feel pretty smart themselves for buying Ginger. It was the best dollar they ever spent. Ginger steals everybody’s heart . . . until someone steals him!

Mr. Poppers Penguins

Mr. Popper’s Penguins by Richard and Florence Atwater Novel Study (Grades 5-6)

Mr. Popper has penguins in his fridge, an ice rink in the basement, and a family for whom life will never be the same

How many penguins in the house is too many? Mr. Popper is a humble house painter living in Stillwater who dreams of faraway places like the South Pole. When an explorer responds to his letter by sending him a penguin named Captain Cook, Mr. Popper and his family’s lives change forever. Soon one penguin becomes twelve, and the Poppers must set out on their own adventure to preserve their home.

First published in 1938, Mr. Popper’s Penguins is a classic tale that has enchanted young readers for generations.

This ebook features an illustrated biography of Richard and Florence Atwater including rare photos from the authors’ estate, as well as two videos from Fox Entertainment: a brief documentary on the legacy of Mr. Popper’s Penguins and the complete 2011 motion picture trailer.

The Story of Doctor Dolittle

The Story of Dr. Doolittle by Hugh Lofting (5-8)

Respected physician John Dolittle swaps human patients for animal ones as his parrot Polynesia teaches him the secret of talking to the animals. His fame spreads and he travels to Africa to treat a monkey epidemic. Setting out with his favourite crew of creatures, Dolittle must face trial after trial; being shipwrecked, escaping the king of Jolligingki and figuring out what do do with a pushmi-pullyu, the shy two-headed gazelle-unicorn cross.

how-to-make-an-apple-pie-and-see-the-world-franceHow to Make an Apple Pie and See the World by Marjorie Priceman — An apple pie is easy to make…if the market is open. But if the market is closed, the world becomes your grocery store.  This deliciously silly recipe for apple pie takes readers around the globe to gather ingredients. First, hop on a steamboat to Italy for the finest semolina wheat. Then hitch a ride to England and hijack a cow for the freshest possible milk. And, oh yes! Don’t forget to go apple picking in Vermont!  A simple recipe for apple pie is included.

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P is for Passport:  A World Alphabet by Devin Schillian — Celebrating the diversity in our world while cherishing our similarities, P is for Passport takes readers on a whirlwind tour of all the delights of the globe. From the everyday concerns of people everywhere for such things as bread and currency to the wonders of our world such as deserts and volcanoes, Passport offers a fascinating variety of topics and ideas to explore.

Africa

Morocco

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The Butter Man by Elizabeth Alalou — While Nora waits impatiently for dinner, her father stirs up a story from his childhood. During a famine, Nora’s grandfather must travel over the mountains to find work so he can provide food for his family. While young Ali waits for his father’s return, he learns a lesson of patience, perseverance, and hope.

South Africa

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The Soccer Fence:  A Story of Friendship, Hope, and Apartheid in South Africa by Phil Bildner — In a country struggling with acceptance, hope can come in many different forms. As a boy, Hector loved playing soccer in his small Johannesburg township. He dreamed of playing on a real pitch with the boys from another part of the city, but apartheid made that impossible. Then, in 1990, Nelson Mandela was released from prison, and apartheid began to crumble. The march toward freedom in South Africa was a slow one, but when the beloved Bafana Bafana national soccer team won the African Cup of Nations, Hector realised that dreams once impossible could now come true.  This poignant story of friendship artfully depicts a brief but critical moment in South Africa’s history and the unique role that sports can play in bringing people together.

Antarctica/Arctica

233057_K_soft_cover_1.qxdKumak’s Fish:  A Tale of the Far North by Michael Bania — On a beautiful Arctic morning, Kumak looks out the window of his house at the sun rising over the frozen river. “Ahhh, spring,” says Kumak to his family. “The days are long, the nights are short, and the ice is still hard. Good day for fish.” Eager to give Uncle Aglu’s amazing hooking stick a try, Kumak packs up his family and heads out to go ice fishing. “Good day for fish!” they all agree. Hapless Kumak is the only one in his family without fish until the tug at the other end of his line incites a mighty battle. A clever ending reveals that the whale-sized fish that Kumak imagined was actually a line of small fish in tug o’ war position. Kumak reigns, and there’s plenty for everybody. Authentic details throughout the playful art and text, as well as endnotes on Inupiat fishing, provide young readers with a fascinating window into another culture in this follow-up to KUMAK’S HOUSE a 2003 Children’s Book Council Notable Trade Book in Social Studies.

Asia

China

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Ruby’s Wish by Shirin Yim — Ruby is unlike most little girls in old China. Instead of aspiring to get married, Ruby is determined to attend university when she grows up, just like the boys in her family. Based upon the inspirational story of the author’s grandmother and accompanied by richly detailed illustrations, Ruby’s Wish is an engaging portrait of a young girl who strives for more and a family who rewards her hard work and courage.

India

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Monsoon by Uma Krishnaswami — Children play, birds call, and grownups go about their business during the hot days of summer in northern India. But in the bustle of street and marketplace, everyone is watching, waiting for those magical clouds to bring their gift of rain to the land. Through the observations of one young girl, the scents and sounds, the dazzling colors and the breathless anticipation of a parched cityscape are vividly evoked during the final days before the welcome arrival of the monsoon.

Japan

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The Bicycle Man by Allen Say — The amazing tricks two American soldiers perform on a borrowed bicycle are a fitting finale for the school sports day festivities in a small village in occupied Japan.

Australia

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Over in Australia:  Amazing Animals Down Under by Marianne Berkes — Australian animals are unique. Their babies may be riding in mama’s pouch, or hitching a ride on daddy, piggy-back! Children will sing, clap and count to the rhyme of “Over in the Meadow” as they learn about wallabies, koalas, wombats, and more. Cut-paper illustrations add to the fun.

Europe

Italy

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Angelo by David Macaulay — High above the rooftops of Rome, Angelo begins his work restoring the façade of a once glorious church. There, among the sticks and feathers, he discovers a wounded bird. Angelo becomes the bird’s reluctant saviour. As the church nears completion, Angelo begins to worry about the future of his avian friend. “What will become of you? Where will you go . . . where will you . . . live?” he asks her. Through his artistry as a master craftsman he answers the questions for his humble friend and assures that he, himself will not be forgotten.

Poland

mrs-katz-and-tush-polandMrs. Katz and Tush by Patricia Polacco —  In this special Passover story, Larnel Moore, a young African-American boy, and Mrs. Katz, an elderly Jewish woman, develop an unusual friendship through their mutual concern for an abandoned cat named Tush. Together they explore the common themes of suffering and triumph in each of their cultures.

Spain

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Always an Olivia:  A Remarkable Family History by Carolivia Herron — An elderly black grandmother passes on the story of the family’s Jewish origins to her young granddaughter, Carol Olivia. As family members flee the Spanish Inquisition, are kidnapped by pirates and eventually sail to America, one daughter in each generation is given the name Olivia, from the Hebrew Shulamit meaning “peace,” to honor the Jewish part of their ancestry. Critically-acclaimed author Carolivia Herron (Nappy Hair) shares this engaging, multicultural tale is based on her own family’s heritage.

North America

Canada

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Good Night Canada by Adam Gamble — From the majestic Canadian Rockies to gushing Niagara Falls, this soothing nighttime board book includes many of Canada’s icons and scenic landmarks, including Stanley Park in Vancouver, icebergs in Newfoundland, streetcars in Toronto, Prince Edward Island, Bay of Fundy, British Columbia Parliament Buildings, Dinosaur Provincial Park, fishing boats, farms, wildlife, hockey, and so much more.

Mexico

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The Princess and the Warrior: A Tale of Two Volcanoes by Duncan Tonatiuh — Award-winning author Duncan Tonatiuh reimagines one of Mexico’s cherished legends.  Princess Izta had many wealthy suitors but dismissed them all. When a mere warrior, Popoca, promised to be true to her and stay always by her side, Izta fell in love. The emperor promised Popoca if he could defeat their enemy Jaguar Claw, then Popoca and Izta could wed. When Popoca was near to defeating Jaguar Claw, his opponent sent a messenger to Izta saying Popoca was dead.  Izta fell into a deep sleep and, upon his return, even Popoca could not wake her. As promised Popoca stayed by her side. So two volcanoes were formed: Iztaccíhuatl, who continues to sleep, and Popocatépetl, who spews ash and smoke, trying to wake his love.

United States

Follow the Drinking GourdFollow the Drinking Gourd by Jeanette Winter —  “Winter’s story begins with a peg-leg sailor who aids slaves on their escape on the Underground Railroad. While working for plantation owners, Peg Leg Joe teaches the slaves a song about the drinking gourd (the Big Dipper). A couple, their son, and two others make their escape by following the song’s directions. Rich paintings interpret the strong story in a clean, primitive style enhanced by bold colors. The rhythmic compositions have an energetic presence that’s compelling. A fine rendering of history in picture book format.”–(starred) Booklist

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Dare the Wind: 
The Record-breaking Voyage of Eleanor Prentiss and the Flying Cloud by Tracey Fern — Ellen Prentiss’s papa said she was born with saltwater in her veins, so he gave her sailing lessons and taught her how to navigate. As soon as she met a man who loved sailing like she did, she married him. When her husband was given command of a clipper ship custom-made to travel quickly, she knew that they would need every bit of its speed for their maiden voyage: out of New York City, down around the tip of Cape Horn, and into San Francisco, where the Gold Rush was well under way. In a time when few women even accompanied their husbands onboard, Ellen Prentiss navigated their ship to set the world record for speed along that route.

Grandfather's Journey

Grandfather’s Journey by Allen Say — A picture book masterpiece from Caldecott medal winner Allen Say … lyrical, breathtaking, splendid—words used to describe Allen Say’s Grandfather’s Journey when it was first published. At once deeply personal yet expressing universally held emotions, this tale of one man’s love for two countries and his constant desire to be in both places captured readers’ attention and hearts. Fifteen years later, it remains as historically relevant and emotionally engaging as ever.

South America

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Love and Roast Chicken: A Trickster Tale from the Andes Mountains by Barbara Knutson — One day, high in the Andes Mountains, Cuy the Guinea Pig is searching for wild spinach to eat when Tío Antonio the Fox comes in search of Cuy to eat! Tio Antonio thinks hes found dinner, but crafty Cuy has other plans. Quick-witted Cuy fools Tio Antonio not once, but three times. Combining striking wood block artwork with an authentic South American voice this sly trickster tale shows that clever thinking is key when you’re out-foxing the fox.

Columbia

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Waiting for the Biblioburro by Monica Brown — Ana loves stories. She often makes them up to help her little brother fall asleep. But in her small village there are only a few books and she has read them all. One morning, Ana wakes up to the clip-clop of hooves, and there before her, is the most wonderful sight: a traveling library resting on the backs of two burros‑all the books a little girl could dream of, with enough stories to encourage her to create one of her own.

Inspired by the heroic efforts of real-life librarian Luis Soriano, award-winning picture book creators Monica Brown and John Parra introduce readers to the mobile library that journeys over mountains and through valleys to bring literacy and culture to rural Colombia, and to the children who wait for the BiblioBurro.

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Learn About Your Favourite Artists, RaphaelLeonardo Da VinciJoseph William TurnerJohn James Audubon and Edouard Manet.  To help you learn more about these amazing artists and many more, take a look at the resources we have recently added into our Overdrive eLibrary.

Discovering Great Artists

Discovering Great Artists by MaryAnn F. Kohl

“Discovering Great Artists” has 75 great artists featured in 110 amazingly fun and unique quality art appreciation activities for children. They will experience the styles and techniques of the great masters, from the Renaissance to the Present. A brief biography of each artist is included with a fully illustrated, child-tested art activity, featuring painting, drawing, sculpture, photography, architecture, and more. Includes such greats as Da Vinci, Michelangelo, Rembrandt, Monet, Degas, Picasso, Van Gogh, Dali, Matisse, Pollock, and O’Keeffe. 1998 Benjamin Franklin Silver Award, 2002 Practical Homeschooling Reader Award. Full “click-to” resource guide at Bright Ring’s website to show each artist’s most famous works.
Some activity examples are:
Da Vinci – Invention Art
Michelangelo – Fresco Plaque
Rembrandt – Shadowy Faces
Monet – Dabble in Paint
Degas – Resist in Motion
Picasso- Fractured Friend
Van Gogh – Starry Night
Pollock – Action Splatter
1997 Benjamin Franklin Silver Award, Education
2003 Practical Homeschooling Award, 3rd Place
2007 Practical Homeschooling Reader Award in the art appreciation category, 3rd place.
2009 Practical Homeschooling Reader Award in the art appreciation category,1st Place

Monet Paints the Day

Monet Paints the Day by Julie Danneberg

A glimpse into a day of Claude Monet’s life shows the painter racing against changing light, the incoming tide, and the elements as he paints an ocean scene in the plein-air style. Based on a true incident, the story is enhanced by brief facts about Impressionist painting, Monet’s life, and excerpts from the painter’s letters and notes.

The Charlotte Series:

Charlotte in Giverny

Charlotte in Giverny by Joan McPhail Knight

It’s 1892 and Charlotte is bound for Monet’s famous artist colony in Giverny, France, where painters like her father are flocking to learn the new style of painting called Impressionism. In spite of missing her best friend, Charlotte becomes enchanted with France and records her colorful experiences in her journal. She makes new friends, plants a garden, learns to speak French, and even attends the wedding of Monsieur Monet’s daughter!

Illustrated with beautiful museum reproductions and charming watercolor collages, Charlotte in Giverny includes a French glossary as well as biographical sketches of the featured painters. This delightful journal of a young girl’s exciting year will capture readers’ imaginations and leave a lasting impression.

Charlotte in Paris

Charlotte in Paris by Joan McPhail Knight

It’s 1892. Charlotte and her family have lived abroad in the famous artist colony in Giverny, France, for a year, when an exciting invitation arrives. The celebrated impressionist Mary Cassatt is having an exhibition in Paris. While in Paris, Charlotte dines at a cafe on the Champs-Elysees, watches a marionette show in the Tuileries gardens and celebrates her birthday at the Eiffel Tower. Illustrated with stunning museum reproductions of works by artists such as Monet, Degas, Cassatt, Renoir and Rodin as well as lovely watercolor collages, this sequel to Charlotte in Giverny also includes biographical sketches of the featured painters. Charlotte’s charming scrapbook will leave fans of the first book, art lovers, Francophiles and readers of all ages shouting, “Vive Charlotte!”

Charlotte in London

Charlotte in London by Joan McPhail Knight

It’s 1895. Charlotte and her family came to France three years ago so that her father could learn to paint in the French style of Impressionism. Now they are travelling to London to see if the famous artist John Singer Sargent will paint Charlotte’s mother’s portrait. In London, Charlotte and her best friend, Lizzy, stay in their own room at the Savoy Hotel, attend a fancy dinner party with famous writers, watch boat races on the River Thames, learn about legendary London ghosts, and even visit a gipsy camp.

Illustrated with beautiful museum reproductions and exquisite watercolor paintings, the book also includes biographical sketches of the featured painters. This vibrant journal of Charlotte’s exciting journey will make any reader long for lovely London.

Lives of Artists

Lives of the Artists by Kathleen Krull

From Da Vinci to Warhol, each of these 20 artists is respectfully exposed for their idiosyncrasies as well as their contributions to the history of art. What they ate, what they wore, who they loved and who their friends were – it’s all here.

ARTISTS INCLUDED: Da Vinci, Michelangelo, Bruegel, Anguissola, Rembrandt, Hokusai, Cassatt, Van Gogh, Kollwitz, Matisse, Picasso, Chagall, Duchamp, O’Keeffe, Johnson, Dali, Noguchi, Rivera & Kahlo, Warhol

The Stories of the Mona Lisa

The Stories of the Mona Lisa by Piotr Bosany

Discover the history of modern and contemporary painting through the famous Mona Lisa!”Dad, will you tell me a story?” asks a little girl. “Sure,” artist Piotr Barsony responds. “I’ll tell you a story about a painting. And the Mona Lisa, the most beautiful painting in all the world, will be our subject.” Thus begins the fascinating history of modern painting through what many consider the most famous work in the history of art: the Mona Lisa by Léonardo De Vinci. Piotr acts as the museum guide for his young daughter throughout the book, taking us on a journey through an imaginary museum. He describes famous art movements and artists, including impressionism, cubism, expressionism, favism, minimalism, surrealism; Monet, Manet, Cézanne, Picasso, Bacon, Pollock, and more. All of the most famous painters of the modern and contemporary art movements are explained with their own Mona Lisa portraits, in their signature styles. Throughout the book, Piotr acts as a guide, explaining to his daughter (and the reader) each genre of paintings in a clear, simple, and entertaining way. By the end of the book, we discover that he’s actually the artist who’s been painting all those Mona Lisas—and the results are spectacular. The Stories of the Mona Lisa is the perfect book for any child who loves art, history, and a good story. 60 color illustrations.

These A-Z Alphabet books explore a variety of subjects that would interest both young and older students. From provinces to music, these books will inspire your students to make their own A-Z books on a topic that they know well!

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B is for Blue Planet: An Earth Science Alphabet by Ruth Strother

How much of Earth’s surface is covered by water? How do the northern lights get their colors? Planet Earth has been home to mankind for hundreds of thousands of years and while scientists have learned a lot about it, they’re still unravelling many of its mysteries. B is for Blue Planet: An Earth Science Alphabet explains what we do know about our planet and what more we have to learn. Examine Earth’s diverse ecosystems (deserts), discover geological wonders (karst caves), learn about weather phenomena (hurricanes), and much more. Ruth Strother has been in the publishing industry for more than twenty years and is the author of fifteen books for children.

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D is for Desert: A World Deserts Alphabet by Barbara Gowan

D is for Desert: A World Deserts Alphabet uses the alphabet to explore desert regions around the world, explaining the science behind what determines a desert and showcasing fascinating features and desert inhabitants. Budding scientists will traverse the rocky deserts of Mongolia astride the Bactrian camel, spy on the poisonous Gila monster and other lizards in the Sonoran Desert, discover geological wonders in Bryce Canyon National Park, and learn about desert weather phenomena such as dust storms and flash floods, and much more. A glossary of key desert-science terms and concepts is included.

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D is for Drum: A Native America Alphabet by Michael Shoulders

Did you know that natives of the Northwest used dried sharkskin to sand totem poles? Or that horses were called medicine dogs, because dogs had been used to aid in hunting before horses were introduced by Europeans? In “D is for Drum: A Native America Alphabet,” readers will get an A-Z introduction to the many customs and cultures of the first people of this beautiful land. Bison, teepees, Kachinas and dugout canoes will all help to paint a fascinating picture of the more than 500 indigenous tribes inhabiting the Americas.

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F is for French: A Quebec Alphabet by Elaine Arsenault

Founded in 1608, what city is one of the oldest in North America? Where and when was Canada’s first road built? What world-famous circus was the inspiration of Baie-Saint-Paul street performers? Discover the answers to these questions, along with other facts, in F is for French: A Quebec Alphabet. Readers young and old can romp the sandy beaches of Les Iles de la Madeleine, visit Montreal’s Space for Life (Canada’s largest natural science museum complex), brave the arctic cold in the Nunavik region, or sit back and enjoy the music at one of the many performances taking place at the Montreal International Jazz Festival.

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H is for Hockey by Kevin Shea

The great game of hockey is introduced from A to Z using simple language for the youngest reader. Topics include fans, goalie, ice, and jersey.

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I is for Island: A Prince Edward Island Alphabet by Hugh MacDonald

Located in the Gulf of St. Lawrence on the east coast of Canda, Prince Edward Island measures only 5,660 sq.km. But what this island province lacks in size, it more than makes up for in abundant natural beauty, as well the scope of its influence on Candian history. Combining poetry with informational text, PEI Poet Laureate Hugh MacDonald pays homage to the province’s natural splendors and proud history. Readers young and old can visit the home of Lucy Maud Montgomery of Anne of Green Gables fame, stroll the streets of historic Charlottetown, or paddle a kayak down the island’s nearly 100 named rivers.

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L is for Land of the Living Skies: A Saskatchewan Alphabet by Linda Aksomitis

Why is Saskatoon called the “Bridge City”? Who were the first inhabitants of Saskatchewan? Where can you find rare plants such as the Prickly Pear Cactus and the Gumbo Evening Primrose? Discover the answers to these questions, along with other facts, in L is for Land of Living Skies: A Saskatchewan Alphabet. Readers young and old can visit the RCMP Heritage Centre in Regina, study the rare flora and fauna of the Cypress Hills Forest Reserve, enjoy the music at the John Arcand Fiddle Fest, or sample the delights of the Qu’Appelle Valley. From the healing waters of Little Manitou Lake to the otherworldly spectacle of the Northern Lights, everyone will enjoy this alphabetical journey that showcases the riches of Saskatchewan. Linda Aksomitis’s young adult novel, Snowmobile Challenge, was a finalist for best children’s book in the 2003 Saskatchewan Book Awards.

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M is for Money: An Economics Alphabet by Michael Shoulders

This alphabet book brings the topic of economics down to a child’s level, using tangible examples and scenarios to explain complex ideas. M is for Money uses snappy rhymes and expository text to introduce subjects ranging from supply and demand to taxes. Dynamic and witty artwork brings each topic to life.

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M is for Mountie: A Royal Canadian Police Alphabet by Polly Horvarth

From the pageantry of the Musical Ride to the movie-good looks of the fictional Dudley Do-Right, the image of the handsome and stalwart Mountie has long been part of popular North American culture. But there’s more to being a member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police than wearing a red coat. It’s an important career law enforcement and public service. In M is for Mountie: A Royal Canadian Mounted Police Alphabet, award-winning author Polly Horvath explains the proud traditions and important work of Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Where do cadets go for training? Who is William Dempster and why is there a highway named after him? And what the reason for the red coat? After reading M is for Mountie, readers will have a better understanding of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing mission of Royal Canadian Mounted Police organization. Author Polly Horvath’s numerous books for children include the National Book Award-winning The Canning Season and Newbery Honor book Everything on a Waffle

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M is for Music by Kathleen Krull

Music and the alphabet have always gone together. Don’t kids learn their letters by singing the ABCs? But you’ve never seen—or heard—a musical alphabet like this one. Beloved tunes. Unusual instruments. Legendary virtuosos. From anthems to zydeco, the language of music and the music of language harmonize in one superb symphony. It’s a funky fusion for songsters of all ages! Includes endnotes.

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S is for Scientists: A Discovery Alphabet by Larry Verstraete

What clutter-busting need was behind the invention of the World Wide Web? Which stain-fighting chemical got its start when a lab assistant dropped a beaker on a lab floor? In S is for Scientists: A Discovery Alphabet, the origins behind some of the most important scientific discoveries are explored. Budding young scientists will learn what Galileo witnessed in a church that led to his theory of measurement; how biologist Rachel Carson’s book, Silent Spring, helped to spur the first call to action in the environmental movement; and why Ivan Pavlov’s study of a drooling dog laid the foundations for a new branch of psychology. From discoveries that fundamentally changed scientific methods to everyday inventions that are now taken for granted, S is for Scientists sheds light on the events and people who have shaped our lives today.

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T is for Territories: A Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut Alphabet by Michael Kusugak

In T is for Territories: A Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut Alphabet, acclaimed storyteller Michael Kusugak gives an A-Z tour of Canada’s three territories, the northern region of the country that is a giant in size, history, and culture. Young readers can kick up their heels at the Arctic Winter Games with sports such as the one-foot high-kick, listen to world-renowned storytellers at Whitehorse’s International Storytelling Festival, or experience Wood Buffalo National Park where sometimes visitors have to stop and wait for wildlife to get out of the way. Everyone will enjoy this alphabetical journey that showcases the riches of the territories.

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T is for Time by Roland Smith

T is for a Time Alphabet uses poetry and expository text to explore the concept of time, from explaining basic units of measurement to showcasing important scientific achievements. Topics include famous inventors (Albert Einstein and John Harrison) and important structures and landmarks (Kulkulkan Pyramid and Big Ben). Budding scientists will discover what world-famous stone structure is believed to be an early calendar, follow the voyages of explorer Ferdinand Magellan to better understand the International Date Line, and learn to tell time using the Zulu time system.

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V is for Von Trapp: A Musical Family Alphabet by William Anderson

From “Raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens” to “Doe, a deer, a female deer,” many people have grown up humming the tunes or singing the lyrics to the songs from the beloved movie The Sound of Music. But what is the real story behind the brave von Trapp family? V is for von Trapp: A Musical Family Alphabet gives a behind-the-headlines look at this real-life singing family made famous in the classic movie. Starting with their idyllic early life in Austria where their love of music and performing began, author William Anderson takes readers along on the family’s courageous mountaintop escape from Nazi authorities to their new life in America and the famous von Trapp family lodge in the Vermont hills. Meet determined Maria, the dashing Captain, and their talented children; the famous von Trapps whose life story captivated thousands and continues to inspire with its legacy of hope and achievement. Author, historian, and lecturer William Anderson did extensive research and interviews with the von Trapp family.

Bonhoeffer

Bonhoeffer by Eric Metaxas

WHO BETTER TO FACE THE GREATEST EVIL OF THE 20TH CENTURY THAN A HUMBLE MAN OF FAITH?

As Adolf Hitler and the Nazis seduced a nation, bullied a continent, and attempted to exterminate the Jews of Europe, a small number of dissidents and saboteurs worked to dismantle the Third Reich from the inside. One of these was Dietrich Bonhoeffer—a pastor and author, known as much for such spiritual classics as The cost of Discipleship and Life Together, as for his 1945 execution in a concentration camp for his part in the plot to assassinate Adolf Hitler.

In the first major biography of Bonhoeffer in forty years, New York Times best-selling author Eric Metaxas takes both strands of Bonhoeffer’s life?the theologian and the spy?to tell a searing story of incredible moral courage in the face of monstrous evil. In a deeply moving narrative, Metaxas uses previously unavailable documents?including personal letters, detailed journal entries, and firsthand personal accounts?to reveal dimensions of Bonhoeffer’s life and theology never before seen.

In Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy?A Righteous Gentiel vs the Third Reich, Metaxas presents the fullest accounting of Bonhoeffer’s heart-wrenching 1939 decision to leave the safe haven of America for Hitler’s Germany, and using extended excerpts from love letters and coded messages written to and from Bonhoeffer’s Cell 92, Metaxas tells for the first time the full story of Bonhoeffer’s passionate and tragic romance.

Readers will discover fresh insights and revelations about his life-changing months at the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem and about his radical position on why Christians are obliged to stand up for the Jews. Metaxas also sheds new light on Bonhoeffer’s reaction to Kristallnacht, his involvement in the famous Valkyrie plot and in “Operation 7,” the effort to smuggle Jews into neutral Switzerland.

Bonhoeffer gives witness to one man’s extraordinary faith and to the tortured fate of the nation he sought to deliver from the curse of Nazism. It brings the reader face to face with a man determined to do the will of God radically, courageously, and joyfully?even to the point of death. Bonhoeffer is the story of a life framed by a passion for truth and a commitment to justice on behalf of those who face implacable evil.

Chinese Cinderella

Chinese Cinderella by Adeline Yen Mah

A riveting memoir of a girl’s painful coming-of-age in a wealthy Chinese family during the 1940s.

A Chinese proverb says, “Falling leaves return to their roots.” In Chinese Cinderella, Adeline Yen Mah returns to her roots to tell the story of her painful childhood and her ultimate triumph and courage in the face of despair. Adeline’s affluent, powerful family considers her bad luck after her mother dies giving birth to her. Life does not get any easier when her father remarries. She and her siblings are subjected to the disdain of her stepmother, while her stepbrother and stepsister are spoiled. Although Adeline wins prizes at school, they are not enough to compensate for what she really yearns for — the love and understanding of her family.

Following the success of the critically acclaimed adult bestseller Falling Leaves, this memoir is a moving telling of the classic Cinderella story, with Adeline Yen Mah providing her own courageous voice. Includes 6-page photo insert.

The Cross and the Switchblade

The Cross and Switchblade by David Wilkerson

The astonishing true story of Wilkerson’s outreach to New York teens trapped by drugs and gangs. Gang-fighters! Drug addicts. Teenage runaways and prostitutes! The toughest and most hopeless kids that New York’s ghettos had to offer. Then a young preacher from the Pennsylvania hills arrived on their turf and began preaching a message of renewal, miracles, and God’s love. This is one of the century’s great true stories. Over 14 million copies in print!

Facing the Lion

Facing the Lion by Joseph Lemasolai Lekuton

Joseph Lemasolai Lekuton gives American kids a firsthand look at growing up in Kenya as a member of a tribe of nomads whose livelihood centers on the raising and grazing of cattle. Readers share Lekuton’s first encounter with a lion, the epitome of bravery in the warrior tradition. They follow his mischievous antics as a young Maasai cattle herder, coming-of-age initiation, boarding school escapades, soccer success, and journey to America for college. Lekuton’s riveting text combines exotic details of nomadic life with the universal experience and emotions of a growing boy.

Nelson Mandela

Nelson Mandela by Louis Hefland

Nelson Mandela is a man who changed the destiny of not just his country but of the world. There are few men who can dare to dream and realize it. Nelson Mandela is one such man, who dared to dream to make this world a better place and so he did.

Bold, Brave and Born to Lead

Bold, Brave and Born to Lead by Mary Beacock Fryer

Celebrated as the saviour of Upper Canada, Major General Sir Isaac Brock was a charismatic leader who won the respect not only of his own troops, but also of the Shawnee chief Tecumseh and even men among his enemy. His motto could well have been ‘speak loud and look big.’ Although this attitude earned him a reputation for brashness, it also enabled his success and propelled him into the significant role he would play in the War of 1812.

More Biographies about Canadians – Making it Home: The Story of Catherine Parr TrailCaring for a Colony: The Story of Jeanne Mance , To Stand and Fight Together: Richard Pierpoint and The Coloured Corps of Upper Canada and  Mapping the Wilderness: The Story of David Thompson

Last Airlift

Last Airlift by Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch

A true story about life in a Saigon orphanage, a dramatic rescue flight from Vietnam to Canada, adoption by a Canadian family, and growing up in Canada. Last Airlift is the true story of the last Canadian airlift operation that left Saigon and arrived in Toronto on April 13, 1975. Son Thi Anh Tuyet was one of 57 babies and children on that flight. Based on personal interviews and enhanced with archive photos, Tuyet’s story of the Siagon orphanage and her flight to Canada is an emotional and suspenseful journey brought to life by the award-winning children’s author, Marsha Skrypuch.

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Amelia to Zora: Twenty-Six Women Who Changed The World by Cynthia ChinLee

Twenty-six amazing women; twenty-six amazing stories. From Amelia Earhart, pilot and adventurer, to Zora Neal Hurston, writer and anthropologist, learn about the hardships and triumphs that inspired each woman to change her world and the world around her.

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Canadian Heroines by Merna Forster

In this special two-book bundle you’ll meet remarkable women in science, sport, preaching and teaching, politics, war and peace, arts and entertainment, etc. The book is full of amazing facts and fascinating trivia about intriguing figures. Discover some of the many heroines Canada can be proud of. Find out how we’re remembering them. Or not! Augmented by great quotes and photos, this inspiring collection profiles remarkable women — heroines in science, sport, preaching and teaching, politics, war and peace, arts and entertainment, and more. Profiles include mountaineer Phyllis Munday, activist Hide Shimizu, unionist Lea Roback, movie mogul Mary Pickford, the original Degrassi kids, Captain Kool, hockey star Hilda Ranscombe, and the woman dubbed “the atomic mosquito.”

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Exceptional Women Environmentalists by Frances Rooney

Severn Cullis-Suzuki, Canadian environmentalist and founder of the Environmental Children’s Organization, and Jane Goodall, famed primate researcher and advocate, are two of the ten women profiled here who are making a difference for our planet.

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Heroes of the Environment by Harriet Rohmer

This inspiring book presents the true stories of 12 people from across North America who have done great things for the environment. Heroes include a teenage girl who figured out how to remove an industrial pollutant from the Ohio River, a Mexican superstar wrestler who works to protect turtles and whales, and a teenage boy from Rhode Island who helped his community and his state develop effective e-waste recycling programs. Plenty of photographs and illustrations bring each compelling story vividly to life.

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Legends in Their Time by George Sherwood

A remarkable cast of past and present young Canadians stride across the pages of Legends In Their Time, each having a significant role to play in Canadian history. Beginning in the 1500s and moving on into the 20th century, each chapter contributes insights into the evolution of Canada as a nation.

Author George Sherwood’s thorough research and his scene-setting bring to life the heroic accomplishments and tragic exploits that make Canada’s story a fascinating and entertaining account. Included are explorer Etienne Brule; Osborne Anderson, survivor of Harper’s Ferry; inventor Armand Bombardier; human rights activist Toy Jin “Jean” Wong; and the heroic Terry Fox, to name but a few of the extraordinary lives that are chronicled. Complementing the text are historic photographs and original artwork by award-winning artist Stewart Sherwood.

“For those who think Canada lacks heroes or Canada does not honour its heroes, Legends In Their Time is the book for you. Extensively researched and written in an engaging style, it recognizes that heroes and heroines come in many forms, as shown in the richness of our history.”- John Myers, Teacher Educator, OISE/UT

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Lives of Extraordinary Women by Kathleen Krull

“Not all governments have been run by men. Lives of Extraordinary Women turns the spotlight on women who have wielded power, revealing their feats—and flaws—for all the world to see. Here you’ll find twenty of the most influential women in history: queens, warriors, prime ministers, first ladies, revolutionary leaders. Some are revered. Others are notorious. What were they really like?

In this grand addition to their highly praised series, Kathleen Krull and Kathryn Hewitt celebrate some of the world’s most noteworthy women, ranging from the famous to those whose stories have rarely been told.

Features twenty extraordinary women, including Cleopatra, Joan of Arc, Elizabeth I, Harriet Tubman, Eleanor Roosevelt, Eva Perón

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Lives of the Explorers by Kathleen Krull

You might know that Columbus discovered America, Lewis and Clark headed west with Sacajawea, and Sally Ride blasted into space. But what do you really know about these bold explorers? What were they like as kids? What pets or bad habits did they have? And what drove their passion to explore unknown parts of the world? With juicy tidbits about everything from favorite foods to first loves, Lives of the Explorers reveals these fascinating adventurers as both world-changers and real people.

The entertaining style and solid research of the Lives of . . . series of biographies have made it a favorite with families and educators for twenty years. This new volume takes readers through the centuries and across the globe, profiling the men and women whose curiosity and courage have led them to discover our world.

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Lives of the Scientists by Kathleen Krull

Scientists have a reputation for being focused on their work—and maybe even dull. But take another look. Did you know that it’s believed Galileo was scolded by the Roman Inquisition for sassing his mom? That Isaac Newton loved to examine soap bubbles? That Albert Einstein loved to collect joke books, and that geneticist Barbara McClintock wore a Groucho Marx disguise in public? With juicy tidbits about everything from favorite foods to first loves, the subjects of Kathleen Krull and Kathryn Hewitt’s Lives of the Scientists: Experiments, Explosions (and What the Neighbors Thought) are revealed as creative, bold, sometimes eccentric—and anything but dull.

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Our Earth: How Kids are Saving the Planet by Janet Wilson

Ten profiles of amazing young environmental activists. Each child is captured in a portrait, their achievements described, and filled out with photos. Ends with tips for kids to make a difference.

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Real Kids, Real Stories, Real Change by Garth Sundem

Inspire kids and teens to personal, community, and social action with this book of thirty true stories of young people overcoming adversity to achieve great things and make a difference around the world. Compelling, funny, inspiring, and poignant, the book features kids and teens who used their heads, their hearts, their character, their courage, and sometimes their stubbornness to help others and do amazing things. Inside you’ll find examples of youth volunteering, kids making a difference, and young people initiating community and social action to change their world. What makes these kids so special? Eleven-year-old Tilly saved the lives of 100 people in Thailand because she knew the warning signs of a tsunami. Ten-year-old Jean-Dominic won a battle against pesticides—and the cancer they caused in his body. Fifteen-year-old Malika fought against segregation in her Alabama town. Six-year-old Ryan raised over one million dollars to drill water wells in Africa. And thirteen-year-old Bethany, a competitive surfer, lost her left arm (and almost her life) to a shark, but got back on her surfboard.

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Trailblazers: An Illustrated Guide to the Women Who Explored the World by Lisa Graves

By land, sea, and air, women have travelled the globe, blazing a trail of exploration, discovery and empowerment.
This illustrated guide of explorers tells the incredible stories of the women who went against all odds to see the world and go beyond the limits set by their times.

The second title in Lisa Graves’ Women in History series, Trail Blazers is an indisputable resource for today’s children.

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Who Was? Series of Biographies:

Who Was Albert Einstein?

Who Was Nelson Mandela?

Who Was Alexander Graham Bell?

Who Was Alexander the Great?

Who Was Genghis Khan?

Who Was King Tut?

Who Was Isaac Newton?

Who Was Joan of Arc?

Who Was Steve Jobs?

Who Was Julius Caesar?

Who Was Mother Teresa?

Who Was Galileo?

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Women in Science by Rachel Ignotofsky

It’s a scientific fact: Women rock! 

A charmingly illustrated and educational book, New York Times bestseller Women in Science highlights the contributions of fifty notable women to the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) from the ancient to the modern world. Full of striking, singular art, this fascinating collection also contains infographics about relevant topics such as lab equipment, rates of women currently working in STEM fields, and an illustrated scientific glossary. The trailblazing women profiled include well-known figures like primatologist Jane Goodall, as well as lesser-known pioneers such as Katherine Johnson, the African-American physicist and mathematician who calculated the trajectory of the 1969 Apollo 11 mission to the moon.

Women in Science celebrates the achievements of the intrepid women who have paved the way for the next generation of female engineers, biologists, mathematicians, doctors, astronauts, physicists, and more!

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Alfred Nobel by Kathy-jo Wargin

Almost everyone has heard of the Nobel Prize, a collection of prizes awarded for accomplishments in science, medicine, literature, and peace. But few people know about the man who established the award and for whom it is named, Alfred Nobel. Alfred Nobel was born in Sweden in 1833. A quick and curious mind, combined with a love of science and chemistry, drove him to invent numerous technological devices throughout his long life. But he is perhaps most well known for his invention of dynamite. Intending it to help safely advance road and bridge construction, Nobel saw his most famous invention used in the development of military weaponry. After a newspaper headline mistakenly announces his death, Nobel was inspired to leave a legacy of another sort. The Man Behind the Peace Prize tells the story of the enduring legacy of Alfred Nobel.Kathy-jo Wargin is the bestselling author of more than 30 books for children. Among her many awards for her work are an International Reading Association Children’s Choice Award for The Legend of the Loon and an IRA Teachers’ Choice Award for Win One for the Gipper. She lives in the Great Lakes area. Zachary Pullen’s character-oriented picture book illustrations have won awards and garnered starred reviews. He has been honored several times with acceptance into the prestigious Society of Illustrators juried shows and Communication Arts Illustration Annual of the best in current illustration. Zachary lives in Wyoming.

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Ballet for Martha: Making Appalachian Spring by Jan Greenberg

A picture book about the making of Martha Graham’s Appalachian Spring, her most famous dance performance

Martha Graham: trailblazing choreographer

Aaron Copland : distinguished American composer

Isamu Noguchi : artist, sculptor, craftsman

Award-winning authors Jan Greenberg and Sandra Jordan tell the story behind the scenes of the collaboration that created APPALACHIAN SPRING, from its inception through the score’s composition to Martha’s intense rehearsal process. The authors’ collaborator is two-time Sibert Honor winner Brian Floca, whose vivid watercolors bring both the process and the performance to life.

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Barnum’s Bones – How Barnum Brown Discovered the Most Famous Dinosaur in the World by Tracey Fern

Barnum Brown’s (1873-1963) parents named him after the circus icon P.T. Barnum, hoping that he would do something extraordinary—and he did! As a palaeontologistt for the American Museum of Natural History, he discovered the first documented skeleton of the Tyrannosaurus Rex, as well as most of the other dinosaurs on display there today.
An appealing and fun picture book biography, with zany and stunning illustrations by Boris Kulikov, BARNUM’S BONES captures the spirit of this remarkable man.
Barnum’s Bones is one The Washington Post’s Best Kids Books of 2012.

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The Boy Who Drew Birds – The Story of John James Audubon by Melissa Sweet

John James Audubon was a boy who loved the out-of-doors more than the in. He was a boy who believed in studying birds in nature, not just from books. And, in the fall of 1804, he was a boy determined to learn if the small birds nesting near his Pennsylvania home really would return the following spring.

This book reveals how the youthful Audubon pioneered a technique essential to our understanding of birds. Capturing the early passion of America’s greatest painter of birds, this story will leave young readers listening intently for the call of birds large and small near their own homes.

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The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind by William Kamkwamba

The New York Times bestselling memoir of the heroic young inventor who brought electricity to his Malawian village is now perfect for young readers

When a terrible drought struck William Kamkwamba’s tiny village in Malawi, his family lost all of the season’s crops, leaving them with nothing to eat and nothing to sell. William began to explore science books in his village library, looking for a solution. There, he came up with the idea that would change his family’s life forever: he could build a windmill. Made out of scrap metal and old bicycle parts, William’s windmill brought electricity to his home and helped his family pump the water they needed to farm the land.

Retold for a younger audience, this exciting memoir shows how, even in a desperate situation, one boy’s brilliant idea can light up the world. Complete with photographs, illustrations, and an epilogue that will bring readers up to date on William’s story, this is the perfect edition to read and share with the whole family.

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The Boy Who Loved Math by Deborah Heiligman

Most people think of mathematicians as solitary, working away in isolation. And, it’s true, many of them do. But Paul Erdos never followed the usual path. At the age of four, he could ask you when you were born and then calculate the number of seconds you had been alive in his head. But he didn’t learn to butter his own bread until he turned twenty. Instead, hetravelledd around the world, from one mathematician to the next, collaborating on an astonishing number of publications. With a simple, lyrical text and richly layered illustrations, this is a beautiful introduction to the world of math and a fascinating look at the unique character traits that made “Uncle Paul” a great man.

The Boy Who Loved Math by Deborah Heiligman is a Kirkus Reviews Best Book of 2013 and a New York Times Book Review Notable Children’s Book of 2013.

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Cloth Lullaby by Amy Novesky

Louise Bourgeois (1911–2010) was a world-renowned modern artist noted for her sculptures made of wood, steel, stone, and cast rubber. Her most famous spider sculpture, Maman, stands more than 30 feet high .Just as spiders spin and repair their webs, Louise’s own mother was a weaver of tapestries. Louise spent her childhood in France as an apprentice to her mother before she became a tapestry artist herself. She worked with fabric throughout her career, and this biographical picture book shows how Bourgeois’s childhood experiences weaving with her loving, nurturing mother provided the inspiration for her most famous works. With a beautifully nuanced and poetic story, this book stunningly captures the relationship between mother and daughter and illuminates how memories are woven into us all.

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Dare the Wind – The Record-breaking Voyage of Eleanor Prentiss and the Flying Cloud by Emily Arnold McCully

Ellen Prentiss’s papa said she was born with saltwater in her veins, so he gave her sailing lessons and taught her how to navigate. As soon as she met a man who loved sailing like she did, she married him. When her husband was given command of a clipper ship custom-made to travel quickly, she knew that they would need every bit of its speed for their maiden voyage: out of New York City, down around the tip of Cape Horn, and into San Francisco, where the Gold Rush was well under way. In a time when few women even accompanied their husbands onboard, Ellen Prentiss navigated their ship to set the world record for speed along that route.

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Diego Rivera – His World and Ours by Duncan Tonatiuh

This charming book introduces one of the most popular artists of the twentieth century, Diego Rivera, to young readers. It tells the story of Diego as a young, mischievous boy who demonstrated a clear passion for art and then went on to become one of the most famous painters in the world.

Duncan Tonatiuh also prompts readers to think about what Diego would paint today. Just as Diego’s murals depicted great historical events in Mexican culture or celebrated native peoples, if Diego were painting today, what would his artwork depict? How would his paintings reflect today’s culture?

Diego Rivera: His World and Ours is a wonderful introduction to this great artist.

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Drum Dream Girl by Margarita Engle

Girls cannot be drummers. Long ago on an island filled with music, no one questioned that rule—until the drum dream girl. In her city of drumbeats, she dreamed of pounding tall congas and tapping small bongós. She had to keep quiet. She had to practice in secret. But when at last her dream-bright music was heard, everyone sang and danced and decided that both girls and boys should be free to drum and dream.
Inspired by the childhood of Millo Castro Zaldarriaga, a Chinese-African-Cuban girl who broke Cuba’s traditional taboo against female drummers, Drum Dream Girl tells an inspiring true story for dreamers everywhere.

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Edward Hopper Paints His World by Robert Burleigh

As a boy, Edward Hopper knew exactly what he wanted to be when he grew up: on the cover of his pencil box, he wrote the words EDWARD HOPPER, WOULD-BE ARTIST. He travelled to New York and to Paris to hone his craft. And even though no one wanted to buy his paintings for a long time, he never stopped believing in his dream to be an artist. He was fascinated with painting light and shadow and his works explore this challenge.

Edward Hopper’s story is one of courage, resilience, and determination. In this striking picture book biography, Robert Burleigh and Wendell Minor invite young readers into the world of a truly special American painter (most celebrated for his paintings “Nighthawks” and “Gas”).

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The Fantastic Undersea Life of Jacques Cousteau by Dan Yaccarino

Jacques Cousteau was the world’s ambassador of the oceans. His popular TV series brought whales, otters, and dolphins right into people’s living rooms. Now, in this exciting picturebook biography, Dan Yaccarino introduces young readers to the man behind the snorkel.

From the first moment he got a glimpse of what lived under the ocean’s waves, Cousteau was hooked. And so he set sail aboard the Calypso to see the sea. He and his team of scientists invented diving equipment and waterproof cameras. They made films and televisions shows and wrote books so they could share what they learned. The oceans were a vast unexplored world, and Cousteau became our guide. And when he saw that pollution was taking its toll on the seas, Cousteau became our guide in how to protect the oceans as well.

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Galileo’s Leaning Tower Experiment by Wendy MacDonald

When the scientist Galileo befriends a bright farm boy, Massimo, the two begin to investigate the science of motion.

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George Ferris, What a Wheel by Barbara Lowell

Have you ever ridden a Ferris wheel? You go up, up, up and can see for miles! But when the inventor of the Ferris wheel, George Ferris, first pitched the idea, everyone thought he was crazy. A 250-foot bicycle wheel that goes around and around and carries people in train cars? Can’t be done, they said. But George proved them wrong. Read about how George’s hard work, courage, and imagination created one of the most famous fair rides today.
George Ferris, What a Wheel covers the concepts Imagination and Problem Solving.

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If You Spent a Day with Thoreau at Walden Pond by Robert Burleigh

In 1845 in Concord, Massachusetts, Henry David Thoreau began a radical experiment: he built a cabin in the woods and lived there, alone, examining the world around him. He spent his days walking the shores of Walden Pond, growing beans, observing plants and animals, and recording his reflections in his notebook. These reflections eventually became his seminal work Walden.

In this lovely picture book, Robert Burleigh and Wendell Minor imagine a special day spent with the celebrated writer and naturalist through the eyes of a child. Together Thoreau and the young boy watch small but significant wonders such as swimming fish, fighting ants, and clouds in the sky. It is a day full of splendor and appreciation of the outdoor world.

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In Mary’s Garden by Tina Kugler

While the rest of her classmates were making pastries in cooking classes, Mary Nohl was making art—anything she fancied out of anything she could find. Inspiration struck Mary even when she wasn’t looking for it. Mary used common objects to make uncommon art. And one day, her garden was a gallery.
Mary Nohl passed away in 2001 at the age of eighty-seven. Her famous garden gallery is located in the front yard of her Fox Point, Wisconsin, home to this day.

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The Iridescence of Birds by Patricia MacLachlan

If you were a boy named Henri Matisse who lived in a dreary town in northern France, what would your life be like? Would it be full of color and art? Full of lines and dancing figures?

Find out in this beautiful, unusual picture book about one of the world’s most famous and influential artists by acclaimed author and Newbery Medal-winning Patricia MacLachlan and innovative illustrator Hadley Hooper.

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The Librarian of Basra – A True Story from Iraq by Jeanette Winter

“In the Koran, the first thing God said to Muhammad was ‘Read.’”*
—Alia Muhammad Baker

Alia Muhammad Baker is a librarian in Basra, Iraq. For fourteen years, her library has been a meeting place for those who love books. Until now. Now war has come, and Alia fears that the library—along with the thirty thousand books within it—will be destroyed forever.

In a war-stricken country where civilians—especially women—have little power, this true story about a librarian’s struggle to save her community’s priceless collection of books reminds us all how, throughout the world, the love of literature and the respect for knowledge know no boundaries. Illustrated by Jeanette Winter in bright acrylic and ink.

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Life in the Ocean: The Story of Oceanographer Sylvia Earle by Claire A. Nivola

Sylvia Earle first lost her heart to the ocean as a young girl when she discovered the wonders of the Gulf of Mexico in her backyard. As an adult, she dives even deeper. Whether she’s designing submersibles, swimming with the whales, or taking deep-water walks, Sylvia Earle has dedicated her life to learning more about what she calls “the blue heart of the planet.” With stunningly detailed pictures of the wonders of the sea, Life in the Ocean tells the story of Sylvia’s growing passion and how her ocean exploration and advocacy have made her known around the world. This picture book biography also includes an informative author’s note that will motivate young environmentalists.

Life in the Ocean is one of The Washington Post’s Best Kids Books of 2012

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Magic Trash by J. H. Shapiro

Vacant lots. Abandoned houses. Trash—lots of trash. Heidelberg Street was in trouble! Tyree Guyton loved his childhood home—that’s where his grandpa Sam taught him to “paint the world.” So he wanted to wake people up… to make them see Detroit’s crumbling communities. Paintbrush in hand, Tyree cast his artistic spell, transforming everyday junk into magic trash. Soon local kids and families joined Tyree in rebuilding their neighborhood, discovering the healing power of art along the way. This picture book biography of Tyree Guyton, an urban environmental artist, shows how he transformed his decaying, crime-ridden neighborhood into the Heidelberg Project, an interactive sculpture park. The story spans from Tyree’s childhood in 1950s Detroit to his early efforts to heal his community through art in the 1980s. Tyree’s awards include Michigan Artist of the Year and International Artist. MAGIC TRASH offers strong themes of working together, the power of art, and the importance of inspiring community—especially kids—to affect action. The Heidelberg Project is internationally recognized for providing arts education to children and adults and for the ongoing development of several houses on Heidelberg Street. Not only does the Heidelberg Project prove that when a community works together it can rebuild itself, but it also addresses the issues of recycling, environmentalism, and community on a global level.

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Manfish – The Story of Jacques Cousteau by Jennifer Berne

Before Jacques Cousteau became an internationally known oceanographer and champion of the seas, he was a curious little boy. In this lovely biography, poetic text and gorgeous paintings combine to create a portrait of Jacques Cousteau that is as magical as it is inspiring.

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The Man Who Walked Between Two Towers by Mordicai Gerstein

In 1974, French aerialist Philippe Petit threw a tightrope between the two towers of the World Trade Center and spent an hour walking, dancing, and performing high-wire tricks a quarter mile in the sky. This picture book captures the poetry and magic of the event with a poetry of its own: lyrical words and lovely paintings that present the detail, daring, and—in two dramatic foldout spreads— the vertiginous drama of Petit’s feat.

The Man Who Walked Between the Towers is the winner of the 2004 Caldecott Medal, the winner of the 2004 Boston Globe – Horn Book Award for Picture Books, and the winner of the 2006 Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Children’s Video.

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Minette’s Feast – The Delicious Story of Julia Child and Her Cat by Susanna Reich

Minette’s Feast introduces the iconic American chef Julia Child to a new audience of young readers through the story of her spirited cat, Minette, whom Julia adopted when living in Paris. While Julia is in the kitchen learning to master delicious French dishes, the only feast Minette is truly interested in is that of fresh mouse! This lively story is complete with an author’s note, a bibliography, and actual quotations from Julia Child and comes just in time for the 100th anniversary of her birth.

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Monet Paints a Day by Julie Dannenberg

A glimpse into a day of Claude Monet’s life shows the painter racing against changing light, the incoming tide, and the elements as he paints an ocean scene in the plein-air style. Based on a true incident, the story is enhanced by brief facts about Impressionist painting, Monet’s life, and excerpts from the painter’s letters and notes.

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Mr. Ferris and His Wheel by Kathryn Gibbs Davis

Capturing an engineer’s creative vision and mind for detail, this fully illustrated picture book biography sheds light on how the American inventor George Ferris defied gravity and seemingly impossible odds to invent the world’s most iconic amusement park attraction, the Ferris wheel.
A fun, fact-filled text by Kathryn Gibbs Davis combines with Gilbert Ford’s dazzling full-color illustrations to transport readers to the 1893 World’s Fair, where George Ferris and his big, wonderful wheel lifted passengers to the skies for the first time.

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My Name is Gabito – The Life of Gabriel Garcia Marquez by Monica Brown

Can you imagine a shipwrecked sailor living on air and seaweed for eight days? Can you imagine a trail of yellow butterflies fluttering their wings to songs of love? Once, there was a little boy named Gabito who could. Gabriel Garcia Marquez is perhaps one of the most brilliant writers of our time. He is a tremendous figure, enomously talented, and unabashedly admired. This is his story, lovingly told, for children to enjoy. Using the imagery from his novels, Monica Brown traces the novelist’s life in this creative nonfiction picture book from his childhood in Colombia to today. This is an inspring story about an inspring life, full of imagination and beauty.

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On a Beam of Light by Jennifer Berne

A boy rides a bicycle down a dusty road. But in his mind, he envisions himself traveling at a speed beyond imagining, on a beam of light. This brilliant mind will one day offer up some of the most revolutionary ideas ever conceived. From a boy endlessly fascinated by the wonders around him, Albert Einstein ultimately grows into a man of genius recognized the world over for profoundly illuminating our understanding of the universe. Jennifer Berne and Vladimir Radunsky invite the reader to travel along with Einstein on a journey full of curiosity, laughter, and scientific discovery. Parents and children alike will appreciate this moving story of the powerful difference imagination can make in any life.

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One Plastic Bag: Isatou Ceesay and the Recycling Women of the Gambia by Miranda Paul

Plastic bags are cheap and easy to use. But what happens when a bag breaks or is no longer needed? In Njau, Gambia, people simply dropped the bags and went on their way. One plastic bag became two. Then ten. Then a hundred.

The bags accumulated in ugly heaps alongside roads. Water pooled in them, bringing mosquitoes and disease. Some bags were burned, leaving behind a terrible smell. Some were buried, but they strangled gardens. They killed livestock that tried to eat them. Something had to change.

Isatou Ceesay was that change. She found a way to recycle the bags and transform her community. This inspirational true story shows how one person’s actions really can make a difference in our world.

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Papa is a Poet – A Story about Robert Frost by Natalie S. Bober

When Robert Frost was a child, his family thought he would grow up to be a baseball player. Instead, he became a poet. His life on a farm in New Hampshire inspired him to write “poetry that talked,” and today he is famous for his vivid descriptions of the rural life he loved so much. There was a time, though, when Frost had to struggle to get his poetry published. Told from the point of view of Lesley, Robert Frost’s oldest daughter, this is the story of how a lover of language found his voice.

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Papa’s Mechanical Fish by Candace Flemming

Clink! Clankety-bang! Thump-whirr! That’s the sound of Papa at work. Although he is an inventor, he has never made anything that works perfectly, and that’s because he hasn’t yet found a truly fantastic idea. But when he takes his family fishing on Lake Michigan, his daughter Virena asks, “Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be a fish?”—and Papa is off to his workshop. With a lot of persistence and a little bit of help, Papa—who is based on the real-life inventor Lodner Phillips—creates a submarine that can take his family for a trip to the bottom of Lake Michigan.

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Passage to Freedom by Ken Mochizuki

Mochizuki and Lee’s (Baseball Saved Us) skillful volume pays tribute to Chiune Sugihara, a Japanese diplomat posted to Lithuania who in 1940 saved the lives of thousands of Polish Jews. Defying orders from his government, Sugihara handwrote visas for weeks to grant refugees passage through the Soviet Union to Japan. Told in the voice of his then-five-year-old son, the narrative centers upon the boy’s impressions: the creaking of the bedsprings as his sleepless father tossed and turned, the Jewish children huddled outside the consulate, his mother massaging her husband’s cramped arm. Lee’s precise, haunting art, created by scratching out images from beeswax applied to paper and then adding oil paint and colored pencil, has the look of sepia-toned photographs: it unites carefully balanced compositions and emotional intensity. Mochizuki and Lee’s inspired treatment brings out the import of Sugihara’s brave and compassionate decision. An afterword by Sugihara’s son updates the account: the family spent 18 months in a Soviet internment camp, and his father was stripped of his diplomatic post. A stirring story. Ages 4-up.

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Piano Starts Here – The Young Art Tatum by Robert A. Parker

Regardless of whether they’ve heard of jazz or Art Tatum, young readers will appreciate how Parker uses simple, lyrical storytelling and colorful, energetic ink-and-wash illustrations to show the world as young Art Tatum might have seen it. Tatum came from modest beginnings and was nearly blind, but his passion for the piano and his acute memory for any sound that he heard drove him to become a virtuoso who was revered by both classical and jazz pianists alike. Included in the back matter is a biography and bibliography.

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The Pilot and the Little Prince – The Life of Antoine de Saint-Exupery by Peter Sis

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry was born in France in 1900, when airplanes were just being invented. Antoine dreamed of flying and grew up to be a pilot—and that was when his adventures began. He found a job delivering mail by plane, which had never been done before. He and his fellow pilots traveled to faraway places and discovered new ways of getting from one place to the next. Antoine flew over mountains and deserts. He battled winds and storms. He tried to break aviation records, and sometimes he even crashed. From his plane, Antoine looked down on the earth and was inspired to write about his life and his pilot-hero friends in memoirs and in fiction. Peter Sís’s remarkable biography The Pilot and the Little Prince celebrates the author of The Little Prince, one of the most beloved books in the world. This title has Common Core connections.

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Pippo the Fool by Tracey E. Fern

The Cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence was a marvel of art, architecture, and engineering. But it lacked a finishing ornament, a crown—a dome! This book tells the story of architect Filippo Brunelleschi and the construction of his masterpiece.

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Rachel Carson and Her Book that Changed the World by Laurie Lawlor

In celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of Silent Spring, here is a biography of the pioneering environmentalist. “Once you are aware of the wonder and beauty of earth, you will want to learn about it,” wrote Rachel Carson. She wrote Silent Spring, the book that woke people up to the harmful impact humans were having on our planet. Silent Spring was first published in 1962. Winner of the award for Outstanding Science Trade Books for Students K-12 for 2013, a cooperative project of the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) and the Children’s Book Council.

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Rosa by Nikki Giovanni

She had not sought this moment but she was ready for it. When the policeman bent down to ask “Auntie, are you going to move?” all the strength of all the people through all those many years joined in her. She said, “No.”

An inspiring account of an event that shaped American history

Fifty years after her refusal to give up her seat on a Montgomery, Alabama, city bus, Mrs. Rosa Parks is still one of the most important figures in the American civil rights movement. This picture- book tribute to Mrs. Parks is a celebration of her courageous action and the events that followed.

Award-winning poet, writer, and activist Nikki Giovanni’s evocative text combined with Bryan Collier’s striking cut-paper images to retell the story of this historic event from a wholly unique and original perspective.

Rosa is a 2006 Caldecott Honor Book and the winner of the 2006 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award.

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Ruth Law Thrills a Nation by Don Brown

In 1916 a young woman named Ruth Law attempted to fly from Chicago to New York City in one day—something no one else had ever done. This is the story of that daring attempt. Beautifully detailed watercolors dramatize a dangerous journey made by the pilot President Woodrow Wilson called “great.”

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Separate is Never Equal by Duncan Tonatiuh

Almost 10 years before Brown vs. Board of Education, Sylvia Mendez and her parents helped end school segregation in California. An American citizen of Mexican and Puerto Rican heritage who spoke and wrote perfect English, Mendez was denied enrollment to a “Whites only” school. Her parents took action by organizing the Hispanic community and filing a lawsuit in federal district court. Their success eventually brought an end to the era of segregated education in California.

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Six Dots: A Story of Young Louis Braille by Jen Bryant

An inspiring picture-book biography of Louis Braille—a blind boy so determined to read that he invented his own alphabet.

Louis Braille was just five years old when he lost his sight. He was a clever boy, determined to live like everyone else, and what he wanted more than anything was to be able to read.

Even at the school for the blind in Paris, there were no books for him.

And so he invented his own alphabet—a whole new system for writing that could be read by touch. A system so ingenious that it is still used by the blind community today.

Award-winning writer Jen Bryant tells Braille’s inspiring story with a lively and accessible text, filled with the sounds, the smells, and the touch of Louis’s world. Boris Kulikov’s inspired paintings help readers to understand what Louis lost, and what he was determined to gain back through books.

An author’s note and additional resources at the end of the book complement the simple story and offer more information for parents and teachers.

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Starry Messenger by Peter Sis

“If they had seen what we see, they would have judged as we judge.” — Galileo Galilei

In every age, there are courageous people who break with tradition to explore new ideas and challenge accepted truths. Galileo Galilei was just such a man—a genius—and the first to turn the telescope to the skies to map the heavens. In doing so, he offered objective evidence that the earth was not the fixed centre of the universe but that it and all the other planets revolved around the sun. Galileo kept careful notes and made beautiful drawings of all that he observed. Through his telescope, he brought the starts down to earth for everyone to see.

By changing the way people saw the galaxy, Galileo was also changing the way they saw themselves and their place in the universe. This was very exciting, but to some it was deeply disturbing. Galileo has upset the harmonious view of heaven and earth that had been accepted since ancient times. He had turned the world upside down.

In this amazing new book, Peter Sís employs the artist’s lens to give us an extraordinary view of the life of Galileo Galilei. Sís tells his story in language as simple as a fairy tale, in pictures as rich and tightly woven as a tapestry, and in Galileo’s own words, written more than 350 years ago and still resonant with truth. This title has Common Core connections.

Starry Messenger is a 1997 Caldecott Honor Book.

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Swan by Laurel Snyder

The world is big.

Anna is small.

The snow is

everywhere

and all around.

But one night . . .

One night, her mother takes her to the ballet, and everything is changed. Anna finds a beauty inside herself that she cannot contain.

So begins the journey of a girl who will one day grow up to be the most famous prima ballerina of all time, inspiring legions of dancers after her: the brave, the generous, the transcendently gifted Anna Pavlova. Beautiful, inspirational, and triumphant, Anna Pavlova’s life is masterfully captured in this exquisite picture book. Plus, this is the fixed format version, which will look almost identical to the print version. Additionally, for devices that support audio, this ebook includes a read-along setting.

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The Wall by Peter Sis

“I was born at the beginning of it all, on the Red side—the Communist side—of the Iron Curtain.” Through annotated illustrations, journals, maps, and dreamscapes, Peter Sís shows what life was like for a child who loved to draw, proudly wore the red scarf of a Young Pioneer, stood guard at the giant statue of Stalin, and believed whatever he was told to believe. But adolescence brought questions. Cracks began to appear in the Iron Curtain, and news from the West slowly filtered into the country. Sís learned about beat poetry, rock ‘n’ roll, blue jeans, and Coca-Cola. He let his hair grow long, secretly read banned books, and joined a rock band. Then came the Prague Spring of 1968, and for a teenager who wanted to see the world and meet the Beatles, this was a magical time. It was short-lived, however, brought to a sudden and brutal end by the Soviet-led invasion. But this brief flowering had provided a glimpse of new possibilities—creativity could be discouraged but not easily killed.

By joining memory and history, Sís takes us on his extraordinary journey: from infant with paintbrush in hand to young man borne aloft by the wings of his art. This title has Common Core connections.

The Wall is a 2007 New York Times Book Review Best Illustrated Book of the Year, a 2008 Caldecott Honor Book, a 2008 Bank Street – Best Children’s Book of the Year, the winner of the 2008 Boston Globe-Horn Book Award for Nonfiction, and a nominee for the 2008 Eisner Award for Best Publication for Kids.

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Wangari Maathai: The Woman Who Planted Millions of Trees by Frank Prevot

Wangari Maathai received the Nobel Peace Prize in 2004 for her efforts to lead women in a nonviolent struggle to bring peace and democracy to Africa through its reforestation. Her organization planted over thirty million trees in thirty years. This beautiful picture book tells the story of an amazing woman and an inspiring idea.

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W is for Webster – Noah Webster and His American Dictionary by Tracey Fern

From an early age, Noah Webster was an odd fellow who liked to talk big and loved learning. He thought America needed its own national language and knew he was just the man to create it. He started with a speller, including everyday words like “scab,” “grub,” and “mop,” and moved on to create a small dictionary. He rode around on a horse, selling his books by hand. Then Noah decided to compile a complete and comprehensive dictionary of American English. He thought the book would take him five years to finish. It took twenty, but his dictionary today is the second-most printed book in the English language.

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Who Says Women Can’t be Doctors – The Story of Elizabeth Blackwell by Tanya Lee Stone

In the 1830s, when a brave and curious girl named Elizabeth Blackwell was growing up, women were supposed to be wives and mothers. Some women could be teachers or seamstresses, but career options were few. Certainly no women were doctors.

But Elizabeth refused to accept the common beliefs that women weren’t smart enough to be doctors, or that they were too weak for such hard work. And she would not take no for an answer. Although she faced much opposition, she worked hard and finally—when she graduated from medical school and went on to have a brilliant career—proved her detractors wrong. This inspiring story of the first female doctor shows how one strong-willed woman opened the doors for all the female doctors to come.

Who Says Women Can’t Be Doctors? by Tanya Lee Stone is an NPR Best Book of 2013

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20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne (Grade 7-12 Audiobook)

An American frigate, tracking down a ship-sinking monster, faces not a living creature but an incredible invention — a fantastic submarine commanded by the mysterious Captain Nemo. Suddenly a devastating explosion leaves just three survivors, who find themselves prisoners inside Nemo’s death ship on an underwater odyssey around the world from the pearl-laden waters of Ceylon to the icy dangers of the South Pole . . .as Captain Nemo, one of the greatest villians ever created, takes his revenge on all society.

More than a marvelously thrilling drama, this classic novel, written in 1870, foretells with uncanny accuracy the inventions and advanced technology of the twentieth century and has become a literary stepping-stone for generations of science fiction writers.

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The Deadly Seas (Worst Case Scenarios) by David Borgenicht (Grade 3-7)

Join one of the youngest crews ever to sail around the world in this fourth installment of the Worst-Case Scenario Ultimate Adventure Novel series! Faced with fearsome dangers and difficult decisions, your choices will determine your fate on the deadly seas. Will you survive tropical storms, high winds, navigation crises, and sharks? Or will you be forced to return home early? Only the reader can decide how to survive. There are 24 endings to this adventure, but just ONE will lead to the ultimate success!

With eye-catching comic book style illustrations and real-life facts about survival on the high seas, young readers can choose how to survive and jump to the next section in this interactive ebook.

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Dory Story by Jerry Pallotta (Grade K-3)

Be prepared for a few surprises when Danny ventures out into the bay in his dory.

Although taking the dory out solo is strictly forbidden, Danny cannot resist the calm waters of the bay. And that’s where the adventure begins. He thinks rowing into a school of bluefish is trouble enough, but wait until the whales enter the picture. Danny encounters one sea creature after another and learns about the ocean food chain in the process. Just when you think you know what’s going to happen next, the story takes an unexpected twist.

With brilliant and vibrant illustrations, readers will feel the excitement of being out on the water surrounded by ocean creatures. The life and the life cycle of the ocean will fascinate young readers.

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The Great Bear Sea by Ian McAllister (Grade 8-12)

Ian McAllister and Nicholas Read take readers on an expedition into the wondrous and mysterious underwater world of the Great Bear Sea. This amazing part of the northeast Pacific Ocean is home to some of the planet’s mightiest and most beloved residents: whales, sea lions, dolphins, orcas, sea otters and wild salmon. Filled with spectacular images of this largely unknown part of the world, the book also explores the uncertain future of the Great Bear Sea in this age of climate change, overfishing, pipelines and oil tankers. Can a rainforest full of rare spirit bears, fishing wolves and great grizzlies survive without a Great Bear Sea to feed and nourish it?

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I Must Go Down to the Beach Again by Karen Jo Shapiro (Grade 4-7)

In this delightful collection of poetic parodies, Karen Jo Shapiro takes 23 classic poems spanning nearly five centuries and gives them a kid-sized twist.

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Life of Pi by Yann Martel (Grade 7-12)

Life of Pi is a masterful and utterly original novel that is at once the story of a young castaway who faces immeasurable hardships on the high seas, and a meditation on religion, faith, art and life that is as witty as it is profound. Using the threads of all of our best stories, Yann Martel has woven a glorious spiritual adventure that makes us question what it means to be alive, and to believe.

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Nim’s Island by Wendy Orr (Grade 4-8)

A girl. An iguana. An island. And e-mail. Meet Nim–a modern-day Robinson Crusoe! She can chop down bananas with a machete, climb tall palm trees, and start a fire with a piece of glass. So she’s not afraid when her scientist dad sails off to study plankton for three days, leaving her alone on their island. Besides, it’s not as if no one’s looking after her–she’s got a sea lion to mother her and an iguana for comic relief. She also has an interesting new e-mail pal. But when her father’s cell-phone calls stop coming and disaster seems near, Nim has to be stronger and braver than she’s ever been before. And she’ll need all her friends to help her.

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Ocean Soup by Stephen R. Swinburne (Grade K-3)

Playful poems introduce readers to ten salty tide-pool creatures—from a self-satisfied anemone that brags about its home to barnacles that perform a rap about their feeding technique.

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Salt to the Sea by Ruta Sepetys 9-12

New York Times Bestseller! “Masterly crafted”—The Wall Street Journal

World War II is drawing to a close in East Prussia and thousands of refugees are on a desperate trek toward freedom, many with something to hide. Among them are Joana, Emilia, and Florian, whose paths converge en route to the ship that promises salvation, the Wilhelm Gustloff. Forced by circumstance to unite, the three find their strength, courage, and trust in each other tested with each step closer to safety.

Just when it seems freedom is within their grasp, tragedy strikes. Not country, nor culture, nor status matter as all ten thousand people—adults and children alike—aboard must fight for the same thing: survival.

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Sea Change by Diane Tullson (Grade 9-12 Text difficulty 2-3)

Lucas and his father are not close. In fact they hardly see each other, which is just fine with Lucas. When he travels to the remote fishing lodge his father manages, Lucas is left once again, this time with a lodge worker, a girl named Sumi. She makes it pretty clear that Lucas is on his own. But she does take him fishing and seems to be warming up to him. Then, in a horrible sequence of misjudgments, Sumi is shot in the foot. With no radio and no phone, Lucas and Sumi are truly alone. Fog rolls over the islands and it’s up to Lucas to get Sumi to medical help, a day’s journey by boat up the inlet.

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This is the Sea that Feeds Us by Robert F. Baldwin (Grade K-3)

From the delightful opening verse of this poetic nonfiction book, the reader learns the important concept that plankton is the first link in the ocean food chain. The rhyming text continues and covers each link—the shrimp who eats the plankton, the sea bass who eats the shrimp and the humans who catch the sea bass for dinner. This is a wonderful resource for studies on ocean plankton, habitats, and food chains.

Reviews by Overdrive

ABC of Canada

ABC of Canada by Per-Henrik Gurth

From Arctic to Zamboni, kids can follow the alphabet on a colorful tour across Canada. On their journey, they’ll visit Canadian landmarks, including Jasper National Park and Peggy’s Cove. They’ll also meet friendly characters enjoying Canadian pastimes, such as riding in the Calgary Stampede, playing hockey and watching the Northern Lights. Vivid illustrations and simple language guarantee that even the youngest traveler will enjoy this trip!

Canada 123

Canada 123 by Kim Bellefontaine

See and count the sights on a colorful tour of Canada from coast to coast. Bold landscapes and an adorable cast of characters are sure to have kids making the trip from one to ten and back again!

Oh Canada

Oh Canada by Per-Henrik Gurth

This title in the Canada Concept Books series by Per-Henrik Gurth is bursting with striking, kid-friendly art. It’s a cross-Canada tour showcasing the distinct identities of each province and territory. There are also two more titles in this series Canada in Colours and Canada, All Year.

F is for French

F is for French by Elaine Arsenault

Founded in 1608, what city is one of the oldest in North America? Where and when was Canada’s first road built? What world-famous circus was the inspiration of Baie-Saint-Paul street performers? Discover the answers to these questions, along with other facts, in F is for French: A Quebec Alphabet. Readers young and old can romp the sandy beaches of Les Iles de la Madeleine, visit Montreal’s Space for Life (Canada’s largest natural science museum complex), brave the arctic cold in the Nunavik region, or sit back and enjoy the music at one of the many performances taking place at the Montreal International Jazz Festival.

Canada

Canada by Christine Fournier

Provides an overview of the history, geography, people, economy, government, and other aspects of life in Canada.

Canada, The Land

Canada, The Land by Bobbie Kalman

The second-largest country on Earth, Canada possesses a tremendous variety of natural wonders. This new second revision to Canada the Land takes students on a fascinating tour of the country’s rugged coasts, frozen northern regions, vast prairies, and majestic mountain ranges. Learn about Canada’s agricultural and other national resources, and how they relate to the rest of the world. Updated information includes facts and statistics, as well as a revision of which animals currently appear on extinct and endangered lists.

Spotlight on Canada

Spotlight on Canada by Bobbie Kalman

Spotlight on Canada introduces children to Canada’s multicultural people, its varied landscapes and climates, its exciting cities, and its joyful celebrations. A huge country with only one neighbor, the United States, Canada is divided into provinces and territories. French and English are its two official languages, and its rich history goes back to its French and English roots. This colorful book celebrates the diversity of this great country!

Canada Eh?

Canadian Eh! by Doug Sylvester

Canada — the land of boundless natural beauty and untapped resources. In our unit, students will adventure into Canada, exploring the geographical, geopolitical and industrial make-up of the nation. Our unit starts off with a knowledge-based section, where students are expected to know the names and locations of the provinces, territories and capital cities. Student notes and a map activity are used in correlation with this section. Students then study the main landforms of Canada, emphasizing the industries important to each area. This Canada lesson provides a teacher and student section with a variety of reading passages, activities, crossword, word search, colouring book and answer key to create a well-rounded lesson plan.

Reviews by Overdrive

After Peaches

After Peaches by Michelle Mulder

Ten-year-old Rosario Ramirez and her family are political refugees from Mexico, trying to make a new life in Canada. After being teased at school, Rosario vows not to speak English again until she can speak with an accent that’s one hundred percent Canadian. Since she and her parents plan to spend the whole summer working on BC fruit farms, she will be surrounded by Spanish speakers again. But when her family’s closest friend Jose gets terribly sick, Rosario’s plans start to unravel. Neither Jose nor Rosario’s parents speak English well enough to get him the help he needs. Like it or not, Rosario must face her fears about letting her voice be heard.

Note: There is a teacher’s guide to After Peaches here.

Back to Batoche

Back to Batoche by Cheryl Chad

“A century is only a spoke in the wheel of everlasting time.” -Louis Riel.

In 1885, Batoche is a dangerous place to be! The discovery of a magic pocket watch at the Batoche National Historical Site hurls Max, Kaeleigh and Liam back in time to the eve of the greatest battle fought in the North West: the Battle of Batoche!

The North West Field Force sent by Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald is about to attack the Métis of the small village. Soldiers march and the bell of Batoche rings out in warning as the three time-travelling siblings, together with their new friend Isidore, find a way to help Gabriel Dumont and Louis Riel lead their people during the North West Resistance. It’s an adventure like nothing they could have imagined, full of danger, intrigue and mystery!

Belle's Journey

Belle’s Journey by Marilynn Reynolds

Set on the prairies during the twenties, Belle’s Journey is a moving story of steadfast devotion and a heroic fight for survival.

The Big Snapper

The Big Snapper by Katherine Holubitsky

Ten-year-old Eddie lives with his mom and grandparents in a small cabin on the Queen Charlotte Islands. A year earlier, Eddie’s dad took the ferry to the mainland and never returned. Eddie loves going fishing with Granddad and listening to his tall tales about the big snapper. Eddie believes if they catch such a fish, it might change his family’s fortune. Mom decides to turn their cabin into a bed and breakfast. Some of the guests appreciate island life, but many do not. When Granddad falls ill and must go away for treatment, Eddie worries that he too may not come back. Already hurt and confused by his father’s disappearance, upset by the attitudes of the tourists, and now missing his beloved grandfather, Eddie goes fishing alone in Granddad’s skiff. Soon he is struggling with more than the need to stay afloat.

Note: You can find a Teacher’s Guide for Big Snapper here.

Camp X

Camp X by Eric Walters

It’s 1943, and nearly-12-year-old George and his older brother Jack are spending a restless wartime summer in Whitby, Ontario, where their mom is working at a munitions plant while their dad is off fighting the Germans. One afternoon, the boys stumble across Canada’s top-secret spy camp-and so begins an exciting and terrifying adventure as George and Jack get caught up in the covert activities of Camp X.

Fascinated by Camp X and its secrets, the boys begin to suspect local townspeople of being spies. Is the police chief keeping tabs on people for enemy purposes? Is Jack’s boss at the newspaper really amassing information for sinister reasons?

Unable to resist the camp’s allure, the boys keep going back to find out more details of what’s going on-they even meet William Stephenson, the Man Called Intrepid himself. They also attract the attention of a very sinister character, someone who is determined to use George and Jack’s knowledge against the Allies, no matter the consequences . . . or the casualties.

Catching Spring

Catching Spring by Sylvia Olsen

The year is 1957, and Bobby lives on the Tsartlip First Nation reserve on Vancouver Island where his family has lived for generations and generations. He loves his weekend job at the nearby marina. He loves to play marbles with his friends. And he loves being able to give half his weekly earnings to his mother to eke out the grocery money, but he longs to enter the up-coming fishing derby. With the help of his uncle and Dan from the marina his wish just might come true.

Note: You can find a Teacher’s Guide to Catching Spring here.

Chaos in Halifax

Chaos in Halifax by Cathy Beaveridge

Twelve-year-old Jolene is determined to find independence from her brother, Michael, during a family trip to research the Halifax explosion of 1917 for her father’s Museum of Disasters. When her grandfather finds a time crease into the past, Jolene discovers a new friend and the importance of family and loyalty in a world torn apart by World War I. Once Michael joins them, however, the past suddenly becomes much more complicated. He inadvertently threatens Jolene’s friendship with a grieving family, and his careless comments spark speculation that they are spies. Together, the twins try to reconcile the honour and horrors of the Great War as they struggle with the knowledge that Halifax will soon be devastated by the collision in the harbour between the Mont Blanc, laden with explosives, and the Imo. When Michael attempts to change history, the twins are led to the brink of destruction.

Discovering Emily by Jacqueline Pearce and Emily’s Dream by Jacqueline Pearce

Young Emily Carr has no interest in learning to be a lady. She loves animals and the outdoors, and she is beginning to discover that what she loves most of all is drawing and painting. Will she find a way to develop her talent in the straitlaced world of nineteenth-century Victoria, British Columbia? Discovering Emily is the first of two books in a series.

Note: You can find novel studies for these two books on Jacqueline Pearce’s website.

Ellie’s New Home by Becky Citra

Ellie and her little brother Max find themselves moving from their grandmother’s comfortable home in England to Upper Canada. Their mother is dead, Father wants to start over again, and in 1835 there are many opportunities for settlers in British North America. Despite the strangeness of this vast new world, Ellie is sure things will turn out all right, as long as the family stays together. But once they are in Upper Canada, Father leaves Ellie and Max with strangers on an isolated homestead, while he goes on ahead to find land and build a cabin. Although the mother and father are kind to her, Ellie makes an enemy of their daughter Mary, who is insulted by the newcomer’s distant manners, fine clothes and talk of her London home. Ellie’s loneliness and discomfort, however, gradually turns into a growing fear. Where is Father? Why hasn’t he come back to them? A gripping story for young readers that explored the world of early settlers.

The Glory Wind by Valerie Sherrard

A young boy must come to terms with the moral prejudices of his small town in rural 1950s Ontario when he befriends the daughter of a young widow who moves in next door. Gracie is unlike anyone Luke has ever met – fun, charming, imaginative and full of life. But when the townsfolk discover that her mother’s past is less than completely honourable, they set out to isolate both mother and daughter. This striking new novel from Valerie Sherrard explores themes of friendship, loyalty, hypocrisy, and forgiveness.

The Lamp, the Ice and a Boat called Fish

The Lamp, the Ice and the Boat Called Fish by Jacqueline Briggs Martin

The Lamp, the Ice, and the Boat Called Fish tells the dramatic story of the Canadian Arctic expedition that set off in 1913 to explore the high north.

Lucky's Mountain

Lucky’s Mountain by Dianne Haycock

The year is 1935 and Maggie Sullivan’s world has fallen apart. Maggie has grown up in a close-knit mining community perched atop a mountain in British Columbia. But now her father has been killed in a mine explosion and she is being forced to leave the only home she has ever known. To make matters worse, she must also leave behind her best friend Lucky, the three-legged dog that was a special gift from Pa.

Note: Teacher’s Guide for Lucky’s Mountain here.

The Lynching of Louie Sam

The Lynching of Louie Sam by Elizabeth Stewart

Between 1882 and 1968 there were 4,742 lynchings in the United States. In Canada during the same period there was one—the hanging of American Indian Louie Sam.

The year is 1884, and 15-year-old George Gillies lives in the Washington Territory, near the border with British Columbia. In this newly settled land, white immigrants have an uneasy relationship with the Native Indians. When George and his siblings discover the murdered body of a local white man, suspicion immediately falls on a young Indian named Louie Sam. George and his best friend, Pete, follow a lynch mob north into Canada, where the terrified boy is seized and hung.

But even before the deed is done, George begins to have doubts. Louie Sam was a boy, only 14—could he really be a vicious murderer? Were the mob leaders motivated by justice, or were they hiding their own guilt? As George uncovers the truth—implicating Pete’s father and other prominent locals—tensions in the town rise, and he must face his own part in the tragedy. But standing up for justice has devastating consequences for George and his family.

Inspired by the true story of the lynching, recently acknowledged as a historical injustice by Washington State, this powerful novel offers a stark depiction of historical racism and the harshness of settler life. The story will provoke readers to reflect on the dangers of mob mentality and the importance of speaking up for what’s right.

Meyer's Creek

Meyer’s Creek by Connie Brummel Crook

A compelling story of the true experiences of a United Empire Loyalist family during a critical period of Canadian history. Mary Meyers is typical of any nineteen-year-old. She longs for adventure—and for freedom to live her own life.But in the year 1786, and the realities that face newly settled United Empire Loyalist families like Mary’s are often harsh. In this continuation of the Meyers family saga that began with the author’s first novel, Flight, Mary must come to terms with danger, the survival of her family, and love.”

Note: Study Guide (Ideas and Activities) for Meyers Creek is available here.

The Old Brown Suitcase

The Old Brown Suitcase by Lillian Boraks Nemetz

The Old Brown Suitcase, an award winning book that has sold extraordinarily well both nationally and internationally, now appears in a new edition by Ronsdale Press. The novel narrates the absorbing story of a young girl who survived the Holocaust against all odds.

At age fourteen, Slava comes to Canada with her parents and sister and a suitcase filled with memories of a lost childhood, memories that now haunt her new life. She cannot forget the hunger, stench and disease in the Warsaw Ghetto, nor the fear and humiliation of being incarcerated behind a high brick wall. She cannot forget her extraordinary escape from the Ghetto when she walked alone through the gate while the guards were looking the other way. Nor can she forget being swallowed up in a strange and unknown place to survive under a hidden identity.

The story juxtaposes heart-wrenching scenes from a child’s life in war-torn Poland with the life of a teenager trying to adjust to a new country in time of peace. In Canada, it is not easy for Slava to build a bridge between two cultures; nor is it easy to live with the turmoil of her immediate past. At the same time she must face the new challenges involved in being an immigrant, a Jew and a teenage girl. This new edition appends notes on the Warsaw ghetto and a bibliography for future reading.

The Phantoms Gold

The Phantom’s Gold by Eric Murphy

A year after a tragic accident, thirteen-year-old William McCoy runs away to Lunenberg, Nova Scotia to be with his late father’s family. He finds more than just memories: he also finds a high-stakes schooner race, clues to the location of a legendary stash of gold … and the ghost of his ancestor, the famous rum-runner Bill “The Real” McCoy!

Rescue at Fort Edmonton

Rescue at Fort Edmonton by Rita Feutl

Janey doesn’t want to spend the summer away from her friends in Toronto – and certainly not in Edmonton with the grandmother she hardly knows. But her parents will be away – her mother in Turkey designing housing for earthquake victims, her dad on business trips.Her first surprise is her feisty grandma, who meets her at the airport in her vintage Cadillac, Marilyn. The second comes when she visits the Fort Edmonton historic park and time travels to 1907. The third is learning the real reason she’s in Edmonton. Her grandma is going through cancer treatment and needs someone to be with her.Janey makes four trips, each to a different period of Fort Edmonton’s history. What draws her into the past? Only on the last trip does she discover the meaning of her adventures – and their crucial connection to her own family.Rita Feutl’s first novel features a deftly handled plot and a wealth of fascinating characters from prairie history.

Note: Novel Study Guide for Rescue at Fort Edmonton is available here.

The Reunion

The Reunion by Jacqueline Pearce

Shannon is excited about spending a week at her friend Rina’s house, but she’s a little nervous too. Rina seems to be able to do everything better than she can and her home is chaotic compared to Shannon’s own. When things fall apart, Rina’s grandmother is there to tell them a story from her past, early in the Second World War. The story is about a rift between her and her childhood friend, Mitsu, a rift that could never be healed because Mitsu and her family were taken away from the small town of Paldi and interned with other Japanese Canadians. Rina’s grandmother, Jas, never saw Mitsu again. That is, not until Shannon and Rina find a handful of forgotten beads in the bottom of a cardboard box.

Note: Teacher’s Guide for The Reunion here.

Strawberry Moon

Strawberry Moon by Becky Citra

The year is 1838 and Ellie’s grandmother has arrived all the way from England. Ellie is horrified to discover that the forbidding old woman intends to take her back to Britain to be raised properly. Ellie is determined that she will not go, but what can a nine-year-old girl do in the face of an adult with her mind made up?

Note: Teacher Guide for Strawberry Moon is available here.

Willa's New World

Willa’s New World by Barbara Demers

Willa is a thirteen-year-old orphan shipped to the new world in 1795. Resourceful and strong-willed, she survives many hardships before travelling on foot from Hudson’s Bay to Fort Edmonton with native companions who show her a genuinely “new” world.Life doesn’t look promising for Willa when her family is wiped out by the London plague. Her uncaring uncle ships her to York Factory on Hudson’s Bay, scarcely expecting her to survive the trip. But she’s stronger than he knows. Not only does she make it to the new world, but she also survives unscrupulous thieves by going to work for Master George, the fort commander, and by befriending Amelia, the aboriginal cook.Through her successful work and the support of Amelia, Willa begins to be something she has never dreamed of – a strong and independent person. After Willa refuses Master George’s surprise offer of marriage, she decides she must leave again. As Amelia’s relatives lead her across the northern wilderness to Fort Edmonton, they show her a land of great beauty and teach Willa how to live in accord with this natural world.

Winds of L'Acadie

Winds of L’Acadie by Lois Donovan

When sixteen-year-old Sarah from Toronto learns that she is to spend the summer with her grandparents in Nova Scotia, she is convinced that it will be the most tedious summer ever. She gets off to a rough start when she meets Luke, the nephew of her grandmother’s friend, and one unfortunate event leads to another. Just when she thinks her summer cannot get much worse, she finds herself transported to Acadia in 1755.

Here she meets Anne and learns much about the Acadian culture and history and the Acadians’ relations with the Mi’kmac people. She also experiences the warmth she has always wanted of a closely knit family. When Sarah realizes that the peace-loving Acadians are about to be torn from their homes and banished to distant shores, she is desperate to find a way to help them. Forced to abandon her pampered, stylish lifestyle, Sarah uncovers a strength and determination she did not know she possessed.

Although Sarah has to come to terms with the fact that “you can’t change history,” she is willing to risk her life to do everything in her power to help her Acadian family, and finds a surprising ally in Luke. Winds of L’Acadie, a historical novel for readers ten and up, reveals a painful part of Canadian history through the relationship of two young women from different centuries.

Note: Teacher Guide for Winds of L’Acadie is available here.

Reviews by Overdrive

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Citizen Miles by Phillip Walton (Grades K-3)

When it falls upon the gang to take over volunteer duties for their friend Miles, they don’t understand why they should volunteer in the first place. As they work in the community they see how much fun it can be and want to continue volunteering after Miles returns. They realize Miles is a great example of what it means to be a good citizen.

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Crafts for Kids Who are Learning About Community Workers by Kathy Ross (Grades K-3)

A community is a lot of people working together to help each other. In school you are learning about all of the things that community workers do to help you. The projects in this book are all about these workers. They include an Apple for the Teacher Pencil Topper, a Mail Carrier Dispenser for Stamps, a Sock-It Away Bank, a Jackhammer Puppet, a Squirting Hose Puppet, and even a pair of play Handcuffs! So get out your scissors and paste and a few household recyclables, and celebrate your community!

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Do Something for Others: The Kids Book of Citizenship by Anders Hanson (Grades K-3)

Learn how to support your community! Do Something for Others: the Kids’ Book of Citizenship will teach kids to follow the rules, be respectful and tolerant, take care of the environment and help others. This book will show kids how to use compassion, respect, responsibility, and honesty with those around them. Simple text and charming pictures will keep kids interested while they learn. It’s never too early to help kids stand up for what is right.

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Fire Station by Aaron Carr (Grades K-3)

Young readers will learn about the people and places that make up a community in the allnew My Neighborhood series. Each book features easytored text based on sight words, paired with vivid photos to stimulate and engage even the most reluctant readers.

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Helpers in my Community by Bobbie Kalman (Grades K-3)

This book introduces children to the important people who make our communities cleaner, safer, and better. Action shots feature people working in construction, at schools, in hospitals, fighting fires, doing police work, and volunteering. An activity asks children what kinds of things they could do to volunteer in their own communities.

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Important Jobs by Teresa Domnauer (Grades K-3)

Every day, workers are busy helping others. IMPORTANT! Jobs explores the roles of police officers, scientists, construction workers and other community members. The Spectrum(R) Readers are the perfect Common Core aligned tool to support the development of nonfiction reading skills. Each leveled reader features high-interest informational content, exciting full-color photo images, and Common Core aligned comprehension practice focused on the development of critical thinking skills. Leveled to the respected Fountas and Pinnell and Lexile systems, these 32-page books are perfect for young readers who are ready to explore leisure reading on their own. This multilevel series is the perfect addition to any school or home library.

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Lemonade for Sale by Bettina Ling

Kate wants to buy her dad a birthday present. She sets up a lemonade stand to earn the money, and her friends all help. But things keep going wrong. Will she ever have enough money to buy a present for her dad?

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Let’s Meet a Police Officer by Gina Bellisario (Grades K-3)

Do you want to learn more about police cars? Police dogs? Other tools the police use? Then it’s your lucky day! Officer Gabby is a police officer. She knows how to keep people safe. She shows a group of kids how she does her job. Three cheers for police officers!

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Our Community by Evan Moor (Grades K-3)

Delightful pocket projects about the community! Four pocket projects provide students with the opportunity to learn about people, places, and safety in the community. Pocket 1: Community Helpers Comparing Two Important Jobs—Firefighter/Police Officer Pocket 2: The ABCs of Occupations Interview a Community Worker What Job Should I Do? Pocket 3: Places in Our Community A Fold-Out Community Pocket 4: My Safety Book Do You Know Safety Signs?

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Work and More Work by Linda Little (Grades K-3)

Tom lives in the countryside in the mid 1800s and he’s curious — what is it like in the town, the city and the world beyond? It’s all “work and more work,” everyone tells him. Determined to find out for himself, Tom sets off with a bit of bread and cheese in a bundle…

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Creating a Digital Portfolio by Suzy Rabbat

Learn how to create an interesting online portfolio of your work.

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Entrepreneurship Create your Own Business by Alex Kahan (Grades 4-8)

From the early days of traders and trappers to today’s global online marketplace, business is the glue that holds our world together. In Entrepreneurship: Create Your Own Business, children learn what it takes to transform a great idea into their own new business. Through plenty of hands-on activities, art and history meet economics and math while young readers gain a solid understanding of how a business works.
Kids use familiar resources to develop a business idea of their own, create a presentation for potential investors, and utilize basic cost and price analysis worksheets. The skills they learn by writing a business plan, creating a prototype of an item to sell, designing packaging, and finding ways to advertise their products translate into language, math, and problem-solving skills that are relevant across all subjects. Cartoon illustrations, fun facts, and interviews with successful entrepreneurs make Entrepreneurship entertaining and informative. Supplemental materials include a glossary, list of resources, and an index.

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Get Organized without Losing it by Janet S. Fox

Kids today have a lot to keep track of—and keep organized. Schoolwork, friends, activities, chores…rooms, backpacks, lockers, desks…and what about fun? Here’s friendly, practical, humorous help for kids who want to manage their tasks, their time, and their stuff—without going overboard or being totally obsessed. Tips, techniques, strategies, and examples empower kids to conquer clutter, prioritize tasks, handle homework, prepare for tests, plan projects, stop procrastinating, and start enjoying the benefits of being organized: less stress and more success. Lists and steps make it doable; jokes and cartoons make it enjoyable. Recommended for any kid who’s frustrated, overwhelmed, and sick of hearing “Clean your room!” “Where’s your homework?” and “You’re going to be late AGAIN!”

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Life Skills by Mark Twain Media (Grades 5+)

Guide students in grades 5 and up toward a healthy lifestyle, both physically and financially, using Life Skills: Preparing Students for the Future. This 128-page book covers topics such as work ethic, nutrition, exercise, sexually transmitted diseases, drugs, and preparing financially for the future. Graphic organizers, self inventories, puzzles, real-life situations, and cloze activities provide creative opportunities for students to assess their own lifestyles and make good choices for the future.

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Real Kids, Real Stories, Real Change by Garth Sunden

Inspire kids and teens to personal, community, and social action with this book of thirty true stories of young people overcoming adversity to achieve great things and make a difference around the world. Compelling, funny, inspiring, and poignant, the book features kids and teens who used their heads, their hearts, their character, their courage, and sometimes their stubbornness to help others and do amazing things. Inside you’ll find examples of youth volunteering, kids making a difference, and young people initiating community and social action to change their world. What makes these kids so special? Eleven-year-old Tilly saved the lives of 100 people in Thailand because she knew the warning signs of a tsunami. Ten-year-old Jean-Dominic won a battle against pesticides—and the cancer they caused in his body. Fifteen-year-old Malika fought against segregation in her Alabama town. Six-year-old Ryan raised over one million dollars to drill water wells in Africa. And thirteen-year-old Bethany, a competitive surfer, lost her left arm (and almost her life) to a shark, but got back on her surfboard.

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See you Later, Procrastinator! by Pamela Espeland

Kids today are notorious for putting things off—it’s easy for homework and chores to take a backseat to playing video games, hanging out with friends, watching television, or surfing online. Full-color cartoons and kid-friendly text teach kids how to get motivated, stay motivated, and get things done. Kids learn 12 reasons why people procrastinate and 12 Procrastination Busters that can help; 20 ways to kiss procrastination good-bye; tips for avoiding setbacks like the dreaded Domino Effect; and Mighty Motivators and Fun Rewards to keep them on track. See You Later, Procrastinator! gives kids lots of ways to kick the procrastination habit and feel more in charge of their lives.

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Starting your Own Business by Cecilia Minden (Grades 4-8)

Do you have a great idea? Do you think customers would pay to buy your product or service? Read this book to learn more about starting your own business and why good math skills are necessary if you want to make your business a success.

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The Teen’s Ultimate Guide to Making Money When You Can’t Get a Job by Julie Fryer Grade 6+

Whether it was in a department store, fast-food chain, or kiosk in the mall, everyone remembers his or her first job—even more so, you probably remember that first paycheck. But with the current job crisis, it has become harder and harder to enjoy the fruits of your labor. Now more than ever, it has become necessary to think outside the box to reel in the dough.

Making money is about making smart decisions. The Teen’s Ultimate Guide to Making Money When You Can’t Get a Job will put you on the right track to start earning your spending money, even if you cannot land a traditional first job. You will learn how to start exploring other options, such as pet sitting, babysitting, and tutoring. You will also grasp just how to leverage the Internet to help you make money by taking paid surveys, blogging, or even teaching your parents and their friends how to use social networks. Most importantly, you will discover how to take your hobbies and turn them into your personalized income generator.

This book not only covers how to make that money, but it also teaches you how to save it and how to make it grow, presented specifically with teenagers in mind. You will learn which credit cards are the best when you are first starting out. You will learn how to set (and stick to) a budget to help save for something you really want, whether it is for a car or your college education.

This book contains inspiring stories from young adults just like you who have found self-employment a boon in a tough economy and are flourishing despite the tough times. If you have been hitting the pavement but are coming up short in the job department, all is not lost. With The Teen’s Ultimate Guide to Making Money When You Can’t Get a Job in your back pocket, you can start making money on your own without having to depend on your parents’ finances.

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Apple Tree Christmas by Trinka Hakes Noble

Originally published over twenty years ago, and out of print since 1998, Sleeping Bear Press is proud to bring this beloved Christmas tale to a whole new audience. Moving and nostalgic, and brought to life by glowing watercolor paintings, it reveals the joy of a very special present and the love that a father and daughter share.

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Candy Canes in Bethlehem by Miriam Van Scott

Unwrap the gifts of tradition and celebration from cultures around the globe in this illustrated Christmas storybook as Daniel discovers the true meaning behind Christmas’ piñatas, pickles, kangaroos, gingerbread houses, stockings, and candy canes—the birth of Jesus Christ! Brightly-colored, brushstroke illustrations adorn this festive, hardcover book. A great read aloud for children ages 6-8 to help them learn about the religious meanings of secular symbols in the Christmas season—at home or in the classroom.

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Christmas Around the World by Lesley Sims

Christmas customs, festive food, present-giving, songs and traditional stories from around the world with easy-reading text for children who have just started reading alone. Part of the Usborne Reading Programme developed with reading experts at the University of Roehampton.

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Christmas at Wapos Bay by Jordan Wheeler

At Christmas time in Northern Saskatchewan, three Cree kids – Talon, Raven and T-Bear – visit their Moshum’s (grandfather’s) cabin to learn about traditional ways and have a life-changing adventure.Talon, Raven, and T-Bear, who have never lived in the bush, visit their Moshum’s cabin to prepare for Christmas and to learn traditional ways. But food is scarce this year, and Moshum is afraid Christmas may have to be cancelled.The kids decide to help by going hunting, but they don’t understand how unprepared they are or what danger they’re in. They get lost, forcing Moshum to come after them. But when they find him collapsed in the bush, it is the children who have to bring Moshum safely home.The experience helps them to grow in skill and understanding and to become more mature. Their parents come and Christmas isn’t cancelled, in fact it’s a wonderful, warm celebration, filled with music and feasting. T-Bear, Talon, and Raven learn that they can benefit from two kinds of knowledge – traditional learning through their elders and the things they learn in school.

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The Christmas Tree Ship by Carol Crane

On November 21, 1912, the schooner Rouse Simmons set sail from a small northern Michigan town across Lake Michigan. Affectionately dubbed the “Christmas Tree Ship,” this was an annual trek for the Rouse Simmons. With its cargo of Christmas trees, the ship was bound for Chicago. There Captain Herman Scheunemann would sell the trees for 50 cents or $1.00 and even gave many away to needy families. But the schooner never makes its destination. The Rouse Simmons, with all hands and cargo, disappears into the cold waters. The ship’s wreckage is not found until 1971. Drawing from stories told by her grandfather, author Carol Crane weaves a fictional tale based on the true events of the doomed schooner. And she explains how the captain’s widow went on to continue his tradition of delivering holiday trees to Chicago.

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The Donkey in the Living Room by Sarah Cunningham

The Christmas story of the Nativity is told in the 9 days leading up to Christmas. A perfect companion for a family to use with any nativity scene.

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Good Night Christmas by Cooper Kelly

Savor the magic of the season with this celebration of a traditional family Christmas. Children of all ages will enjoy tree trimming, caroling, baking Christmas cookies, decorating the house, making snow angels, reading Christmas stories, leaving milk and cookies for Santa, hanging stockings, opening presents on Christmas morning, and more.

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Home for Christmas by Jan Brett

A wild little troll runs away from home because he doesn’t want to do his chores. Rollo tries living with various woodland animals, but he finds out that there is no place like home, and returns to his family just in time for “the best Christmas ever.”

Among the animals who take him in are an owl family, a mother bear and two rambunctious cubs, some playful river otters, a hungry lynx and a friendly moose family.

Jan Brett creates an irresistible, mischievous character that kids will recognize in themselves. Jan transports us to a glorious Scandinavian landscape where a beautiful fall turns into a magnificent snowy winter. Her signature borders depict the troll family missing Rollo, and animals as appealing as those found in The Mitten.

A warm, fun-loving Christmas picture book for families to share and love and laugh over together.

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Jesus is Born by Brenda O’Quinn

New wrinkles on an old story, Jesus is Born tells the simple truth of Christ’s birth in language that little children can understand and adults will appreciate. There’s nothing high-tech or computerized about this story, just the power of God’s love. And that alone is more than enough. After all, isn’t the thunder more powerful than the strongest microwave? The birth of a child more fascinating than the newest video craze? And so it is with the story of Jesus. The message of God’s love is direct and intentional; he gave the greatest gift. It’s a story so exciting that it doesn’t need to be enhanced by a stable animal or sung by a star – the baby Jesus is delivered straight from the hand of God. No frills, no gimmicks; just God.

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Lidia’s Christmas Kitchen by Lidia Bastainich

America’s favorite Italian-American cook, Lidia Bastianich, shares the story of the Christmases she used to celebrate in Italy with her five grandchildren.

When Lidia was a child, she spent Christmas with her grandparents, where she learned to cook with her Nonna Rosa by preparing food in their smokehouse and kitchen. Lidia and her brother would also find a big beautiful juniper bush to cut down for their holiday tree. And they made their own holiday decorations with nuts, berries, and herbs they collected for their meals.

This delightful picture book is filled with the story of Lidia’s Christmas traditions, delicious recipes, and decorating ideas all perfected over the years by Lidia and her family.

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Smudge and the Book of Mistakes – A Christmas Story by Gloria Whelan

The monastery of St. Ambrose is situated on the Irish island of Morcarrick. Here, monks old and young live quiet lives spent in prayer and service. One day the Abbot decides that Brother Bede, their finest illuminator of manuscripts, will illustrate the Christmas story. It will be magnificent, praised throughout the world (as will St. Ambrose). Unfortunately, young Brother Cuthbert has been chosen to assist Brother Bede in this project. Cuthbert is impatient, lacks discipline, and even worse—is known for making mistakes. His nickname is “Smudge.” How can someone so ill-suited assist in the creation of the greatest book of all? Award-winning author Gloria Whelan shows that sometimes, when given the right task, someone’s greatest weakness can prove to be his greatest strength.

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The Snow Bear by Holly Webb

As the snow begins to fall just days before Christmas, Grandad helps Sara build an igloo in the garden with a small snow bear to watch over it. And when Sara wakes in the middle of the night, it looks very different outside. She sets out on an enchanted journey through a world of ice, but will she ever find her way home…

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Stewie Scraps and the Super Sleigh by Sheila Blackburn

The Stewie Scraps series is ideal for reluctant boy readers, but other children will also love the stories. Stewie Scraps doesn’t do sport. He hasn’t got any time for sums or things like that, but he loves designing and making things. When Stewie’s new classmate Miles finds some old wooden skis at the back of JJ’s yard, Stewie is inspired to create the Stewie Scraps Super Sleigh. But when he sits on the driver’s seat nothing happens. Why won’t it go anywhere? Where will the Christmas magic come from?

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Three Wise Cats – A Christmas Story by Harold Konstantelos

Three Wise Cats is an inspirational tale about three cats and their journey to witness the first Christmas. The old Siamese Ptolemy was alongside his master when a star of unusual brightness was seen in the heavens, indicating an event of momentous significance, and leading to a great quest. Ptolemy must watch over his frail master, so he sends three young cats to journey in his place and fulfill the prophecy: The three shall find the one. The three are, Abishag, a sturdy reliable cat who has never shirked her duty; Kezia, a beautiful young tabby, delicate, a bit vain, but of good heart; and Ira, taller and stronger than the others, with a temper. Accompanying them is a fourth traveler— the rat Asmodeus, who can hear of no glorious thing without wanting to spoil it. Together, the unlikely band will cover many miles, and have many dangerous adventures. And finally they will come to a far land, where the star bends close to the earth over a humble stable.

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Mill by David Macaulay

The mills at Wicksbridge are imaginary, but their planning, construction, and operation are quite typical of mills developed in New England throughout the nineteenth century.

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Mosque by David Macaulay

Following in the tradition he established with Cathedral: The Story of Its Construction and in the many books he has published in the thirty years since, David Macaulay provides explanations of the how and the why in a way that is both accessible and entertaining. His work has earned numerous accolades, including a Caldecott Medal, two Caldecott Honors, and a MacArthur Grant, and many fans around the globe. With Mosque, he turns his talents toward the magnificent structures of the Ottoman Empire.

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Pyramid by David Macaulay

Through concise text and richly detailed black and white illustrations we come to know the philosophy of life and death in ancient Egypt.

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Rome Antics by David Macaulay

A pigeon carrying an important message takes the reader on a unique tour through Rome. As we follow the path of this somewhat wayward bird, we discover that Rome is a place where past and present live side by side. Every time a corner is turned there is a surprise, just as every turn of the page brings a new perspective. This juxtaposition of ancient and modern, as seen with David Macaulay’s ingenious vision, gives the reader an imaginative and informative journey through this wondrous city.

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Underground by David Macaulay

David Macaulay takes us on a visual journey through a city’s various support systems by exposing a typical section of the underground network and explaining how it works. We see a network of walls, columns, cables, pipes and tunnels required to satisfy the basic needs of a city’s inhabitants.

Existing STEAM Tiles by David Macaulay:

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Built to Last by David Macaulay

A nomad fashion’s a home that’s meant to be built and rebuilt. A family tears down an old house and erects a new one in its place. Even the Eiffel Tower wasn’t meant to be anything more than temporary. As humans, we don’t always build things to endure the test of time. Built to Last brings together the award-winning author and artist David Macaulay’s creative, exacting thinking about buildings and designs that were crafted with a strength of structure and purpose that defy the everyday: Castle, Cathedral, and Mosque. This gorgeous volume includes newly researched information about each building and how it was built. And, for the first time ever, the Caldecott Honor–winning Castle and Cathedral appear in full color—with stunning new drawings that enrich the reader’s understanding of these structures, and capture intriguing new perspectives and details. Just as the buildings themselves were created to last, our interest in the structures themselves, the people who created them, and the purposes for which they were made endures as well. This impeccably researched volume—a necessary addition to the bookshelf of anyone interested in architecture—celebrates this spirit of endurance and serves as a reminder that building well and leaving something of consequence behind, whether a building, a design, or an idea, is still of the utmost importance.

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Castle by David Macaulay

The word itself conjures up mystery, romance, intrigue, and grandeur. What could be more perfect for an author/illustrator who has continually stripped away the mystique of architectural structures that have long fascinated modern man? With typical zest and wry sense of humor punctuating his drawings, David Macaulay traces the step-by-step planning and construction of both castle and town.

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Cathedral by David Macaulay

Readers worldwide recognize Caldecott Medal winner David Macaulay’s imaginary Cathedral of Chutreaux. This critically acclaimed book has been translated into a dozen languages and remains a classic of children’s literature and a touchstone for budding architects. Cathedral’s numerous awards include a prestigious Caldecott Honor and designation as a New York Times Best Illustrated Book of the Year for Macaulay’s intricate pen-and-ink illustrations. Journey back to centuries long ago and visit the fictional people of twelfth-, thirteenth-, and fourteenth-century Europe whose dreams, like Cathedral, stand the test of time.This title has been selected as a US Common Core text exemplar (Grades 6–8, Informational Texts: Science, Mathematics, and Technical Studies).

Reviews by Overdrive

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Dinosaurs Before Dark and Dinosaurs by Mary Pope Osborne

Join Jack and Annie as they travel to the time of dinosaurs in Magic Tree House® #1: Dinosaurs Before Dark. Then uncover the facts behind the fiction in Magic Tree House® Fact Tracker: Dinosaurs. It’s two favorite ebooks in one! Find out why Mary Pope Osborne’s #1 New York Times bestselling series is such a hit with kids, parents, and teachers around the world.

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Chronicles of Dinosauria by David Woetzel

Discover why the author calls into question what we’ve been taught to believe and understand about the history of dinosaurs and man.

Every legend is said to include some grain of truth, and for years co-author Dave Woetzel has sought to separate fact from fiction as he explores mysteries related to dinosaurs, mankind’s history, and the biblical time-line. Teaming with artist and designer Richard Dobbs, the two have created a visual archive of expeditions and intriguing clues to explore, all of which highlight the connection to the authority and reliability of Scripture.

Provocative artifacts from around the world are examined in an exquisite, full-color book that hints at man’s familiarity with living dinosaurs. Studies point to more than simple answers beneath the waves of Loch Ness, and other sites around the world, many investigated personally by the author. Here is the study of cryptozoology and the discoveries that seem to defy all evolutionary time-lines, vividly illustrated and filled with rare photos.

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Curious George Dinosaur Tracks by H. A. Rey

George is taking pictures of wild animals and their tracks for his photo collection. While looking for the fawn his friend Bill spotted, he finds an unusual set of tracks. George thinks he has discovered dinosaur footprints—which would make the perfect addition to his collection! In hopes of getting a photo, he attempts to lure the dinosaur with food, but quickly remembers that some dinosaurs are not friendly. Eventually George discovers the real culprit behind the tracks and it’s not what he expects!

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Danger Dinosaurs by Frieda Wishinsky

Since discovering the Canadian Flyer, a magical time-traveling sled, in Emily’s attic, Matt and Emily have met fearsome pirates in Frobisher Bay. In Danger, Dinosaurs!, Emily and Matt are off to the Cretaceous period in the Alberta Badlands to fulfill every child’s fantasy of getting up close with a dinosaur. Maiasaura, Lambeosaurus, and T-rex, oh my! In this, the second book in the popular Canadian Flyer Adventures series, author Frieda Wishinsky weaves well-researched and accurate historical facts into her compelling, kid-friendly storytelling, while Dean Griffith’s evocative illustrations situate readers perfectly in place and time. At the end of their adventure, Emily and Matt share additional facts about dinosaurs and dinosaur hunters, and Wishinsky gives additional facts here too, in an informative Q&A format.

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Dinosaurs for Kids by Ken Ham

Within these pages kids will uncover the facts about dinosaur history from the Creation to recent discoveries. Let Ken Ham take you on a journey through time to explore these awesome wonders of God’s design. From where dinosaurs lived to what scientists assume they know about these great creatures, dinosaurs have never been this exciting, revealing and simply amazing!

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Dinosaurs from Head to Tail by Stacey Roderick

Dig into Dinosaurs from Head to Tail for colorful close-ups of weird and wondrous prehistoric parts. Take a guess which dino they belong to and then turn the page for fun facts about each creature. Which one had a crested head? Who sported claws as long as baseball bats? Stomping through the pages are familiar favorites like the Tyrannosaurus and lesser-known beasts like the Parasaurolophus. Dinosaur fans will be roaring for more!

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D is for Dinosaur by Ken and Mally Ham

D is for Dinosaur is a proven resource that makes learning the Bible fun. This revised classic from Ken and Mally Ham shares biblical insights of Noah’s Ark and the Genesis Flood to a new generation of families. Inside a parent or teacher finds all that’s needed to share the basic truths of the Gospel from A to Z, and to expand that teaching through detailed instructional tips and structured learning. The entertaining ABC rhymes and humorous illustrations will truly engage young children, while the text shares God’s Word in an “easy-to-learn” style.

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Tea Rex by Molly Idle

Some tea parties are for grown-ups.
Some are for girls.
But this tea party is for a very special guest.
And it is important to follow some rules . . .
like providing comfortable chairs,
and good conversation,
and yummy food.
But sometimes that is not enough for special guests,
especially when their manners are more Cretaceous than gracious . . .

Introducing Tea Rex, a guest that just about any child would love to have to tea!

reviews by Overdrive

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Easter Fun by Linda Standee

Have fun with faith using Easter Fun for grades 1–3! This 32-page book helps children observe the Lenten season through expressive art and craft activities, fun recipes, and an assortment of engaging puzzles. The meaningful activities delight young believers and prepare their hearts for Resurrection Sunday. The book also includes reproducibles and an answer key.

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My First Story of Easter by Tim Dowley

Tim Dowley’s My First Story of Easter retells the biblical account in simple terms, complete with bright, cheery illustrations that are sure to put a smile on the face of the reader. This Easter, give the children in your life the best gift of all-a story that explains the reason for celebration!

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Easter Eggs for Anya by Virginia Kroll

A Ukrainian Celebration of New Life in Christ Children love coloring Easter eggs, and here’s a story to explain one of the origins of this tradition. In early nineteenth-century Ukraine, Christians celebrated Easter by exchanging colorful, hand-decorated pysanky eggs—but with Papa away at the war and Mama is struggling to make ends meet, Anya’s family was too poor to buy eggs to decorate one year. That is, until Anya discovered an abandoned nest of goose eggs and began planning an Easter surprise for her family. But God had an even better surprise in store, and when the eggs unexpectedly began to hatch, Anya learned what the Easter story teaches: spring brings gifts of myriad new beginnings, just as the risen Christ gave the gift of new life to us all. Each Traditions of Faith book features a story of how significant Christian traditions emerged in cultures around the world, with a note about the origin and history of the tradition, and offers ideas and activities each family can adopt as its own.

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The Berenstain Bears and the Easter Story

‘He has risen!’ Mark 16:6 Brother and Sister have come to value all the candy and Easter eggs they get on Easter morning. But a much more important value gets emphasized one Eastern morn when Papa read them the Easter story (featuring people not bears).

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Amazing Journey by Susie Poole

An accurate retelling of Christ’s death from creation to the cross that helps children learn the meaning of the resurrection.

The Absorbent Mind

The Absorbent Mind by Maria Montessori as well as The Montessori Method and the Montessori Reader

The Absorbent Mind was Maria Montessori’s most in-depth work on her educational theory, based on decades of scientific observation of children. Her view on children and their absorbent minds was a landmark departure from the educational model at the time. This book helped start a revolution in education. Since this book first appeared there have been both cognitive and neurological studies that have confirmed what Maria Montessori knew decades ago.

A Biblical Home Education

A Biblical Home Education by Ruth Beechick

One of the most trusted homeschool voices today explains why and how the Bible should be the center of classroom learning and provides teaching helps for parents.

The Case for Classical Education

A Case for Classical Education by Douglas Wilson

America’s public schools are failing. Douglas Wilson advocates are turn to classical Christian education with its discipline, hard work, and recovery of the ancient division of learning geared to child development stages.

Every Child Can Succeed

Every Child Can Succeed  and The Way They Learn by Cynthia Ulrich Tobias

This enlightening source shows parents how to utilize a “learning styles” approach to help their kids live up to their potential and find success in life.

The Everything Homeschooling Book

The Everything Homeschooling Book by Sherri Linselbach

Homeschooling isn’t about teaching—it’s about learning together with your child. In this indispensible guide, author and homeschooler Sherri Linsenbach provides you with the encouragement, inspiration, and ideas you need to explore this option for your family. It’s packed full of ideas to make the experience easy, affordable, and, most of all, fun. Even veteran homeschoolers will find new ideas and techniques that help keep home education interesting and exciting.

Family Matters

Family Matters by David Guterson

An honest, perceptive discussion of children, education, and our common life as a nation by the bestselling author of Snow Falling on Cedars. A high school English teacher, Guterson and his wife educate their own children at home. “A literate primer for anyone who wants to know more about alternatives to the schools” (Kirkus Reviews).

Home Learning Year by Year

Home Learning Year by Year by Rebecca Rupp

Finally, homeschoolers have a comprehensive guide to designing a homeschool curriculum, from one of the country’s foremost homeschooling experts. , Rebecca Rupp presents a structured plan to ensure that your children will learn what they need to know when they need to know it, from preschool through high school. Based on the traditional pre-K through 12th-grade structure, Home Learning Year by Year features:

The integral subjects to be covered within each grade

Standards for knowledge that should be acquired by your child at each level

Recommended books to use as texts for every subject

Guidelines for the importance of each topic: which knowledge is essential and which is best for more expansive study based on your child’s personal interests

Suggestions for how to sensitively approach less academic subjects, such as sex education and physical fitness

Homeschooling Methods

Homeschooling Methods by Paul and Gena Suarez

Details the most viable homeschool education models, helping parents formulate an educational game plan and choose teaching methodologies.

Reviews by Overdrive

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Entrepreneurship: Create Your Own Business with 25 Projects (Grades 4-6)

From the early days of traders and trappers to today’s global online marketplace, business is the glue that holds our world together. In Entrepreneurship: Create Your Own Business, children learn what it takes to transform a great idea into their own new business. Through plenty of hands-on activities, art and history meet economics and math while young readers gain a solid understanding of how a business works.
Kids use familiar resources to develop a business idea of their own, create a presentation for potential investors, and utilize basic cost and price analysis worksheets. The skills they learn by writing a business plan, creating a prototype of an item to sell, designing packaging, and finding ways to advertise their products translate into language, math, and problem-solving skills that are relevant across all subjects. Cartoon illustrations, fun facts, and interviews with successful entrepreneurs make Entrepreneurship entertaining and informative. Supplemental materials include a glossary, list of resources, and an index.