New on OverDrive!

Check out the latest reads on OverDrive eLibrary!  We have purchased some more Read Along formatted books, STEAM books, and fiction for your enjoyment!  Read Along books are highly recommended for students who need help with improving their level of reading proficiency as they develop from read aloud, to read along and then read appropriately.

Read Along Books

Grandfather’s Journey

When he was a young man, Allen Say’s grandfather left his home in Japan to explore the world. He began his journey by crossing the Pacific Ocean on a steamship, then wandered the deserts, farmlands, and cities of North America. Allen Say lovingly tells the story of his own family’s cross-cultural history in elegant watercolor paintings that earned him a Caldecott Medal in 1994. This twentieth-anniversary edition of the modern classic features read-aloud audio and a new introduction by Allen Say.

Mooncakes by Loretta Seto

Mooncakes is the lyrical story of a young girl who shares the special celebration of the Chinese Moon Festival with her parents. As they eat mooncakes, drink tea and watch the night sky together, Mama and Baba tell ancient tales of a magical tree that can never be cut down, the Jade Rabbit who came to live on the moon and one brave woman’s journey to eternal life. With a gentle focus on the importance of family, Mooncakes is both a perfect book for parent and child to read together, and an ideal choice for schools and libraries.

Waiting for the Whales by Sheryl MacFarlane

In this timeless classic set on the West Coast, an old man lives alone on a bluff overlooking the sea, tends his garden and waits. Only when the whales return each year to the bay in front of his cottage is his loneliness eased. One day his daughter and her baby return home to live with the old man, bringing a renewed sense of purpose to his life. As his granddaughter grows, the old man passes on a wealth of knowledge and wisdom as well as his passion for the whales. And each year they wait together for the whales to appear.

Hurricane by David Wiesner

When a storm is raging, David and George are glad to be inside the house, snug and safe. In this spectacular picture book by Caldecott Honor recipient David Wisener, a fallen tree becomes the threshold to the limitless voyage of the imagination, which David and George share as only true friends—and brothers—can.

New Non-Fiction

A House in the Skye by Steve Jenkins

Caldecott Honor recipient Steve Jenkins shines as the author of this amusing and thorough introduction to animal homes.
Turtles, birds, fish, beavers, and kangaroos are just like people—they need homes, and take up residence in unusual places. A simple main text introduces similarities between human and animal homes while sidebars detail the unique qualities of each animal and its home. Stylized yet realistic watercolor illustrations prove that nonfiction can be accurate and elegant, and readers of all ages will appreciate this layered narrative.

Alexander Graham Bell for Kids by Mary Kay Carson

This unique biography includes a time line, a list of online resources, and 21 engaging hands-on activities to better appreciate Bell’s remarkable accomplishments. Kids will:
Construct a Pie Tin Telegraph and a Pizza Box Phonograph
“See” and “feel” sound by building simple devices
Communicate using American Sign Language
Send secret messages using Morse code
Investigate the properties of ailerons on a paper airplane
Build and fly a tetrahedral kite
And more!

The Man who Invented the Ferris Wheel by Dani Sneed

George Washington Gale Ferris, Jr. was an American engineer. He graduated from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, NY, where he was a member of the Rensselaer Society of Engineers, in the class of 1881 with a degree in Civil Engineering. He was made a member of the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Alumni Hall of Fame in 1998. He is most famous for creating the original Ferris Wheel for the 1893 Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition.

To the Moon by Jeffrey Kluger

The exciting and inspiring true story of Apollo 8, the first crewed spaceship to break free of the Earth’s orbit and reach the moon, by the best-selling author of Apollo 13.
What’s more exciting that spaceships and astronauts? How about a spaceship carrying the first astronauts ever to see the moon first hand — on Christmas!  This book about the exciting and inspiring true story of Apollo 8, the first crewed spaceship to break free of Earth’s orbit and each the moon, tells the story of these three brave men, the frantic rush to get their rocket ready, and the journey that gave the American people — and the world — a new look at the planet we live on and the corner of space we inhabit.
Filled with the science and training required to put a person into space, and every detail of what it’s like to live in a spaceship for days on end (including what happens when astronauts need to use the bathroom), this book is sure to leave kids clamoring for a spot on the next mission to outerspace.

New Fiction

Renegade by Ted Dekker

One of the chosen has gone renegade… Turning his back on all that he once believed, Billos enters the forbidden book and lands in a reality that is as foreign to him as water is to oil. A place called Paradise, Colorado, where he discovers he has strange new powers given to him courtesy of a mysterious figure known as Marsuvees Black. The chosen four have survived the desert, escaped the Black Forest, battled the Horde, and added a spirited refugee to their number. But nothing has prepared them for the showdown that Billos, the renegade, will lure them into.

The House that Lou Built by Mae Respico

A coming-of-age story that explores culture and family, forgiveness and friendship, and what makes a true home. Perfect for fans of Wendy Mass and Joan Bauer.
Lou Bulosan-Nelson has the ultimate summer DIY project. She’s going to build her own “tiny house,” 100 square feet all her own. She shares a room with her mom in her grandmother’s house, and longs for a place where she can escape her crazy but lovable extended Filipino family. Lou enjoys her woodshop class and creating projects, and she plans to build the house on land she inherited from her dad, who died before she was born. But then she finds out that the land may not be hers for much longer.
Lou discovers it’s not easy to save her land, or to build a house. But she won’t give up; with the help of friends and relatives, her dream begins to take shape, and she learns the deeper meaning of home and family.

Journey to the River Sea by Eva Ibbotson

An Amazon adventure set in the wilderness of Brazil, Journey to the River Sea is filled with mystery and memorable characters.

It is 1910 and Maia, tragically orphaned at thirteen, has been sent from England to start a new life with distant relatives in Manaus, hundreds of miles up the Amazon. She is accompanied by an eccentric and mysterious governess who has secret reasons of her own for making the journey. Both soon discover an exotic world bursting with new experiences in Journey to the River Sea, Eva Ibbotson’s highly colourful, joyous adventure.

Winner of the Smarties Gold Medal.
Shortlisted for the Carnegie Medal and the Whitbread Award.

Train to Somewhere by Eve Bunting

Gr 2-4-From the mid-19th century until after World War I, thousands of homeless “orphans” were sent West by charitable agencies to find homes with families seeking workers, children to adopt, or mother’s helpers. In telling the story of one child, Bunting encapsulates the fears and sometimes happy endings of those fateful trips. Marianne is among the oldest and least attractive of the 14 children sent on a train to the Midwest, and she starts the journey with hopes that her mother will be waiting at one of the stops. At each station, papers are signed and children are placed, until only Marianne remains when the last town of Somewhere is reached. Only an elderly couple, hoping for a boy, is waiting there. They look kindly at Marianne, and the grandmotherly wife sums up the story’s theme when she remarks that “Sometimes what you get turns out to be better than what you wanted in the first place.” By making this slice of American history into an appealing tale, Bunting offers an opportunity to compare present-day social policies with those of times past. The book is timely yet universal in showing the desire of every child for a loving family. Himler’s full-page, bordered paintings portray the people and towns in warm colors and softly blended brush strokes. Beyond this gentle story lie the social issues of our own day.-Shirley Wilton, Ocean County College, Toms River, NJ

Indian Horse by Richard Wagamese

“An unforgettable work of art.”—The National Post

Saul Indian Horse is dying. Tucked away in a hospice high above the clash and clang of a big city, he embarks on a marvellous journey of imagination back through the life he led as a northern Ojibway, with all its sorrows and joys.

With compassion and insight, author Richard Wagamese traces through his fictional characters the decline of a culture and a cultural way. For Saul, taken forcibly from the land and his family when he’s sent to residential school, salvation comes for a while through his incredible gifts as a hockey player. But in the harsh realities of 1960s Canada, he battles obdurate racism and the spirit-destroying effects of cultural alienation and displacement.

Indian Horse unfolds against the bleak loveliness of northern Ontario, all rock, marsh, bog and cedar. Wagamese writes with a spare beauty, penetrating the heart of a remarkable Ojibway man. Drawing on his great-grandfather’s mystical gift of vision, Saul Indian Horse comes to recognize the influence of everyday magic on his own life. In this wise and moving novel, Richard Wagamese shares that gift of magic with readers as well.