Socio-Emotional Picture Booklist

Socio-emotional definition: Socio-emotional development is the development of a child’s experience, expression, management of emotions, and ability to create relationships. Reference

These Picture Books all relate to Socio-Emotional Development:

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Ah Ha! by Jeff Mack

Frog is settling in for a relaxing day at the pond. (AAHH.) But wait—there are other creatures at the pond as well. (AH HA!) And some of them are out to get Frog. (AHHH!) Not to worry, Frog gets the last laugh. (HA HA!) Using only two letters, along with many brightly colored and lively illustrations, Jeff Mack brings his hallmark humor to this rollicking book that will leave young readers guessing, laughing, and on the edge of their seats.

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Always Near Me by Susie Poole

Based on Psalm 139, Always Near Me helps children understand God’s omnipresence.

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The Amazing Erik by Mike Huber

Playing at the water table is fun. But Erik thinks getting splashed is not fun. When his sleeve gets wet, Erik gets sad, and he can’t imagine ever being happy again. Then, with a classmate by his side, Erik becomes absorbed by a new idea: making the water disappear. As it does, Erik discovers his sadness has vanished and happiness has reappeared, like magic. Airdah-taroo!

The book contains a page of information to help adults connect the story to children’s experiences.

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And Two Boys Booed by Judith Viorst

On the day of the talent show, a boy is ready to sing his song, and he isn’t one bit scared because he has practiced a billion times, plus he’s wearing his lucky blue boots and his pants with all ten pockets. But as all of the other kids perform before him, he gets more and more nervous. How the boy overcomes his fear of performing in front of the class makes a charming and funny read-aloud, complete with ten novelty flaps to lift. Note to Readers: Tap on images with golden borders to see more!

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Be Quiet Marina by Kirsten DeBear

Marina and Moira like playing together, but Marina is noisy and Moira like quiet. How two preschoolers, one with Cerebral Palsy and one with Down syndrome, become best friends is beautifully told in words and photographs.

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The Bear and the Piano by David Litchfield

One day, a bear cub finds something strange and wonderful in the forest. When he touches the keys, they make a horrible noise. Yet he is drawn back again and again. Eventually, he learns to play beautiful sounds, delighting his woodland friends.

Then the bear is invited to share his sounds with new friends in the city. He longs to explore the world beyond his home, and to play bigger and better than before. But he knows that if he leaves, the other bears will be very sad . . . This gorgeously illustrated tale of following one’s dreams reminds us of the value of friendship, wherever we go.

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Berenstain Bears Faithful Friend by Jan and Mike Berenstain

When Sister Bear starts to play with a new friend, Lizzy feels jealous. The Berenstain Bears Faithful Friends teaches that new friends are fun to have and old friends are great to keep.

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Bringing Asha Home by Uma Krishnaswami

It’s Rakhi, the Hindu holiday special to brothers and sisters, and Arun wishes he had a sister with whom to celebrate. Soon it looks as if his wish will come true. His parents are going to adopt a baby girl named Asha. She is coming all the way from India, where Arun’s dad was born.

The family prepares for Asha’s arrival, not knowing it will be almost a year until they receive governmental approval to bring Asha home. Arun is impatient and struggles to accept the long delay, but as time passes he finds his own special ways to build a bond with his sister, who is still halfway around the world.

With warmth and honesty, this tender story taps into the feelings of longing, love and joy that adoption brings to many families. Readers will find reassurance knowing there is more than one way to become part of a loving family.

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The Butter Man by Elizabeth Alalou

While Nora waits impatiently for dinner, her father stirs up a story from his childhood. During a famine Nora’s grandfather must travel over the mountains to find work so he can provide food for his family. While young Ali waits for his father’s return, he learns a lesson of patience, perseverance, and hope.

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A Dog for a Friend by Marilynn Reynolds

Jessie lives with her parents on a farm a long way from anywhere. There are no other people for miles around. Often, she is lonely. More than anything, Jessie wants a dog; a friend who will play with her, come running when she calls and sleep with its head on her lap. Her mother and father can’t see any need for a dog on a wheat farm. Besides, there’s so much work to do. They don’t have time for a pet. Jessie will just have to wait.But one autumn night, the sow in the barn has her litter, and Jessie notices one piglet who is smaller and weaker than the others. When the little runt begins to ail, Jessie persuades her father to bring it into the house so it can be nursed back to health. At last Jessie has what she really wanted all along-a friend who needed her.Set on the prairies during the 1920’s, A Dog for a Friend is a heartwarming story about the aching need for companionship that every child will identify with and understand.

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Field Trip Fiasco by Julie Danneberg

Sarah Jane Hartwell and her class are back. After the stress of her last attempt at taking her class on a field trip (seen in First Year Letters), Mrs. Hartwell has a plan for an upcoming trip to the zoo—a plan that includes a lot of rules. Her students prove that they can line up straight, walk quietly, and take plenty of notes, but everyone soon realizes that this field trip isn’t as much fun as they’d hoped. Mrs. Hartwell rethinks her plan and saves the day.

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Franklin Books by Paulette Bourgeois

When Franklin in the Dark, was released in 1986, it became a bestseller—and the Franklin phenomenon was born. Paulette has gone on to write over 30 Franklin stories illustrated by Brenda Clark that have been published around the world.

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Frederick by Leo Lionni

While the other field mice work to gather grain and nuts for winter, Frederick sits on a sunny rock by himself. “I gather sun rays for the cold dark winter days,” he tells them. Another day he gathers “colors,” and then “words.” And when the food runs out, it is Frederick, the dreamer and poet, whose endless store of supplies warms the hearts of his fellow mice, and feeds their spirits during the darkest winter days. Frederick’s story will warm readers as well in this Caldecott Honor winning fable.

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I Want to Do it Myself by Tony Ross

The Little Princess is going camping. Everyone offers to help, but she doesn’t want any help. “I want to do it myself!” she insists. So she sets off all on her own to find the perfect camp site. When she finds the right spot, she discovers she’s forgotten a few important things. Maybe she needs a little help after all.

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Iggy Peck, Architect by Andrea Beaty

Meet Iggy Peck—creative, independent, and not afraid to express himself! In the spirit of David Shannon’s No, David and Rosemary Wells’s Noisy Nora, Iggy Peck will delight readers looking for irreverent, inspired fun. Iggy has one passion: building. His parents are proud of his fabulous creations, though they’re sometimes surprised by his materials—who could forget the tower he built of dirty diapers? When his second-grade teacher declares her dislike of architecture, Iggy faces a challenge. He loves building too much to give it up! With Andrea Beaty’s irresistible rhyming text and David Roberts’s puckish illustrations, this book will charm creative kids everywhere, and amuse their sometimes bewildered parents.

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Imani’s Moon by JaNay Brown-Wood

Imani is a young Maasi girl with a loving mother and a desire to do something great. When she decides she wants to touch the moon, she works hard to reach her goal, even in the face of teasing from the naysayers around her.

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Last Stop on Market Street by Matt De La Pena

Sunday after church, CJ and his grandma ride the bus across town. But today, CJ wonders why they don’t own a car like his friend Colby. Why doesn’t he have an iPod like the boys on the bus? How come they always have to get off in the dirty part of town? Each question is met with an encouraging answer from grandma, who helps him see the beauty—and fun—in their routine and the world around them.

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Llama Llama and the Bully Goat by Anna Dewdney

Llama Llama is learning lots of new things at school and making many friends. But when Gilroy Goat starts teasing him and some of their classmates, Llama Llama isn’t sure what to do. And then he remembers what his teacher told him—walk away and tell someone. It works! But then Llama Llama feels badly. Can he and Gilroy try to be friends again?

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Maggie’s Chopsticks by Alan Woo

Poor Maggie struggles to master her chopsticks — it seems nearly everyone around the dinner table has something to say about the “right” way to hold them! But when Father reminds her not to worry about everyone else, Maggie finally gets a grip on an important lesson.

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The Moccasin Goalie by William Roy Brownridge

Danny and his friends, Anita, Petou and Marcel, are typical prairie youngsters—hockey mad. The four are always playing road hockey or involved in a game of shinny on the community rink. One day a town team, the Wolves, is formed. The friends are overjoyed, but when the time comes to choose the team, only Marcel is picked. The other three friends are not chosen; Anita is a girl, Petou is too small and Danny cannot skate. It is the biggest disappointment of Danny’s life. But near the end of the season, the regular goalie is injured and Danny is asked to replace him. If the Wolves can win the game, they will make the playoffs! This is Danny’s chance to prove that even though he can’t wear a pair of skates, he can still play the game.

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A Morning to Polish and Keep by Julie Lawson

A real fish tale! When “the big one” gets away, Amy figures the day is ruined. Or is it? Set on Canada’s west coast, A Morning to Polish and Keep is a story of adventure, family interaction and the lasting comfort of memory.

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Mrs Katz and Tush by Patricia Polacco

In this special Passover story, Larnel Moore, a young African-American boy, and Mrs. Katz, an elderly Jewish woman, develop an unusual friendship through their mutual concern for an abandoned cat named Tush. Together they explore the common themes of suffering and triumph in each of their cultures.

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The Most Magnificent Thing by Ashley Spires

A little girl and her canine assistant set out to make the most magnificent thing. But after much hard work, the end result is not what the girl had in mind. Frustrated, she quits. Her assistant suggests a long walk, and as they walk, it slowly becomes clear what the girl needs to do to succeed. A charming story that will give kids the most magnificent thing: perspective!

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My Heart Fills with Happiness by Monique Gray Smith

The sun on your face. The smell of warm bannock baking in the oven. Holding the hand of someone you love. What fills your heart with happiness? This beautiful board book, with illustrations from celebrated artist Julie Flett, serves as a reminder for little ones and adults alike to reflect on and cherish the moments in life that bring us joy.

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The Name Jar by Yangsook Choi

The new kid in school needs a new name! Or does she?
Being the new kid in school is hard enough, but what about when nobody can pronounce your name? Having just moved from Korea, Unhei is anxious that American kids will like her. So instead of introducing herself on the first day of school, she tells the class that she will choose a name by the following week. Her new classmates are fascinated by this no-name girl and decide to help out by filling a glass jar with names for her to pick from. But while Unhei practices being a Suzy, Laura, or Amanda, one of her classmates comes to her neighborhood and discovers her real name and its special meaning. On the day of her name choosing, the name jar has mysteriously disappeared. Encouraged by her new friends, Unhei chooses her own Korean name and helps everyone pronounce it—Yoon-Hey.

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The Old Ways by Susan Chapman

Simon enjoys school, TV, pizza, and video games. So when his grandmother tells legends of the sea goddess, Sedna, and his grandfather invites him to build an igloo, Simon’s heart sinks.”Sorry Ananaksaq, my show is on. Sorry, Ataatga, maybe another time,” he responds.Secretly he thinks his grandparents are stuck in their old ways. Secretly his grandparents hide their disappointment and wait for “another time.”Soon enough, that other times comes. When he and his grandparents prepare to visit relatives in Igloolik, Simon thinks it is ridiculous to heap oil lamps, extra fuel, tools, food, snowshoes, and caribou skins onto their sled. But when a blizzard closes in, and the snowmobile breaks down, Simon begins to understand the value of traditional ways.As the storm rages, they manage to stay snug and fed thanks to the igloo Ataatga builds and the supplies Ananaksaq has provided. When the weather clears, Ataatga snowshoes off in search of help, and that is when Simon learns the true value of Ananaksaq’s stories. Afraid, and with nothing to distract him from their situation, Simon listens to tales of flying polar bears and crows bringing light to the North. When his grandmother’s voice falters, Simon even discovers he is a good storyteller too.Finally, the hum of engines signals rescue. The family is reunited and makes it safely to Igloolik. But that night, Simon has a special request. “Ataatga, I would like to learn more about the old ways. Tomorrow will you show me how to build an igloo?”

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Oliver Button is a Sissy by Tomie dePaola

A little boy must come to terms with being teased and ostracized because he’d rather read books, paint pictures, and tap-dance than participate in sports. “There is a good balance between the simple text . . . and the expressive pictures . . . an attractive little book.”—School Library Journal

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Peace Week in Mrs. Fox’s Class by Eileen Spinelli

Miss Fox is tired of hearing her young students quarrel. So she announces Peace Week—no more squabbling for one whole week! The children chime in with their own rules: no fighting, don’t say mean things, and help others. Throughout the week each of the little animals gets a chance to practice this new behavior. When Polecat teases Bunny for wearing a bright yellow sweater, instead of poking fun back at Polecat, Bunny admires his sweater.

Soon, to their surprise, the animals are finding that it’s easy to help others, take turns, and say nice things, even when someone is grumpy to them. Wouldn’t it be nice, Squirrel says, if every week could be Peace Week?

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Penguin and Pumpkin by Salina Yoon

When Penguin and Bootsy plan a field trip in search of Fall, Penguin’s little brother, Pumpkin, wants to come. Pumpkin is heartbroken to find out he’s too little to go, and when Penguin tries to say good-bye, his brother is nowhere to be found! At the farm, all the pumpkins Penguin sees remind him of his own special Pumpkin.

So Penguin and Bootsy bring a special surprise home to share a little touch of Autumn with Pumpkin. Prolific author/illustrator Salina Yoon’s spare text and bright, energetic illustrations bring to life this endearing story celebrating Autumn and family in many forms!

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Rosie Revere, Engineer by Andrea Beaty

Rosie may seem quiet during the day, but at night she’s a brilliant inventor of gizmos and gadgets who dreams of becoming a great engineer. When her great-great-aunt Rose (Rosie the Riveter) comes for a visit and mentions her one unfinished goal—to fly—Rosie sets to work building a contraption to make her aunt’s dream come true. But when her contraption doesn’t fly but rather hovers for a moment and then crashes, Rosie deems the invention a failure. On the contrary, Aunt Rose insists that Rosie’s contraption was a raging success: you can only truly fail, she explains, if you quit.

From the powerhouse author-illustrator team of Iggy Peck, Architect comes Rosie Revere, Engineer, another charming, witty picture book about believing in yourself and pursuing your passion.

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Sometimes you Barf by Nancy Carlson

Everybody barfs. Dogs, cats, chickens, alligators, and even you. It happens to everyone, and sometimes it even happens . . . at school. With her characteristic humor and compassion, Nancy Carlson helps young readers through what is often a scary and embarrassing rite of passage. Sometimes you barf. But it’s OK. You get better!

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Sunshine on my Shoulders by John Denver

This heartwarming book—an adaptation of one of John Denver’s best-loved songs—is a lovely reminder of the good, pure things in life. “Sunshine On My Shoulders” celebrates friendship, sunshine and simple joy. Children and adults alike will love Christopher Canyon’s whimsical and humorous illustrations, that capture the innocence of childhood. This is one of a series of picture book adaptations of John Denver’s songs that reflect the gift of friendship and nature.

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Thomas’ Snowsuit by Robert Munsch

Thomas refuses to wear his new snowsuit despite the pleas of his mother, his teacher, and even his principal.

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Train to Somewhere by Eve Bunting

Marianne, heading west with fourteen other children on an Orphan Train, is sure her mother will show up at one of the stations along the way. When her mother left Marianne at the orphanage, hadn’t she promised she’d come for her after making a new life in the West? Stop after stop goes by, and there’s no sign of her mother in the crowds that come to look over the children. No one shows any interest in adopting shy, plain Marianne, either. But that’s all right: She has to be free for her mother to claim her. Then the train pulls into its final stop, a town called Somewhere . . .

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Waiting for Whales by Sheryl McFarlane

In this timeless story set on the West Coast, an old man lives alone on a bluff overlooking the sea and tends his garden. And waits. Only when the whales return each year to the bay in front of his cottage is his loneliness eased. One day, his daughter and her baby return home to live with the old man, bringing a renewed sense of purpose to his life. As his granddaughter grows, the old man passes on a wealth or knowledge and wisdom as well as his passion for the whales. And each year they wait together for the whales to appear. A gentle story that illuminates the unique friendship between grandparent and child, Waiting for the Whales also suggests that aging and death are only part of a greater cycle of rebirth and continuity.

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What does it Mean to be Kind? by Rana DiOrio

A girl in a red hat finds the courage to be kind to the new student in class. Her kindness spreads, kind act by kind act, until her whole community experiences the magical shift that happens when everyone understands—and acts on—what it means to be kind.

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What does it Mean to be Safe? by Rana DiOrio

Children need easy guidelines to help them understand how to protect themselves and feel secure in their environments. Rana DiOrio’s newest addition to her award-winning series explores physical, emotional, social and cyber safety in unthreatening ways that spark meaningful conversation between adults and children about staying safe.

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When I feel Worried by Cornelia M. Spelman

Everybody worries. Children worry, too—in new or confusing situations, or when someone is angry with them. This new addition to the acclaimed The Way I Feel Series uses reassuring words and touching illustrations to address a child’s anxieties and shows him ways to help him feel better. Cornelia Maude Spelman and Kathy Parkinson team up once again to provide a comforting and empowering book that’s helpful to all families. Includes a foreword for parents and caregivers.

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Work and More Work by Linda Little

Tom lives in the countryside in the mid 1800s and he’s curious — what is it like in the town, the city and the world beyond? It’s all “work and more work,” everyone tells him. Determined to find out for himself, Tom sets off with a bit of bread and cheese in a bundle…

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