Picture Books for Older Students

Picture Books on Overdrive for Older Students

There are many reasons why you might want to use picture books with your older students. This first chapter from The Power of Picture Books by Mary Jo Fresca and Peggy Harkin gives some great reasons for opening up picture books to older students. We hope this wide variety of picture books in Overdrive may help you to hook your students in and expand their excitement for learning.

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A Drop Around the World by Barbara Shaw McKinney (and Teacher’s Guide)

This book is a year-after-year favorite with teachers. It engagingly leads readers around the world following a drop of water—whether as steam or snow, inside a plant or animal, or underground—teaching the wonders and importance of the water cycle. (There is lots of geography, too.) Four pages of science about the qualities of water are included.

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Africa is not a Country by Mark Milnicove

Enter into the daily life of children in the many countries of modern Africa. Countering stereotypes, Africa Is Not a Country celebrates the extraordinary diversity of this vibrant continent as experienced by children at home, at school, at work, and at play.

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Alejandro’s Gift by Richard E. Albert

This uplifting story about one man’s gift to the desert and the gift he receives in return has a powerful environmental lesson.

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Alfred Nobel by Kathy-jo Wargin

Almost everyone has heard of the Nobel Prize, a collection of prizes awarded for accomplishments in science, medicine, literature, and peace. But few people know about the man who established the award and for whom it is named, Alfred Nobel. Alfred Nobel was born in Sweden in 1833. A quick and curious mind, combined with a love of science and chemistry, drove him to invent numerous technological devices throughout his long life. But he is perhaps most well known for his invention of dynamite. Intending it to help safely advance road and bridge construction, Nobel saw his most famous invention used in the development of military weaponry. After a newspaper headline mistakenly announces his death, Nobel was inspired to leave a legacy of another sort. The Man Behind the Peace Prize tells the story of the enduring legacy of Alfred Nobel.Kathy-jo Wargin is the bestselling author of more than 30 books for children. Among her many awards for her work are an International Reading Association Children’s Choice Award for The Legend of the Loon and an IRA Teachers’ Choice Award for Win One for the Gipper. She lives in the Great Lakes area. Zachary Pullen’s character-oriented picture book illustrations have won awards and garnered starred reviews. He has been honored several times with acceptance into the prestigious Society of Illustrators juried shows and Communication Arts Illustration Annual of the best in current illustration. Zachary lives in Wyoming.

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Almost to Freedom by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson

Lindy and her doll Sally are best friends – wherever Lindy goes, Sally stays right by her side. They eat together, sleep together, and even pick cotton together. So, on the night Lindy and her mama run away in search of freedom, Sally goes too. This young girl’s rag doll vividly narrates her enslaved family’s courageous escape through the Underground Railroad. At once heart-wrenching and uplifting, this story about friendship and the strength of the human spirit will touch the lives of all readers long after the journey has ended.

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Always an Olivia by Carolivia Herron

An elderly black grandmother passes on the story of the family’s Jewish origins to her young granddaughter, Carol Olivia. As family members flee the Spanish Inquisition, are kidnapped by pirates and eventually sail to America, one daughter in each generation is given the name Olivia, from the Hebrew Shulamit meaning “peace,” to honor the Jewish part of their ancestry. Critically-acclaimed author Carolivia Herron (Nappy Hair) shares this engaging, multicultural tale is based on her own family’s heritage.

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Amos and Boris by William Steig

Amos the mouse and Boris the whale: a devoted pair of friends with nothing at all in common, except good hearts and a willingness to help their fellow mammal. They meet after Amos sets out to sea in his homemade boat, the Rodent, and soon finds himself in extreme need of rescue. Enter Boris. But there will come a day, long after Boris has gone back to a life of whaling about and Amos has gone back to his life of mousing around, when the tiny mouse must find a way to rescue the great whale.
The tender yet comical story of this friendship is recorded in text and pictures that are a model of rich simplicity. Here, with apparent ease and concealed virtuosity, Caldecott medalist William Steig brings two winning heroes to life.

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Angelo by David Macaulay

High above the rooftops of Rome, Angelo begins his work restoring the façade of a once glorious church. There, among the sticks and feathers, he discovers a wounded bird. Angelo becomes the bird’s reluctant savior. As the church nears completion, Angelo begins to worry about the future of his avian friend. “What will become of you? Where will you go . . . where will you . . . live?” he asks her. Through his artistry as a master craftsman he answers the questions for his humble friend and assures that he, himself will not be forgotten.

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Ballet for Martha by Jan Greenberg

A picture book about the making of Martha Graham’s Appalachian Spring, her most famous dance performance

Martha Graham : trailblazing choreographer

Aaron Copland : distinguished American composer

Isamu Noguchi : artist, sculptor, craftsman

Award-winning authors Jan Greenberg and Sandra Jordan tell the story behind the scenes of the collaboration that created APPALACHIAN SPRING, from its inception through the score’s composition to Martha’s intense rehearsal process. The authors’ collaborator is two-time Sibert Honor winner Brian Floca, whose vivid watercolors bring both the process and the performance to life.

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Baseball Saved Us by Ken Mochizuki

These collaborators’ prepossessing debut book introduces readers to a significant and often-neglected–for children, at any rate–chapter in U.S. history: the internment of Japanese-Americans during WW II. The nameless narrator and his family inhabit a camp in the parched American desert, where life becomes a bit more bearable after the internees build a baseball field, and the boy gains self-worth by hitting a championship home run. Although Mochizuki’s stylish prose evocatively details the harsh injustice of the camps, some may feel the book suffers from uneven pacing. An introduction and much of the text are spent on background, leaving little time devoted to the actual camp regimen. In addition, the ending, in which the hero returns to school after the war and is again saved from prejudice by baseball, seems tacked on. Lee’s stirring illustrations were inspired by Ansel Adams’s photographs of the Manzanar internment camp. In the muted browns, sepias and golds of the desert, the artist movingly conveys the bleakness of camp life, with its cramped quarters, swirling dust storms and armed guards. The baseball scenes’ motion and excitement lend effective contrast; the final illustration stands in particularly moving counterpoint to the earlier rigors. Ages 4-up.

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The Bicycle Man by Allen Say

The amazing tricks two American soldiers perform on a borrowed bicycle are a fitting finale for the school sports day festivities in a small village in occupied Japan.

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Black and White by David Macaulay

Four stories are told simultaneously, with each double-page spread divided into quadrants. The stories do not necessarily take place at the same moment in time, but are they really one story? You’ll have to read this award winner and find out.

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Bone by Bone by Sara C. Levine

What animal would you be if your finger bones grew so long that they reached your feet? Or what if you had no leg bones but kept your arm bones? This picture book will keep you guessing as you read about how human skeletons are like—and unlike—those of other animals.

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The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind by William Kamkwamba

The New York Times bestselling memoir of the heroic young inventor who brought electricity to his Malawian village is now perfect for young readers

When a terrible drought struck William Kamkwamba’s tiny village in Malawi, his family lost all of the season’s crops, leaving them with nothing to eat and nothing to sell. William began to explore science books in his village library, looking for a solution. There, he came up with the idea that would change his family’s life forever: he could build a windmill. Made out of scrap metal and old bicycle parts, William’s windmill brought electricity to his home and helped his family pump the water they needed to farm the land.

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Brave Irene by William Steig

Brave Irene is Irene Bobbin, the dressmaker’s daughter. Her mother, Mrs. Bobbin, isn’t feeling so well and can’t possibly deliver the beautiful ball gown she’s made for the duchess to wear that very evening. So plucky Irene volunteers to get the gown to the palace on time, in spite of the fierce snowstorm that’s brewing— quite an errand for a little girl. But where there’s a will, there’s a way, as Irene proves in the danger-fraught adventure that follows. She must defy the wiles of the wicked wind, her most formidable opponent, and overcome many obstacles before she completes her mission. Surely, this winning heroine will inspire every child to cheer her on.

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Brothers of the Wolf (The First Beaver and The First Mosquito) by Caroll Simpson

“Prior to contact, our children were taught important life lessons through stories. Caroll has captured the essence of this through her beautifully illustrated books . . . Caroll’s work is not only timely, it is vital.”—Robert Charlie, former chief of the Ts’il Kaz Koh First Nation

This is the tale two wolf cubs found and raised in a village on the Pacific coast as human children. The wolf cub brothers, Tkope and Klale, are very different from one another. One feels most at home in the forest, while the other is more comfortable in the sea. When they undergo a supernatural transformation, one turns into a Sea Wolf and one turns into a Timber Wolf. Although they are separated, their howling voices unite at regular intervals, waking up Moon and saving the world from uncertain darkness.Taking inspiration from the legends and visual art of Northwest Coast First Nations, this beautifully illustrated story is ideally suited to children aged six to nine.

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Bully by Patricia Polacco

Patricia Polacco takes on cliques and online bullying
Lyla finds a great friend in Jamie on her first day of school, but when Lyla makes the cheerleading squad and a clique of popular girls invites her to join them, Jamie is left behind. Lyla knows bullying when she sees it, though, and when she sees the girls viciously teasing classmates on Facebook, including Jamie, she is smart enough to get out. But no one dumps these girls, and now they’re out for revenge.
Patricia Polacco has taken up the cause against bullies ever since Thank You, Mr. Falker, and her passion shines through in this powerful story of a girl who stands up for a friend.

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Bunny the Brave War Horse by Elizabeth MacLeod

With a name like Bunny, the long-eared horse doesn’t seem like an obvious choice to ship off to war. But through burning gas attacks, miserable weather and ever-present cross fire, Bunny proves himself invaluable, especially to the men who ride him. This is a heartwarming story of a World War I war horse who was as brave and strong as any soldier. Important historical context is provided in the end matter, and all historical details have been vetted for accuracy by expert reviewers.

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The Butter Man by Elizabeth Alalou

While Nora waits impatiently for dinner, her father stirs up a story from his childhood. During a famine Nora’s grandfather must travel over the mountains to find work so he can provide food for his family. While young Ali waits for his father’s return, he learns a lesson of patience, perseverance, and hope.

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Child of the Civil Rights Movement by Paula Young Shelton

In this Bank Street College of Education Best Children’s Book of the Year, Paula Young Shelton, daughter of Civil Rights activist Andrew Young, brings a child’s unique perspective to an important chapter in America’s history. Paula grew up in the deep south, in a world where whites had and blacks did not. With an activist father and a community of leaders surrounding her, including Uncle Martin (Martin Luther King), Paula watched and listened to the struggles, eventually joining with her family—and thousands of others—in the historic march from Selma to Montgomery. Poignant, moving, and hopeful, this is an intimate look at the birth of the Civil Rights Movement.

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A Dog for a Friend by Marilynn Reynolds

Jessie lives with her parents on a farm a long way from anywhere. There are no other people for miles around. Often, she is lonely. More than anything, Jessie wants a dog; a friend who will play with her, come running when she calls and sleep with its head on her lap. Her mother and father can’t see any need for a dog on a wheat farm. Besides, there’s so much work to do. They don’t have time for a pet. Jessie will just have to wait.But one autumn night, the sow in the barn has her litter, and Jessie notices one piglet who is smaller and weaker than the others. When the little runt begins to ail, Jessie persuades her father to bring it into the house so it can be nursed back to health. At last Jessie has what she really wanted all along-a friend who needed her.Set on the prairies during the 1920’s, A Dog for a Friend is a heartwarming story about the aching need for companionship that every child will identify with and understand.

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Eagle’s Reflection (Salmon Journey, Grizzly’s Home, Nature’s Circle and Orca’s Family) by Robert James Challenger

This collection of short stories is based on traditional values important to us all—respect, cooperation and kindness. Robert James Challenger’s illustrations and tales reveal a world of magical birds, fish and other wildlife, who teach readers lessons about life and the world.

Seal shows us why we should not let fear of failing stop us from trying new things. Hummingbird helps us appreciate the beauty in our world. Kingfisher teaches us how to believe in ourselves. Coho learns the rewards of not giving up. Discover why a river’s spirit stones are important to Salmon, why we should listen carefully to the message in Wolf’s cry, and why Orca tries to turn rocks into grains of sand.

As appealing to parents and teachers as they are to children, Jim Challenger’s stories convey beautifully the merits of watching, listening to and respecting our natural world.

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Everlasting Embrace by Gabrielle Emanuel

Each morning as the sun brightens the West African sky, mother and child prepare to start their day. They spend it bound together, the child riding on the mother’s back watching their world go past. Pounding millet, drawing water from the well, visiting friends, shopping at the outdoor market—days are shared in perfect step with one another. And even when the child grows big enough to go off and explore their world, the everlasting embrace endures. Illustrated with E.B. Lewis’s stunning watercolors that bring to life the land and people of Mali, Gabrielle Emanuel’s tender story celebrates the universal bond between mother and child.

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Everybody Cooks Rice by Norah Dooley

In this multicultural picture book, Carrie goes from one neighbor’s house to the next looking for her brother, who is late for dinner. She discovers that although each family is from a different country, everyone makes a rice dish at dinnertime. Readers will enjoy trying the simple recipes that correspond to each family’s unique rice dish.

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Faithful Elephants by Ted Lewin

A sobering lesson about the horrors of war is depicted through the fate of three elephants at the Ueno Zoo in Tokyo during World War II.

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The Fantastic Undersea Life of Jacques Cousteau by Dan Yaccarino

Jacques Cousteau was the world’s ambassador of the oceans. His popular TV series brought whales, otters, and dolphins right into people’s living rooms. Now, in this exciting picturebook biography, Dan Yaccarino introduces young readers to the man behind the snorkel.
From the first moment he got a glimpse of what lived under the ocean’s waves, Cousteau was hooked. And so he set sail aboard the Calypso to see the sea. He and his team of scientists invented diving equipment and waterproof cameras. They made films and televisions shows and wrote books so they could share what they learned. The oceans were a vast unexplored world, and Cousteau became our guide. And when he saw that pollution was taking its toll on the seas, Cousteau became our guide in how to protect the oceans as well.

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Finn McCool and the Great Fish by Eve Bunting

Finn McCool is the largest giant in all of Ireland. He’s a fierce warrior, even beating the giant Culcullan and saving Ireland from the Scots. Helpful and kind, he helps the farmers bring in the hay. And everyone in the village of Drumnahoon admires him. “He’s the best-hearted man that ever walked on Ireland’s green grass.” But for all his strength, courage, and goodness, there’s one thing that Finn lacks. He’s just not smart. And he knows it. When a wise man living in a nearby village tells Finn about a magical red salmon with the wisdom of the world, Finn sets out to catch the fish. And he learns a thing or two about himself in the process.

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Fish for Jimmy by Katie Yamasaki

For two boys in a Japanese American family, everything changed when Japan bombed Pearl Harbor and the United States went to war. With the family forced to leave their home and go to an internment camp, Jimmy loses his appetite. Older brother Taro takes matters into his own hands and, night after night, sneaks out of the camp and catches fresh fish for Jimmy to help make him strong again. This affecting tale of courage and love is an adaptation of the author’s true family story.

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Follow the Drinking Gourd by Jeanette Winter

“Winter’s story begins with a peg-leg sailor who aids slaves on their escape on the Underground Railroad. While working for plantation owners, Peg Leg Joe teaches the slaves a song about the drinking gourd (the Big Dipper). A couple, their son, and two others make their escape by following the song’s directions. Rich paintings interpret the strong story in a clean, primitive style enhanced by bold colors. The rhythmic compositions have an energetic presence that’s compelling. A fine rendering of history in picturebook format.”–(starred) Booklist.

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Follow the Moon Home by Philippe Cousteau

Acclaimed activist Philippe Cousteau and renowned author Deborah Hopkinson team up to offer a story of the powerful difference young people can make in the world. Meet Viv, who has a new home and a new school by the sea, and follow her as she finds her way in a new place and helps bring together a whole community to save the sea turtles of the South Carolina coast.

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Frankly, I Never Wanted to Kiss Anybody! by Nancy Loewen

OF COURSE you think I needed a kiss from a beautiful princess to end my “toadally” awful curse. You don’t know the other side of the story. Well, let me tell you…

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Galileo’s Leaning Tower Experiment by Wendy Macdonald

When the scientist Galileo befriends a bright farm boy, Massimo, the two begin to investigate the science of motion.

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Ghost Train by Paul Yee

Winner of the Governor General’s Award, the Amelia Frances Howard-Gibbon Illustrator’s Award, the Elizabeth Mrazik-Cleaver Award and the Ruth Schwartz Award

This powerful, unforgettable and multi-award-winning tale is based on the lives of the Chinese who settled on the west coast of North America in the early 1900s.

Left behind in China by her father, who has gone to North America to find work, Choon-yi has made her living by selling her paintings in the market. When her father writes one day and asks her to join him, she joyously sets off, only to discover that he has been killed. Choon-yi sees the railway and the giant train engines that her father died for, and she is filled with an urge to paint them.

But her work disappoints her until a ghostly presence beckons her to board the train where she meets the ghosts of the men who died building the railway. She is able to give them peace by returning their bones to China where they were born.

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The Good Garden by Katie Smith Milway

María’s family are poor Honduran farmers, growing barely enough to eat. Then a new teacher comes to town and shows María sustainable farming practices that yield good crops. An inspiring story, based on actual events, that shows us how farms and hopes are transformed as good gardens begin to grow.

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Grandfather’s Journey by Allen Say

A picture book masterpiece from Caldecott medal winner Allen Say now available in paperback!

Lyrical, breathtaking, splendid—words used to describe Allen Say’s Grandfather’s Journey when it was first published. At once deeply personal yet expressing universally held emotions, this tale of one man’s love for two countries and his constant desire to be in both places captured readers’ attention and hearts. Fifteen years later, it remains as historically relevant and emotionally engaging as ever.

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hello! hello! by Matthew Cordell

Outside the world is bright and colorful, but Lydia’s family is too busy with their gadgets to notice. She says Hello to everyone. Hello? Hello! Her father says hello while texting, her mother says hello while working on her laptop and her brother doesn’t say hello at all. The T.V shouts Hello! But she doesn’t want to watch any shows. Lydia, now restless, ventures outside. There are so many things to say hello to! Hello rocks! Hello leaves! Hello flowers! When Lydia comes back home she decides to show her family what she has found, and it’s hello world and goodbye gadgets!

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How Coyote Stole the Summer by Stephen Krensky

Brrr! Coyote is always cold! That’s because it’s winter all year long. But Old Woman has something amazing called summer. It’s tied up in a little bag in her tipi. Coyote and his friends Wolf, Moose, Elk, Stag, and Antelope make a plan to steal summer. But when Coyote grabs the bag, Old Woman’s children chase after him. Will his plan work? Will everyone have a chance to share summer’s warmth? Find out what happens in this fast-paced tale!

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I Am an Artist by Pat Lowery Collins

Are you an artist? Do you see the world around you in a special way? I Am an Artist shows you how simply observing the delights of nature can inspire you to create. Can you name the colors inside a seashell? You’re an artist!

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If the World were a Village by David J. Smith

This bestseller is newly revised with updated statistics, new activities and completely new material on food security, energy and health. By shrinking the planet down to a village of just 100 people, children will discover how to grow up global and establish their own place in the world village.

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I Want my Hat Back by Jon Klassen

The bear’s hat is gone, and he wants it back. Patiently and politely, he asks the animals he comes across, one by one, whether they have seen it. Each animal says no, some more elaborately than others. But just as the bear begins to despond, a deer comes by and asks a simple question that sparks the bear’s memory and renews his search with a vengeance. Told completely in dialogue, this delicious take on the classic repetitive tale plays out in sly illustrations laced with visual humor— and winks at the reader with a wry irreverence that will have kids of all ages thrilled to be in on the joke.

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The Iridescence of Birds by Patricia MacLachlan

If you were a boy named Henri Matisse who lived in a dreary town in northern France, what would your life be like? Would it be full of color and art? Full of lines and dancing figures?

Find out in this beautiful, unusual picture book about one of the world’s most famous and influential artists by acclaimed author and Newbery Medal-winning Patricia MacLachlan and innovative illustrator Hadley Hooper.

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The Lamp, the Ice and the Boat by Jacqueline Briggs Martin

The Lamp, the Ice, and the Boat Called Fish tells the dramatic story of the Canadian Arctic expedition that set off in 1913 to explore the high north.

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Life in the Ocean by Claire A. Nivola

Sylvia Earle first lost her heart to the ocean as a young girl when she discovered the wonders of the Gulf of Mexico in her backyard. As an adult, she dives even deeper. Whether she’s designing submersibles, swimming with the whales, or taking deep-water walks, Sylvia Earle has dedicated her life to learning more about what she calls “the blue heart of the planet.” With stunningly detailed pictures of the wonders of the sea, Life in the Ocean tells the story of Sylvia’s growing passion and how her ocean exploration and advocacy have made her known around the world. This picture book biography also includes an informative author’s note that will motivate young environmentalists.

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Lifetimes by David L. Rice (and Teacher Guide)

Teachers and parents, this book is an outstanding teaching resource, much more than the title might suggest. Beginning with: A lifetime for a mayfly is about one day, it presents 24 lifetimes such as that of an earthworm (about six years), a giant sequoia (about 2,000 years), a bacteria (well, that depends), a dinosaur (never again) and the universe (about 15 to 20 billion years). Each example comes with detailed illustrations and something to ponder, such as, for earthworms: Worms teach us that our work can be very important, even if it cannot be seen. Each plant or animal is practically a lesson plan in itself, with tell about it, think about it, and look it up challenges. Written by a retired teacher, this is a favorite book for children and teachers alike.

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The Man Who Walked Between Two Towers by Mordicai Gerstein

In 1974, French aerialist Philippe Petit threw a tightrope between the two towers of the World Trade Center and spent an hour walking, dancing, and performing high-wire tricks a quarter mile in the sky. This picture book captures the poetry and magic of the event with a poetry of its own: lyrical words and lovely paintings that present the detail, daring, and—in two dramatic foldout spreads— the vertiginous drama of Petit’s feat.

The Man Who Walked Between the Towers is the winner of the 2004 Caldecott Medal, the winner of the 2004 Boston Globe – Horn Book Award for Picture Books, and the winner of the 2006 Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Children’s Video.

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The Market Bowl by Jim Averbeck

Yoyo has listened to Mama Cécile’s song about how to make ndolé (bitterleaf stew) her entire life—long enough to know how to make it herself, now that she is finally old enough. But slicing the bitterleaf, grinding the pumpkin, measuring out the shrimp—it just takes too long. Yoyo is confident that her variation on the stew will be good enough. As Mama Cécile and Yoyo set off to market, Mama reminds Yoyo what will happen if she refuses a fair price for the stew—Brother Coin, the Great Spirit of the Market, will put a curse on their market bowl. When Yoyo refuses to heed Mama’s advice, she is faced with the task of trying to regain a blessing from the god himself. An original folktale set in modern-day Cameroon, THE MARKET BOWL teaches readers a lesson about patience, humility, and the value of a fair price. Back matter includes further information about Cameroon and its people and traditions as well as a recipe for ndolé—Cameroon’s national food dish.

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Mimi’s Village and (One Hen) by Katie Smith Milway

In this addition to the CitizenKid™ collection of inspiring stories from around the globe, Mimi Malaho and her family help bring basic health care to their community. By making small changes like sleeping under mosquito nets and big ones like building a clinic with outside help, the Malahos and their neighbors transform their Kenyan village from one afraid of illness to a thriving community.

“A great resource for introducing children to the issues surrounding global health and empowering them to get involved.” — Ophelia Dahl, Executive Director, Partners In Health

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Mrs. Katz and Tush by Patricia Polacco

In this special Passover story, Larnel Moore, a young African-American boy, and Mrs. Katz, an elderly Jewish woman, develop an unusual friendship through their mutual concern for an abandoned cat named Tush. Together they explore the common themes of suffering and triumph in each of their cultures.

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Mwakwa Talks to the Loon by Dale Auger

Winner of the Aboriginal Children’s Book of the Year Award, 2006 Anskohk Aboriginal Literature Festival and Book Awards

Kayâs is a young Cree man who is blessed with a Gift that makes him a talented hunter. He knows the ways of the Beings he hunts and can even talk with them in their own languages. But when he becomes proud and takes his abilities for granted, he loses his gift, and the People grow hungry.

With the help of the Elders and the Beings that inhabit the water, Kayâs learns that in order to live a life of success, fulfillment and peace, he must cherish and respect the talents and skills he has been given.

Illustrated with Dale Auger’s powerful, insightful paintings, Mwâkwa Talks to the Loon introduces readers to the basics of life in a Cree village. A glossary with pronunciation guide to the many Cree words and phrases used in the story is included.

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The Name Jar by Yangsook Choi

The new kid in school needs a new name! Or does she? Being the new kid in school is hard enough, but what about when nobody can pronounce your name? Having just moved from Korea, Unhei is anxious that American kids will like her. So instead of introducing herself on the first day of school, she tells the class that she will choose a name by the following week. Her new classmates are fascinated by this no-name girl and decide to help out by filling a glass jar with names for her to pick from. But while Unhei practices being a Suzy, Laura, or Amanda, one of her classmates comes to her neighborhood and discovers her real name and its special meaning. On the day of her name choosing, the name jar has mysteriously disappeared. Encouraged by her new friends, Unhei chooses her own Korean name and helps everyone pronounce it–Yoon-Hey.

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No Monkeys, No Chocolate by Melissa Stewart

Everyone loves chocolate, right? But how many people actually know where chocolate comes from? How it’s made? Or that monkeys do their part to help this delicious sweet exist? This delectable dessert comes from cocoa beans, which grow on cocoa trees in tropical rain forests. But those trees couldn’t survive without the help of a menagerie of rain forest critters: a pollen-sucking midge, an aphid-munching anole lizard, brain-eating coffin fly maggots—they all pitch in to help the cocoa tree survive. A secondary layer of text delves deeper into statements such as “Cocoa flowers can’t bloom without cocoa leaves . . . and maggots,” explaining the interdependence of the plants and animals in the tropical rain forests. Two wise-cracking bookworms appear on every page, adding humor and further commentary, making this book accessible to readers of different ages and reading levels. Back matter includes information about cocoa farming and rain forest preservation, as well as an author’s note.

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The Nutcracker Comes to America by Chris Barton

Every December, The Nutcracker comes to life in theaters all across the United States. But how did this 19th-century Russian ballet become such a big part of the holidays in 21st-century America?

Meet Willam, Harold, and Lew Christensen, three small-town Utah boys who caught the ballet bug in the early 1900s. They performed on vaudeville and took part in the New York City dance scene. Russian immigrants shared the story of The Nutcracker with them, and during World War II, they staged their own Christmastime production in San Francisco. It was America’s first full-length version and the beginning of a delightful holiday tradition.

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The Old Ways by Susan Chapman

Simon enjoys school, TV, pizza, and video games. So when his grandmother tells legends of the sea goddess, Sedna, and his grandfather invites him to build an igloo, Simon’s heart sinks.

“Sorry Ananaksaq, my show is on. Sorry, Ataatga, maybe another time,” he responds.

Secretly he thinks his grandparents are stuck in their old ways. Secretly his grandparents hide their disappointment and wait for “another time.”

Soon enough, that other times comes. When he and his grandparents prepare to visit relatives in Igloolik, Simon thinks it is ridiculous to heap oil lamps, extra fuel, tools, food, snowshoes, and caribou skins onto their sled. But when a blizzard closes in, and the snowmobile breaks down, Simon begins to understand the value of traditional ways.

As the storm rages, they manage to stay snug and fed thanks to the igloo Ataatga builds and the supplies Ananaksaq has provided. When the weather clears, Ataatga snowshoes off in search of help, and that is when Simon learns the true value of Ananaksaq’s stories. Afraid, and with nothing to distract him from their situation, Simon listens to tales of flying polar bears and crows bringing light to the North. When his grandmother’s voice falters, Simon even discovers he is a good storyteller too.

Finally, the hum of engines signals rescue. The family is reunited and makes it safely to Igloolik. But that night, Simon has a special request. “Ataatga, I would like to learn more about the old ways. Tomorrow will you show me how to build an igloo?”

Carefully researched and beautifully illustrated, The Old Ways brings the sparkle of sun on fresh snow to the traditional wisdom of the elders.

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On a Beam of Light by Jennifer Berne

A boy rides a bicycle down a dusty road. But in his mind, he envisions himself traveling at a speed beyond imagining, on a beam of light. This brilliant mind will one day offer up some of the most revolutionary ideas ever conceived. From a boy endlessly fascinated by the wonders around him, Albert Einstein ultimately grows into a man of genius recognized the world over for profoundly illuminating our understanding of the universe. Jennifer Berne and Vladimir Radunsky invite the reader to travel along with Einstein on a journey full of curiosity, laughter, and scientific discovery. Parents and children alike will appreciate this moving story of the powerful difference imagination can make in any life.

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One Plastic Bag by Miranda Paul

Plastic bags are cheap and easy to use. But what happens when a bag breaks or is no longer needed? In Njau, Gambia, people simply dropped the bags and went on their way. One plastic bag became two. Then ten. Then a hundred.

The bags accumulated in ugly heaps alongside roads. Water pooled in them, bringing mosquitoes and disease. Some bags were burned, leaving behind a terrible smell. Some were buried, but they strangled gardens. They killed livestock that tried to eat them. Something had to change.

Isatou Ceesay was that change. She found a way to recycle the bags and transform her community. This inspirational true story shows how one person’s actions really can make a difference in our world.

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One Well by Rochelle Strauss

Every raindrop, lake, underground river and glacier is part of a single global well. Discover the many ways water is used around the world, and what kids can do to protect it.

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Oskar and the Eight Blessings by Tanya Simon

Winner of the 2015 National Jewish Book Award for Children’s Literature

A refugee seeking sanctuary from the horrors of Kristallnacht, Oskar arrives by ship in New York City with only a photograph and an address for an aunt he has never met. It is both the seventh day of Hanukkah and Christmas Eve, 1938. As Oskar walks the length of Manhattan, from the Battery to his new home in the north of the city, he passes experiences the city’s many holiday sights, and encounters it various residents. Each offers Oskar a small act of kindness, welcoming him to the city and helping him on his way to a new life in the new world. This is a heartwarming, timeless picture book.

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Passage to Freedom: The Sugihara Story by Ken Mochizuki

Mochizuki and Lee’s (Baseball Saved Us) skillful volume pays tribute to Chiune Sugihara, a Japanese diplomat posted to Lithuania who in 1940 saved the lives of thousands of Polish Jews. Defying orders from his government, Sugihara handwrote visas for weeks to grant refugees passage through the Soviet Union to Japan. Told in the voice of his then-five-year-old son, the narrative centers upon the boy’s impressions: the creaking of the bedsprings as his sleepless father tossed and turned, the Jewish children huddled outside the consulate, his mother massaging her husband’s cramped arm. Lee’s precise, haunting art, created by scratching out images from beeswax applied to paper and then adding oil paint and colored pencil, has the look of sepia-toned photographs: it unites carefully balanced compositions and emotional intensity. Mochizuki and Lee’s inspired treatment brings out the import of Sugihara’s brave and compassionate decision. An afterword by Sugihara’s son updates the account: the family spent 18 months in a Soviet internment camp, and his father was stripped of his diplomatic post. A stirring story.

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Pass the Energy Please by Barbara Shaw McKinney (Teacher Guide)

Here is a favorite of elementary science teachers for the food chain. Each of the creatures passes the energy in its own unique way. In this upbeat rhyming story, the food chain connects herbivores, carnivores, insects and plants together in a fascinating circle of players. All beings on Earth—from the anchovy to the zooplankton—depend upon the green plant, which is the hero of the story. The special talent of the author shines again (see also A Drop Around the World) for being able to present the science curriculum so concisely, creatively, and cleverly.

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The Peace Tree from Hiroshima by Sandra Moore

**Winner of the 2015 Gelette Burgess Award for Best Intercultural Book**
**Winner of the 2015 Silver Evergreen Medal for World Peace**

This true children’s story is told by a little bonsai tree, called Miyajima, that lived with the same family in the Japanese city of Hiroshima for more than 300 years before being donated to the National Arboretum in Washington DC in 1976 as a gesture of friendship between America and Japan to celebrate the American Bicentennial.
From the Book:
“In 1625, when Japan was a land of samurai and castles, I was a tiny pine seedling. A man called Itaro Yamaki picked me from the forest where I grew and took me home with him. For more than three hundred years, generations of the Yamaki family trimmed and pruned me into a beautiful bonsai tree. In 1945, our household survived the atomic bombing of Hiroshima. In 1976, I was donated to the National Arboretum in Washington D.C., where I still live today—the oldest and perhaps the wisest tree in the bonsai museum.”

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Pippo the Fool by Tracey E. Fern

The Cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence was a marvel of art, architecture, and engineering. But it lacked a finishing ornament, a crown—a dome! This book tells the story of architect Filippo Brunelleschi and the construction of his masterpiece.

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Pythagoras and the Ratios (and What’s Your Angle Pythagoras) by Julie Ellis

Author Julie Ellis and illustrator Phyllis Hornung Peacock team up once again to explore Pythagorean ratios in Pythagoras and the Ratios, the humorous sequel to What s Your Angle, Pythagoras? Pythagoras and his cousins want to win a music contest, but first they must figure out how to play their instruments in tune, something that s never been done before. While trying to fix the problem, Pythagoras makes an important discovery—notes that sound pleasant together have a certain mathematical relationship. When Pythagoras applies this ratio to his cousins pipes and lyres, the result is music to the ears.

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Rachel Carson and Her Book that Changed the World by Laurie Lawlor

In celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of Silent Spring, here is a biography of the pioneering environmentalist. “Once you are aware of the wonder and beauty of earth, you will want to learn about it,” wrote Rachel Carson. She wrote Silent Spring, the book that woke people up to the harmful impact humans were having on our planet. Silent Spring was first published in 1962. Winner of the award for Outstanding Science Trade Books for Students K-12 for 2013, a cooperative project of the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) and the Children’s Book Council.

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Raven Brings Back the Light by Roy Henry Vickers

In a time when darkness covered the land, a boy named Weget is born who is destined to bring the light. With the gift of a raven’s skin that allows him to fly as well as transform, Weget turns into a bird and journeys from Haida Gwaii into the sky. There he finds the Chief of the Heavens who keeps the light in a box. By transforming himself into a pine needle, clever Weget tricks the Chief and escapes with the daylight back down to Earth.
Vividly portrayed through the art of Roy Henry Vickers, Weget’s story has been passed down for generations. The tale has been traced back at least 3,000 years by archeologists who have found images of Weget’s journey in petroglyphs on the Nass and Skeena rivers. This version of the story originates from one told to the author by Chester Bolton, Chief of the Ravens, from the village of Kitkatla around 1975.

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Raven Brings Back the Sun by Suzanne I. Barchers

In the far north of Canada, daylight disappears for much of the year. This Inuit legend describes how the First People of Canada explained the sun’s return to their remote lands.

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Razia’s Ray of Hope by Elizabeth Suneby

Razia dreams of getting an education, but in her small village in Afghanistan, girls haven’t been allowed to attend school for many years. When a new girls’ school opens in the village, a determined Razia must convince her father and oldest brother that educating her would be best for her, their family and their community.

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The Red Bicycle by Jude Isabella

Leo rides his beloved red bicycle to school, soccer practice and everywhere in between. He is devastated when he outgrows Big Red. But when Leo learns of a bicycle donation program, he perks up—someone who really needs his bike can give it a new life. Little does he know that Big Red will change other people’s lives, too. Follow the bike as it travels to West Africa, where it helps people in Burkina Faso bring goods to the market, and serves as a makeshift ambulance, proving that an ordinary bicycle can be truly extraordinary.

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A Rock is Lively by Dianna Hutts Aston

From the award-winning creators of An Egg Is Quiet, A Seed Is Sleepy, and A Butterfly Is Patient comes a gorgeous and informative introduction to the fascinating world of rocks. From dazzling blue lapis lazuli to volcanic snowflake obsidian, an incredible variety of rocks are showcased in all their splendor. Poetic in voice and elegant in design, this book introduces an array of facts, making it equally perfect for classroom sharing and family reading.

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Rosie Revere, Engineer (Iggy Peck, Architect and Ida Twist, Scientist) by Andrea Beatty

Rosie may seem quiet during the day, but at night she’s a brilliant inventor of gizmos and gadgets who dreams of becoming a great engineer. When her great-great-aunt Rose (Rosie the Riveter) comes for a visit and mentions her one unfinished goal—to fly—Rosie sets to work building a contraption to make her aunt’s dream come true. But when her contraption doesn’t fly but rather hovers for a moment and then crashes, Rosie deems the invention a failure. On the contrary, Aunt Rose insists that Rosie’s contraption was a raging success: you can only truly fail, she explains, if you quit.

From the powerhouse author-illustrator team of Iggy Peck, Architect comes Rosie Revere, Engineer, another charming, witty picture book about believing in yourself and pursuing your passion.

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Ruth Law Thrills a Nation by Don Brown

In 1916 a young woman named Ruth Law attempted to fly from Chicago to New York City in one day—something no one else had ever done. This is the story of that daring attempt. Beautifully detailed watercolors dramatize a dangerous journey made by the pilot President Woodrow Wilson called “great.” Full-color illustrations.

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Salmon Stream by Carol Reed-Jones

Named a prestigious CBC/NSTA Outstanding Science Trade Book, this is a poetic yet accurate description of the life cycle of salmon. For kids, it is fun and eye-opening. For teachers, it is a valuable supplement to a unit on water, fish and ocean animals, and life cycles. Fast-paced prose and brilliant illustrations follow the salmon from their form as eggs in a stream to the wide ocean, eventually making a hazardous journey home to their stream of origin. As in her earlier best-selling book, “The Tree in the Ancient Forest,” author Carol Reed-Jones uses cumulative verse – a literary technique that is not only enjoyable but suggests how interconnected salmon are with their habitat. At the back is a section on salmon facts and what makes a good habitat for them, teaching the basics of ecology and why clean streams and waters are so important.

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The Secret Life of Walter Kitty by Barbara Jean Hicks

Walter Kitty is no ordinary housecat. He’s Fang–a swashbuckling protector of the high seas, a tiger waiting to pounce on unsuspecting prey, and a caped superhero ready to save the day. But do his “people,” Mr. and Mrs. Biddle, acknowledge his greatness? Not even!So once in a good long while, Walter will answer to Wally or Kitten or even Snookums, but most of the time . . . he’s Fang!With a hilarious text by Barbara Jean Hicks and fabulously fun illustrations by Dan Santat, Walter Kitty is one cat readers will not soon forget!

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Secret of the Dance by Andrea Spalding

In 1935, a nine-year-old boy’s family held a forbidden Potlatch in faraway Kingcome Inlet. Watl’kina slipped from his bed to bear witness. In the Big House masked figures danced by firelight to the beat of the drum. And there, he saw a figure he knew. Aboriginal elder Alfred Scow and award-winning author Andrea Spalding collaborate to tell the story, to tell the secret of the dance.

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Sir Cumference and the First Round Table (and series) by Cindy Neuschwander

King Arthur was a good ruler, but in this math adventure he needs a good ruler. Geometry is explained with humor in SIR CUMFERENCE AND THE FIRST ROUND TABLE, making it fun and accessible for beginners. What would you do if the neighboring kingdom were threatening war? Naturally, you’d call your strongest and bravest knights together to come up with a solution. But when your conference table causes more problems than the threat of your enemy, you need expert help. Enter Sir Cumference, his wife Lady Di of Ameter, and their son Radius. With the help of the carpenter, Geo of Metry, this sharp-minded team designs the perfect table conducive to discussing the perfect peace plan. Thanks to Sir Cumference, even the most hesitant will be romancing math.

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Six Dots by Jen Bryant

An inspiring picture-book biography of Louis Braille—a blind boy so determined to read that he invented his own alphabet.

Louis Braille was just five years old when he lost his sight. He was a clever boy, determined to live like everyone else, and what he wanted more than anything was to be able to read.

Even at the school for the blind in Paris, there were no books for him.

And so he invented his own alphabet—a whole new system for writing that could be read by touch. A system so ingenious that it is still used by the blind community today.

Award-winning writer Jen Bryant tells Braille’s inspiring story with a lively and accessible text, filled with the sounds, the smells, and the touch of Louis’s world. Boris Kulikov’s inspired paintings help readers to understand what Louis lost, and what he was determined to gain back through books.

An author’s note and additional resources at the end of the book complement the simple story and offer more information for parents and teachers.

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Soccer Fence by Phil Bidner

In a country struggling with acceptance, hope can come in many different forms.
As a boy, Hector loved playing soccer in his small Johannesburg township. He dreamed of playing on a real pitch with the boys from another part of the city, but apartheid made that impossible. Then, in 1990, Nelson Mandela was released from prison, and apartheid began to crumble. The march toward freedom in South Africa was a slow one, but when the beloved Bafana Bafana national soccer team won the African Cup of Nations, Hector realized that dreams once impossible could now come true.
This poignant story of friendship artfully depicts a brief but critical moment in South Africa’s history and the unique role that sports can play in bringing people together.

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The Star People by S.D. Nelson

A grandmother’s love is forever In this mystical story of remembrance and tradition, Sister Girl and her brother, Young Wolf, wander far from their village and face great danger, including stampeding animals and a wall of fire. The children barely save themselves, and as night approaches, they find themselves alone in the barren and unforgiving wilderness. How will they find home? As the stars shine brightly, the spirit of their grandmother, Elk Tooth Woman, appears to guide them: “The Star People are always with you. Look up, and you will see me among the stars.” S. D. Nelson’s compelling illustrations, inspired by the ledger-book style of the Plains Indians, capture the beauty of humans and nature existing as one.

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Starry Messenger by Peter Sis

“If they had seen what we see, they would have judged as we judge.” — Galileo Galilei

In every age there are courageous people who break with tradition to explore new ideas and challenge accepted truths. Galileo Galilei was just such a man—a genius—and the first to turn the telescope to the skies to map the heavens. In doing so, he offered objective evidence that the earth was not the fixed center of the universe but that it and all the other planets revolved around the sun. Galileo kept careful notes and made beautiful drawings of all that he observed. Through his telescope he brought the starts down to earth for everyone to see.

By changing the way people saw the galaxy, Galileo was also changing the way they saw themselves and their place in the universe. This was very exciting, but to some to some it was deeply disturbing. Galileo has upset the harmonious view of heaven and earth that had been accepted since ancient times. He had turned the world upside down.

In this amazing new book, Peter Sís employs the artist’s lens to give us an extraordinary view of the life of Galileo Galilei. Sís tells his story in language as simple as a fairy tale, in pictures as rich and tightly woven as a tapestry, and in Galileo’s own words, written more than 350 years ago and still resonant with truth.

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Swan by Laurel Snyder

The world is big.

Anna is small.

The snow is

everywhere

and all around.

But one night . . .

One night, her mother takes her to the ballet, and everything is changed. Anna finds a beauty inside herself that she cannot contain.

So begins the journey of a girl who will one day grow up to be the most famous prima ballerina of all time, inspiring legions of dancers after her: the brave, the generous, the transcendently gifted Anna Pavlova. Beautiful, inspirational, and triumphant, Anna Pavlova’s life is masterfully captured in this exquisite picture book.

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Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt by Deborah Hopkinson

As a seamstress in the Big House, Clara dreams of a reunion with her Momma, who lives on another plantation–and even of running away to freedom. Then she overhears two slaves talking about the Underground Railroad. In a flash of inspiration, Clara sees how she can use the cloth in her scrap bag to make a map of the land–a freedom quilt–that no master will ever suspect.

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Talking Walls Margy Burns Knight

If walls could talk, what would they say? Perhaps they would tell us who built them and why. Maybe they could even tell us about people’s lives today. In this book walls really do talk, and oh, the stories they tell. Talking Walls: Discover Your World combines and updates two earlier books, Talking Walls (1992) and Talking Walls: The Stories Continue (1996), which have sold 170,000 copies. This new edition includes revised text that makes it more accessible to English Language Learners and easier to read aloud.

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Teacup by Rebecca Young

A stunning picture book that addresses life’s big journeys with hope, beauty, and reassurance
School Library Journal [STARRED REVIEW!]

“[A] moving, allegorical tale… inspiring reflection and empathy”

Kirkus Reviews [STARRED REVIEW!]

“A potent discussion starter… Enchanting, beautiful, and full of hope. ”

Booklist [STARRED REVIEW!]

“A lyrical tale of leaving home and finding a new one…Thought-provoking and arrestingly beautiful.”

A boy must leave his home and find another. He brings with him a teacup full of earth from the place where he grew up, and sets off to sea. Some days, the journey is peaceful, and the skies are cloudless and bright. Some days, storms threaten to overturn his boat. And some days, the smallest amount of hope grows into something glorious. At last, the boy finds land, but it doesn’t feel complete . . . until another traveler joins him, bearing the seed to build a new home.

With lyrical text and gorgeous artwork, this poignant picture book is perfect for discussing all of life’s toughest challenges—a big move, a divorce, long-distance separation, or even the current refugee crisis—in a way that’s reassuring and inspiring for children and adults alike.

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This Child, Every Child by David J. Smith

The team behind If the World Were a Village returns with a revealing glimpse into the lives of children around the world. This Child, Every Child uses statistics and stories to draw kids into the world beyond their own borders and provide a window into the lives of fellow children.

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Tibet Through the Red Box by Peter Sis

A father’s diary, an artist’s memoir. By the author of the best-selling Three Golden Keys.

While my father was in China and Tibet, he kept a diary, which was later locked in a red box. We weren’t allowed to touch the box. The stories I heard as a little boy faded to a hazy dream, and my drawings from that time make no sense. I cannot decipher them. It was not until I myself had gone far, far away and received the message from my father that I became interested in the red box again . . .

In New York, Peter Sis receives a letter from his father. “The Red Box is now yours,” it says. The brief note worries him and pulls him back to Prague, where the contents of the red box explain the mystery of his father’s long absence during the 1950s.

Czechoslovakia was behind the iron curtain; Vladimir Sis, a documentary filmmaker of considerable talent, was drafted into the army and sent to China to teach filmmaking. He left his wife, daughter, and young son, Peter, thinking he would be home for Christmas. Two Christmases would pass before he was heard from again: Vladimir Sis was lost in Tibet. He met with the Dalai Lama; he witnessed China’s invasion of Tibet. When he returned to Prague, he dared not talk to his friends about all he had seen and experienced. But over and over again he told Peter about his Tibetan adventures. Weaving their two stories together – that of the father lost in Tibet and that of the small boy in Prague, lost without his father – Sis draws from his father’s diary and from his own recollections of his father’s incredible tales to reach a spiritual homecoming between father and son. With his sublime pictures, inspired by Tibetan Buddhist art and linking history to memory, Peter Sis gives us an extraordinary book – a work of singular artistry and rare imagination.

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Toads and Tessellations by Sharon Morrisette

Enzo, a bumbling young magician’s apprentice, is called upon to help the village shoemaker create twelve identical pairs of shoes from only one piece of leather. With help from his friends (and some lucky mishaps), he realizes that math, not magic, is the answer to his problems.

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Train to Somewhere by Eve Bunting

Marianne, heading west with fourteen other children on an Orphan Train, is sure her mother will show up at one of the stations along the way. When her mother left Marianne at the orphanage, hadn’t she promised she’d come for her after making a new life in the West? Stop after stop goes by, and there’s no sign of her mother in the crowds that come to look over the children. No one shows any interest in adopting shy, plain Marianne, either. But that’s all right: She has to be free for her mother to claim her. Then the train pulls into its final stop, a town called Somewhere . . .

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Turtle Summer by Mary Alice Monroe

This is a companion book to Mary Alice Monroe’s novel, Swimming Lessons, the sequel to The Beach House. In the novel, the readers witness a young mother, Toy, writing a journal for her daughter, Little Lovie. This is the journal Toy is writing. Using original photographs, this scrapbook journal explains the nesting cycle of sea turtles and the natural life along the Southeastern coast, including local shore birds, shells, and the sea turtle hospital. Adults and children will enjoy the images, information and the journal with or without the novel. The “For Creative Minds” educational section includes turtle nesting facts, a shell identification activity, and a make-your-own nature journal.

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A Very Improbable Story by Edward Einhorn

Ethan wakes up one morning with a talking cat on his head. The cat refuses to budge until Ethan wins a game of probability.

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The Voyageur’s Paddle by Kathy-jo Wargin

Voyageur is the French word for “traveler,” but in the Great Lakes region during the seventeenth century it described those men who made their living trading furs and goods along water routes. Traveling by canoe, these voyageurs helped to establish north woods trading posts and settlements, opening up the West to future exploration. Young Jacques’s father is such a voyageur. He works long hours in bitterly cold weather, absent from home for weeks at a time. As he awaits his father’s return from a season of trading, Jacques dreams of the day he will hold the canoe paddle and join the ranks of voyageurs.

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The Wall by Peter Sis

“I was born at the beginning of it all, on the Red side—the Communist side—of the Iron Curtain.” Through annotated illustrations, journals, maps, and dreamscapes, Peter Sís shows what life was like for a child who loved to draw, proudly wore the red scarf of a Young Pioneer, stood guard at the giant statue of Stalin, and believed whatever he was told to believe. But adolescence brought questions. Cracks began to appear in the Iron Curtain, and news from the West slowly filtered into the country. Sís learned about beat poetry, rock ‘n’ roll, blue jeans, and Coca-Cola. He let his hair grow long, secretly read banned books, and joined a rock band. Then came the Prague Spring of 1968, and for a teenager who wanted to see the world and meet the Beatles, this was a magical time. It was short-lived, however, brought to a sudden and brutal end by the Soviet-led invasion. But this brief flowering had provided a glimpse of new possibilities—creativity could be discouraged but not easily killed.

By joining memory and history, Sís takes us on his extraordinary journey: from infant with paintbrush in hand to young man borne aloft by the wings of his art. This title has Common Core connections.

The Wall is a 2007 New York Times Book Review Best Illustrated Book of the Year, a 2008 Caldecott Honor Book, a 2008 Bank Street – Best Children’s Book of the Year, the winner of the 2008 Boston Globe – Horn Book Award for Nonfiction, and a nominee for the 2008 Eisner Award for Best Publication for Kids.

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Wangari Maathai by Frank Prevot

Wangari Maathai received the Nobel Peace Prize in 2004 for her efforts to lead women in a nonviolent struggle to bring peace and democracy to Africa through its reforestation. Her organization planted over thirty million trees in thirty years. This beautiful picture book tells the story of an amazing woman and an inspiring idea.

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Wired by Anastasia Suen

From the power plant all the way to your house, electricity is on the move! In rhythmic text, Anastasia Suen breaks the complex subject of electricity down to its essential parts. Paul Carrick’s brilliant, three-dimensional illustrations crackle with energy.

 

 

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Work and More Work by Linda Little

Tom lives in the countryside in the mid 1800s and he’s curious — what is it like in the town, the city and the world beyond? It’s all “work and more work,” everyone tells him. Determined to find out for himself, Tom sets off with a bit of bread and cheese in a bundle…

Reviews by Overdrive

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